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Golden Syrup

  1. LondonGirl profile image90
    LondonGirlposted 5 years ago

    I mentioned this to an American friend recently, and she'd never heard of it!

    Is it a common thing in the USA or not?

    1. Eaglekiwi profile image73
      Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      No ,not called Golden Syrup
      But thinking Karo syrup is the same (havent bought any yet)-just a guess

      There are so many varieties ,but Im not supposed to be in that aisle lol

    2. Uninvited Writer profile image83
      Uninvited Writerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I have fond memories of Golden Syrup growing up in Scotland. I don't believe I've seen it in Canada, but I'm sure it's available somewhere in the country. Is the tin still green? smile

      1. Gordon Hamilton profile image95
        Gordon Hamiltonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        It is indeed. Just as the black treacle tin is still red and is still used here for making Clootie Dumplings! smile

        Sorry I didn't have a tin of golden treacle in the house to photo and for the poor quality of this image. Tins are not easy to photo in artificial light...



        http://s2.hubimg.com/u/5670349_f248.jpg

        1. Gordon Hamilton profile image95
          Gordon Hamiltonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Typo...meant golden syrup!

      2. LondonGirl profile image90
        LondonGirlposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        It is indeed still green. And still has a lion on the tin.

      3. psycheskinner profile image81
        psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You can now get it in a squeeze bottle, which is considerably easier than trying to spoon it out of a can....

        1. Uninvited Writer profile image83
          Uninvited Writerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          It was such fun putting a spoon in and wrapping the syrup around it and not dripping it all over the place smile

  2. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    No. You have to get it at the International Market. To make your ANZAC cookies.  Hypothetically speaking.

  3. jcmayer777 profile image78
    jcmayer777posted 5 years ago

    I've never heard of it.

  4. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    No, Karo syrup is not the same... it's [shudder] made of corn.  In a pinch you can substitute 1 part molasses with 3 parts simple syrup, but it doesn't taste as good.

    1. Eaglekiwi profile image73
      Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Oh yea so it is smile

      Whats Golden Syrup from ...Canesugar?

      (Back home I always remember it in a (Chelsea Golden Syrup)tin ( Chelsea being the big sugar company)

  5. LondonGirl profile image90
    LondonGirlposted 5 years ago

    It's like very pale treacle, and not a million miles away from honey.

    Ah - found the website. Aparently it's:

    For those of you who are scientifically minded… the sucrose molecule splits in half to give glucose and fructose sugars. This inverted syrup is blended back with the original syrup to give a partially inverted syrup. The secret of Lyle's Golden Syrup is the final blend of sucrose, glucose and fructose, which allows the syrup to be so thick and velvety without crystallizing.

    http://www.lylesgoldensyrup.com/

    1. Eaglekiwi profile image73
      Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks LG

      Ohh remember toffee apples, sticky fingers n chipped teeth lol

  6. LondonGirl profile image90
    LondonGirlposted 5 years ago

    Made from sugar, yes.

    We don't really have corn-sugar-syrup products in the UK, I think.

    1. Eaglekiwi profile image73
      Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Was reading (somewhere) that Corn is the major produce grown worldwide now because its by products are used in so many products.

      By the time they add it to any products though ,they rename it.

      Karo is just one derivative.

      I had never really thought about til then, bit scary really.

      Karo,I see is in a lot of store bought candy and some beaut recipes as well.

    2. EmpressFelicity profile image83
      EmpressFelicityposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      We do unfortunately - but in the UK it's called glucose-fructose syrup rather than the more descriptive high-fructose corn syrup.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-fructose_corn_syrup

  7. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    It's a matter of what is close, UK and NZ are near cane and beet for sugar.  Whereas US is awash in corn smile

    1. Eaglekiwi profile image73
      Eaglekiwiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      You girls are so clever smile

  8. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    When I first came to the US everything sweet tasted of corn, which was very disconcerting.  But then I got used to it.  But I still need golden syrup to make biscuits (or as Americans would say, cookies).

  9. LondonGirl profile image90
    LondonGirlposted 5 years ago

    I don't know how one prepares for Bonfire Night without it!

  10. Greek One profile image78
    Greek Oneposted 5 years ago

    I've heard of Maple Syrup and Golden Shower...

    but not of Golden Syrup

    1. Hollie Thomas profile image60
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Reminds me of my grandmother it was always in her pantry. Though, in all honesty, I have no idea what she used it for.

  11. AliciaC profile image96
    AliciaCposted 5 years ago

    Here in Canada I can buy golden syrup in specialty stores and sometimes in regular supermarkets too. Golden syrup sponge pudding was one of my favorite childhood desserts in the UK. The steamed pudding was served with golden syrup dripping over it and was absolutely delicious!

    1. Hollie Thomas profile image60
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I remember that but my grandmother didn't make it. We usually had the honor of sampling her rock like Christmas cake that she had spent months preparing. Of course, we had to say it was wonderful.

  12. LondonGirl profile image90
    LondonGirlposted 5 years ago

    And, half-inched from the Ocado website, here it is.
    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/5670639.jpg

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image83
      Uninvited Writerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I remember it well.

  13. waynet profile image50
    waynetposted 5 years ago

    Ah yes...Nice on Pancakes, Cornflakes and Waffles, although not all three at once!

  14. LondonGirl profile image90
    LondonGirlposted 5 years ago

    I've never had the bottle - and it strikes me as vaguely sacriligious.....

 
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