Black Beans With Epazote

Fresh epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright
Fresh epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright

Stewing Black Beans With Epazote

Preparing black beans with onions and fresh epazote adds a distinctive flavor to a basic dish.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of dry black beans
  • 1 onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 1 bunch of epazote
  • 1.2 cup vinegar
  • 2 t dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper
  • Fresh cilantro for garnish

Kitchen equipment

  • A large stew pot
  • A long spoon
  • A measuring cup
  • A knife and a cutting surface

What to do

  1. Rinse the black beans then soak the dried beans in water overnight.
  2. Start simmering the black beans over low heat at least 6 hour before you plan to serve them.
  3. Chop the onion and peel the garlic.
  4. Add the onions, garlic , oregano and fresh epazote to the pot.
  5. Stew until the beans are tender.
  6. Add salt and pepper.
  7. Serve with rice and garnish with cilantro.

Tips

  • Cooking dried beans can be a long, frustrating task. Start the process a day ahead and allow more time than the package of dried beans recommends. Canned beans will work for this dish, too.
  • Check the simmering beans regularly and add more water if it's needed.

Black beans with epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright
Black beans with epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright

Have you tried epazote?

  • Yes
  • No
See results without voting

About Epazote

Epazote is common throughout Latin America. It is supposed to be a carminative — that is, something that prevents the gassy, unpleasant aftereffects of eating a meal of beans.

The leaves are long and bright green. Fresh epazote smells a little bit chemical — like paint thinner or wood polish. It isn't a strong enough smell to be unpleasant, but the plant doesn't give off an obvious Eat-Me-I'm-Delicious vibe.

Epazote leaves are limp but juicy, and they look vaguely like a cross between mint and dandelion.

What Does Epazote Taste Like?

The fresh leaves taste minty (in that tongue numbing way) but the taste is also sour.

When stewed with beans, the taste of epazote is still distinct, but it is much milder.

Fresh epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright
Fresh epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright
Black beans stewing with epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright
Black beans stewing with epazote / Photo by E. A. Wright

More by this Author


Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working