Insideout Balmoral Chicken Pasty with Clapshot and Peppercorn Sauce

A pasty filled with haggis, chicken and bacon is served on a bed of potato and Swede mash with a peppercorn and mustard sauce
A pasty filled with haggis, chicken and bacon is served on a bed of potato and Swede mash with a peppercorn and mustard sauce

Balmoral Chicken is a classic Scottish dish, consisting of chicken breast stuffed with haggis, wrapped and cooked in bacon. It will very often be served with clapshot and a whisky cream sauce. So what do I mean by insideout Balmoral Chicken? Essentially, instead of stuffing the chicken with haggis, this recipe sees haggis stuffed with chicken, encased in puff pastry as well as the bacon in the form of a pasty. The prepared clapshot is of the traditional variety but whisky sauce can be perceived as a waste of good whisky, so the cream sauce is instead enhanced with cracked black peppercorns.

As for the whisky? Try serving it in a glass immediately before and/or after your meal to much better effect...

List of Ingredients

Principal ingredients for this insideout Balmoral Chicken pasty and clapshot
Principal ingredients for this insideout Balmoral Chicken pasty and clapshot

Cook Time

  • Prep time: 20 min
  • Cook time: 50 min
  • Ready in: 1 hour 10 min
  • Yields: Two medium portions

Ingredients

  • Upper half of horizontally halved chicken breast fillet
  • 3oz haggis meat
  • 4 rashers/slices of bacon
  • 8oz puff pastry
  • 1 large baking potato
  • 1 small Swede turnip/rutabaga
  • 6 fl oz double (heavy) cream
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp freshly chopped chives
  • Butter, for clapshot and for greasing baking tray
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Beaten egg for glazing pastry

Where Can I Buy Scottish Haggis?

It is true to say that fresh haggis may be something you find very difficult to get hold of outside Scotland. The good news is that canned haggis can be purchased online from Amazon. While it may not be as good quality as the freshly made stuff, it will serve adequately well in this type of recipe. Below are links to three different varieties which are currently available to purchase.

Preparing and Assembling the Balmoral Chicken Pasty

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Bacon rashers are arranged on the pasty filling assembly plateHaggis layer is added to baconChicken fillet is laid on haggisMore haggis added to chickenBacon is wrapped around haggis and chickenDisc is cut from rolled pastryBacon, haggis and chicken parcel is added to pastryPastry is folded overCrimping pastryGlazed pasty is ready for the oven
Bacon rashers are arranged on the pasty filling assembly plate
Bacon rashers are arranged on the pasty filling assembly plate
Haggis layer is added to bacon
Haggis layer is added to bacon
Chicken fillet is laid on haggis
Chicken fillet is laid on haggis
More haggis added to chicken
More haggis added to chicken
Bacon is wrapped around haggis and chicken
Bacon is wrapped around haggis and chicken
Disc is cut from rolled pastry
Disc is cut from rolled pastry
Bacon, haggis and chicken parcel is added to pastry
Bacon, haggis and chicken parcel is added to pastry
Pastry is folded over
Pastry is folded over
Crimping pastry
Crimping pastry
Glazed pasty is ready for the oven
Glazed pasty is ready for the oven

Tip/trick: It will become obvious why shortly but it is a good idea to use a plate for assembling the pasty filling exactly the same as you will use as a template for cutting the pastry. This is because you can shape the filling to the serving part of the plate, knowing you will have the right border left around the edge when you add it to the pastry.

  1. Put your oven on to preheat to 400F/200C.
  2. Lay the bacon rashers side by side, slightly overlapping on a plate.
  3. Take about half the haggis and shape it with your hands to about the size of the chicken breast fillet.
  4. Lay the chicken fillet on the haggis and top in similar fashion with the remainder of the haggis.
  5. Fold the bacon over and around the haggis and chicken.
  6. Roll the pastry out on a floured surface large enough to cut a circle from it with a 13" plate.
  7. It now becomes obvious why a similar sized plate was used when assembling the filling. You should be able to sit the filling on half the pastry with a perfect border of around 1" remaining all around.
  8. Glaze the border of the filled half of the pastry with beaten egg. Fold the pastry over and crimp.
  9. Grease a baking tray with butter and lay on the pastry. Glaze with more beaten egg and cut a steam vent in the centre with a very sharp knife. Be sure to cut through the bacon and in to the haggis.
  10. Bake for around thirty-five minutes until the pastry is beautifully golden.

Completing the Pasty and Making Clapshot and Peppercorn Sauce

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Chopped potato and Swede ready to be boiledBalmoral Chicken pasty is removed from ovenPasty is rested on a wire rackVeg are left to steam and dry out before being mashedPotato and Swede are mashedChives and seasoning are stirred through clapshotBlack peppercorns ready to be crushed in pestle and mortarCrushed peppercorns and mustard are added to creamMaking peppercorn sauce
Chopped potato and Swede ready to be boiled
Chopped potato and Swede ready to be boiled
Balmoral Chicken pasty is removed from oven
Balmoral Chicken pasty is removed from oven
Pasty is rested on a wire rack
Pasty is rested on a wire rack
Veg are left to steam and dry out before being mashed
Veg are left to steam and dry out before being mashed
Potato and Swede are mashed
Potato and Swede are mashed
Chives and seasoning are stirred through clapshot
Chives and seasoning are stirred through clapshot
Black peppercorns ready to be crushed in pestle and mortar
Black peppercorns ready to be crushed in pestle and mortar
Crushed peppercorns and mustard are added to cream
Crushed peppercorns and mustard are added to cream
Making peppercorn sauce
Making peppercorn sauce
  1. The potato and turnip/rutabaga should be peeled, roughly chopped and added to a large pot of cold, salted water. When the pasty has been in the oven for fifteen minutes, bring the water to a boil and simmer for about twenty-five minutes until soft.
  2. Remove the pasty from the oven and carefully lay it on a wire rack with a spatula to rest for about fifteen minutes.
  3. Drain the potato and turnip and return to the empty pot to steam for a few minutes and dry out. Add a little butter and some pepper and mash with a hand masher. Add the chopped chives and stir them through with a spoon.
  4. While the potato and turnip is steaming, crack the peppercorns in a pestle and mortar. Pour the cream in to a small saucepan and add the cracked pepper and Dijon mustard. Put on a low heat, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until the sauce just starts to simmer. Remove from heat.

Plating Up your Meal

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Clapshot is firstly added to serving platesSauce is spooned around clapshotPasty is carefully halved on chopping boardHalf pasty is laid on clapshot bedChives garnish pasty and clapshot for service
Clapshot is firstly added to serving plates
Clapshot is firstly added to serving plates
Sauce is spooned around clapshot
Sauce is spooned around clapshot
Pasty is carefully halved on chopping board
Pasty is carefully halved on chopping board
Half pasty is laid on clapshot bed
Half pasty is laid on clapshot bed
Chives garnish pasty and clapshot for service
Chives garnish pasty and clapshot for service
  1. Divide the clapshot between the two serving plates.
  2. Spoon the sauce carefully around the clapshot.
  3. Cut the pasty in half and carefully place half on top of each portion of clapshot.
  4. Garnish with more chives if required and serve immediately.

Thank You for Visiting and for Reading

5 stars from 4 ratings of this insideout Balmoral Chicken pasty with clapshot

© 2012 Gordon Hamilton

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10 comments

Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 14 months ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you, Ilonagarden. I hope you get the chance to give this a try.


Ilonagarden profile image

Ilonagarden 14 months ago from Ohio

...I would almost be persuaded to try haggis. This recipe does look very tasty.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 3 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, tirelesstraveler. Yes, clapshot is the potato and turnip mix. Your comment inspired me to go to Amazon and see if it sells haggis. I'm (fairly) sure I checked before and it didn't but it certainly does now. OK, it's canned and not fresh but that would have to be expected. Thanks for visiting and commenting and allowing me to discover the fact that Amazon now sells haggis! :)


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 3 years ago from California

I am clueless as to where to buy haggis in the

San Francisco Bay Area. Also assume that the clapshot is the potato and turnip mix.

Must spend more time in the UK.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Mary. Yes, Hub Pages is certainly a learning experience. I encounter the issue with ingredients all the time. One example here is that what is referred to in Scotland as a turnip or a neep, is in England known as a Swede or a Swede turnip and of course in the US is a rutabaga - five different names for the same vegetable! Thanks for visiting and commenting.


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

I learn something new every day on HubPages! You have some ingredients here I've never heard of, but I love to try food from other lands. Thanks.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, toomuchmint. Yes, it is a lot easier to make than it perhaps looks and the plate idea works in any form of related dish. Thank you for visiting and commenting and I hope you try out the plate trick.


toomuchmint profile image

toomuchmint 4 years ago

I saw haggis and was hooked! This is such an interesting, and so easy to make. The trick with the plate is a great tip for any type of pastry, and makes perfect edges so simple. Thanks!


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Paul, thank you very much and I'm delighted you like my ideas. It also makes me happy when I make people want to cook. I hope purists will forgive my tampering to such an extent with a classic dish but I was delighted with the way this turned out.


Paul Edmondson profile image

Paul Edmondson 4 years ago from Burlingame, CA

Your Hubs are incredible. I'm super inspired by them and they make me want to cook. Thanks for sharing these recipes.

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