How to Cook Potato Skins (with Recipes)

Potato Skins are Popular on Many Modern Restaurant Menus

Potato skins were once peeled from the body of the potato and simply discarded, by home cooks and restaurant chefs alike. This tactic not only produced monumental levels of unnecessary waste, it allowed a nourishing and delicious cooking ingredient to simply spoil. A great transformation has taken place for the humble potato skin, however, and they are now commonly served in restaurants at what can be ridiculous and exorbitant prices.

There is nothing difficult about cooking potato skins at home. This page will focus both on the most common ways in which it is possible to cook potato skins and some simple, yet delicious dip and filling recipes with which you may wish to serve the crispy potato skins to your family.

Deep Fried Potato Skins Recipe with Garlic and Dill Soured Cream Dip

Soured cream, fresh dill and garlic form the dip
Soured cream, fresh dill and garlic form the dip
The two ends are firstly sliced off each potato
The two ends are firstly sliced off each potato
The skins are evenly sliced off the potatoes
The skins are evenly sliced off the potatoes
The potato skins are carefully dried on kitchen paper
The potato skins are carefully dried on kitchen paper

This way of cooking potato skins is probably both the most obvious and the most straightforward. In essence, the skins are simply peeled from the raw potatoes and deep fried, with the peeled potatoes left available to be put to alternative use, perhaps for the main course where this dish constitutes an appetizer.

Ingredients per Serving

Two large floury potatoes
1 tbsp low fat soured cream
1 tsp freshly chopped dill leaves
1 clove of garlic
Optional cherry tomatoes and dill sprig for garnishing

Method

Step one is to prepare the dip for the potato skins. Ideally, this should be done a couple of hours in advance and the dip covered and refrigerated until required. This will give the different flavours a chance to properly infuse. Note that it is always best to prepare the dip in a bowl much larger than would appear to be required, as attempting to prepare it in the small serving dish will not allow it to be stirred sufficiently. Add the soured cream to the bowl, peel and grate the garlic in and add the chopped dill before stirring well, covering and refrigerating.

Slice the ends off each potato as shown before carefully cutting the skins off in uniform strips. Dry by pressing between two sheets of kitchen towel. Frying twice achieves best results in terms of crispiness. Fry once in sunflower oil for three to four minutes before draining on kitchen towel and allowing to cool. Fry again for three to four minutes, drain on fresh towel and season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately with the dip and garnish if required.


Crispy Potato Skin Boat with Tuna, Mash and Mayo Stuffing

Metal skewer is carefully inserted lengthwise through the centre of the raw potato
Metal skewer is carefully inserted lengthwise through the centre of the raw potato
The cooked potato is halved lengthwise
The cooked potato is halved lengthwise
The flesh is carefully scooped out of the potato skins
The flesh is carefully scooped out of the potato skins
Potato flesh, tuna and mayo are mixed together
Potato flesh, tuna and mayo are mixed together
Crispy potato skin and scooped out tomato halves are plated
Crispy potato skin and scooped out tomato halves are plated

Baking them in the oven is one of the most common ways of cooking potatoes. In most instances, however, the baked potato skin will either be eaten as it comes out of the oven with the remainder of the potato and a chosen filling, or left uneaten on the plate. This recipe looks at a slightly different way of serving a baked potato with the skin crisped to serve as a boat for a creamy filling.

Ingredients for Two Servings

1 large baking potato
1 tbsp canned tuna
1 tbsp low fat mayo
2 medium tomatoes
1 small can of sweet corn
Salt and white pepper
Freshly chopped celery leaves for garnish

Method

The potato will firstly require to be baked as normal. One little tip you may wish to try when baking potatoes is inserting a metal skewer lengthwise through their centre prior to placing them in to the oven. The skewer conducts heat through the centre of the potato and helps ensure more even cooking. You should still also pierce the potato a few times with a fork to allow steam to escape and prevent the potato from bursting. It should then be placed directly on to the shelf of an oven preheated to 375F/190C.

The potato will take about an hour and a quarter to cook, or an hour and a half for a particularly large potato. When it is done, remove it from the oven wearing protective gloves and the skewer should easily slide free. Careful of the heat, half the potato lengthwise with a sharp knife. The soft flesh of the potato should be scooped out with a teaspoon and added to a bowl, ensuring the skin of each potato half is not breached. The two skins should then be returned to the oven for five to seven minutes while the filling and accompaniments are prepared.

The tuna and the mayo should be added to the potato flesh and seasoned with salt and white pepper. The ingredients should be mixed well to form a smooth paste. This should be used to stuff the crisped potato skin boats when they are removed from the oven.

The tomatoes should be halved by cutting at alternate forty-five degree angles around the circumference with a small paring knife, pushing the knife in to the core with each cut. Gently twisting the two halves in opposite directions should then cause the tomato to easily come apart. The seeds and watery centre can be removed and discarded with a teaspoon before the halves are filled with sweetcorn. The chopped celery leaves - often discarded from a head of celery - make a refreshing change as a herb garnish.

Crispy Potato Skins and More with Potato, Chive and Horseradish Dip

This method of cooking potato skins combines the two previous methods and sees them served with an assortment of other dipping items.

Ingredients

1 large baking potato
1 large parsnip
1 medium carrot
2 stalks of celery
2 tsp hot horseradish sauce
1 tsp chopped chives
Salt and white pepper

Method

The potato is firstly baked precisely as in the above recipe. When it is removed from the oven, it is set aside and covered to cool while the parsnip is prepared. The parsnip should be washed and topped and tailed. The skin should be peeled off in uniform strips which will later be deep fried with the potato skins. The bulk of the parsnip should be sliced in to discs around quarter of an inch thick, seasoned with salt and shallow fried over a medium heat in a little sunflower oil for seven to eight minutes each side until golden and crisp.

The baked potato should be halved and the flesh scooped carefully out in to a bowl. Try to leave some flesh on the skin, around an eighth of an inch thickness if possible. Each potato skin should then be halved lengthwise to leave four fairly large wedges. The parsnip skins are firstly added to the deep frier and after around three minutes, the potato skins join them until all are crisp and golden.

While the skins and parsnip chips complete cooking, the celery stalks should be washed and chopped. The carrot should be peeled or scraped and chopped. The horseradish sauce and chives should be mixed through the potato flesh and seasoned with salt and white pepper.

The potato and parsnip skins and the parsnip chips should be drained on kitchen paper and the dip and dippers arranged for service.

Comments and Feedback

Thank you for your visit to this page. I hope that it has in some way proved inspiring for you and that you will experiment with your own potato skins and dip recipes. Any comments or feedback which you have may be left in the space below.

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28 comments

Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 5 years ago from San Francisco

Oh my gosh, I am so hungry now! These are excellent recipes, and your original photos are splendid! What's more, I have some great news for you- this Hub won the Daily Drawing for Day 7 of the So You Think You Can Write Online contest!! Congrats!!


IzzyM profile image

IzzyM 5 years ago from UK

Wow! And to think we used to throw them away! Great hub :)


akirchner profile image

akirchner 5 years ago from Central Oregon

Looks delish and congrats on the win, Gordon!


lemmyC profile image

lemmyC 5 years ago from UK

Well done Gordon!


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you, Simone. This was a great surprise to wake up to this morning! :)


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you, Izzy, akirchner and lemmyC. It's funny, I well remember the first time I was offered deep fried potato skins. I must have been about fourteen and I thought it was a joke! Fortunately, I did try them and loved them...


top-bannana profile image

top-bannana 5 years ago from England

yum yum, thank you for the lovely recipes and ideas, now i could just eat some potato skins for lunch. mmh mm.


viking305 profile image

viking305 5 years ago from Ireland

Wow this was a very surprising recipe. I do indeed throw away potato skins but not anymore lol


lakeerieartists profile image

lakeerieartists 5 years ago from Cleveland, OH

Wow! Really great recipes, and I also love the presentation with the how to pictures down the side. Just the dips alone are interesting. :)


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you, top-bannana, viking305 and lakeerieartists. I hope that you enjoy them if you try them.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 5 years ago from Yorkshire

hi Gordon

yummi yummy, I use up any oven cooked jacket potatoes, cutting them in slices and frying in a little oil.

good hub Gordon

cheers Tony


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Tony

Good way to use them up instead of binning them.

Cheers.


Karanda profile image

Karanda 5 years ago from Australia

Potatoes baked in the oven with the skin left on has always been a family favourite (topped with sour cream and chives). I would never have thought of using the skins in this way. Thanks for sharing such a useful tip and great recipes.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you for your comment and your visit Karanda. I am glad that the suggestions appeal to you and I hope very much that you will try them and enjoy them.


Les Trois Chenes profile image

Les Trois Chenes 5 years ago from Videix, Limousin, South West France

In my family we always peeled potatoes and never ate the skins. I was a student in a shared flat when the mother of one of my flatmates cooked us a meal. She didn't peel her potatoes, and I haven't peeled a potato since (except for 'special occasions'). Waste of food, waste of nutrition, waste of time. Many thanks for these very good ideas.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you, Les Trois Chenes

You are so right. I tend only to peel potatoes when I particularly want the skins to cook separately or am making such as mash. Otherwise, I like to leave them in place.


Native Gardener profile image

Native Gardener 5 years ago from Topanga Canyon, California

Good idea to use the potato skins. People forget the healthiest part of the potato is at the skin. Thanks for the recipes.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Native Gardener

Thank you for your comment and visit. You are so right about the skins. Just like apples and so much more. A shame more people don't realise.


SUSANJK profile image

SUSANJK 5 years ago from Florida

I will add this to my recipe file. Thanks.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you, Susan. I hope you enjoy the recipes.


Michael Willis profile image

Michael Willis 5 years ago from Arkansas

I will definitely try the potato skin recipe. Is there a specific potato you prefer? Red, Idaho or other?


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Michael

Thanks for the visit and comment.

The main criteria is to use a floury rather than waxy potato. If you use a waxy potato, you are more likely to feel as though you are chewing gum, rather than crunching on a beautifully crisp potato skin.

Idaho in the USA should be good and a safe bet to work, or Red Rooster (do you have them?)

Apologies that I am not too up on US varieties. Here in the UK, I use King Edwards or Maris Pipers.

Hope you give them a try and enjoy,

Gordon


stephhicks68 profile image

stephhicks68 5 years ago from Bend, Oregon

Great hub and so thorough! Potatoes are usually off-limits for me as a diabetic, but I'm sure my family would LOVE the recipes. Best, Steph


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thank you, Steph. I didn't know that potatoes were generally off-limits to diabetics - and I don't think my diabetic Dad does either! I'll let him know - thanks for the info.


stessily 5 years ago

Gordon Hamilton: Every single one of these recipes sounds delicious. I appreciate the time you have taken to present clear steps with great photos. My variation on the potato skins stuffed with tuna is to substitute peas for the corn.

Thank you for reminding me of one of my favorite, favorite foods from childhood: baked potato skins.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Stessily, thank you very much for visiting and commenting and I am glad the recipes bring back memories for you. Peas definitely sound like a great substitute for the corn.


Darren Y 3 years ago

The shavings off the potatoes, can they be cooked in the oven rather than deep fried?


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 3 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Darren. Yes, they could, but make sure they are added to hot oil and not cold or they will be yucky and soggy. Thanks for visiting and commenting.

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