In Vetro Meat – Test Tube Meat – Shmeat -- Are You Ready For It?

The First Schmeatburger Has Arrived At a London Event!

The very first shmeatburger was flipped out of its petri dish and into a frying pan at a London event Monday, August 5, 2013, before hundreds of reporters and television cameras. I promised to add an update when this event took place and here it is.

Reuters reports that fewer than a handful of people actually got to taste what some are calling the Frankenburger because there was not enough for the hundreds of people present to all give it try.

Mark Post of Maastricht University in the Netherlands, the biologist who created the shmeat over the last five years, was of course in attendance in order to present his invention to the world. He was one of a very few who had a taste.

The burger was prepared before television viewers who watched as 2 taste-testers and Mark Post sampled the finished product. Breadcrumbs, egg powder, salt, beet juice, and saffron were combined with the lab-meat that contained no fat of its own before it was fried to look like the photo provided below.

Mark Post told reporters it was “a good start” when asked how it tasted. The taste-testers were also notably reserved in their opinions on the taste. One might surmise from the conservative tone of the taster’s reactions that indeed, there is more work to do before shmeat is ready for marketing.

The full article follows this update and the photo below.

The very first shmeatburger!

Taste-testers at the event were somewhat reserved with their opinions of this first burger.
Taste-testers at the event were somewhat reserved with their opinions of this first burger. | Source

A New Innovation Is About to Shake Up Our Comfort Zone Again and Change What We Have Always Done

The first 5-ounce in vetro burger has in fact already been made. Dr. Mark Post in the Netherlands has already grown an in vetro burger at a cost of about $325,000 (entirely financed by a private donor). The shmeatburger is being preserved in order to introduce it properly to the world at a fitting event that I will have to report when it comes to pass.

Are your dinner table and your palate ready for meat grown in a test tube? Well, get ready because if scientists have their way, it will not be long before in vetro meat will be in your supermarket. It could be as soon as just a year or two from now, so start setting your appetite for it.

The age of Star Trek has arrived. The time when real animals are raised for food is about to be over, so get ready. No more corporate pig farms and chicken farms. No more Texas beef cattle. Does that mean we can be done with all the antibiotics and other chemicals that are injected into livestock to keep them sort of healthy long enough to get them to market? Let’s hope so.

Why the Star Trek comparison? Star Trek introduced replicators, remember? There were no gardens or farms, and no feedlots or slaughterhouses on the Star Ship Enterprise; they had replicators instead. Everything that was discarded was recycled into whatever someone needed whether it was a tool, clothing, or food, or whatever. The replicator reorganized the molecules/atoms of discarded items (trash) into something else. Maybe cheesecake.

There are other names applied to in vetro meat, which I will list here so you will recognize them if you hear them. “In vitro meat, [is] also known as cultured meat, cruelty-free meat, test tube meat, tubesteak, or shmeat. [It] is an animal flesh product that has never been part of a complete, living animal. [Other] alternative names include hydroponic meat, vat-grown meat, victimless meat, and vitro meat,” (Wikipedia).

You should be aware that in vetro meat is real meat, not substitute protein such as vegetarians sometimes eat that looks like meat, but is not.

Test Tube Meat Is On the Way To a Supermarket Near You

Scientist holding a petri dish that contains a small piece of in vetro meat.
Scientist holding a petri dish that contains a small piece of in vetro meat. | Source

Some Fruits and Vegetables That Are Genetically Engineered

Tomatoes, genetically engineered to last longer before spoilage can occur, and to have tougher skins for traveling more successfullu.
Tomatoes, genetically engineered to last longer before spoilage can occur, and to have tougher skins for traveling more successfullu. | Source
Bananas.  Some are genetically engineered to have thicker tougher skin to travel better and also to last longer before spoilage can occur.
Bananas. Some are genetically engineered to have thicker tougher skin to travel better and also to last longer before spoilage can occur. | Source
Oranges.  Some are genetically engineered to have thicker tougher skin to travel better.
Oranges. Some are genetically engineered to have thicker tougher skin to travel better. | Source

Considering the great strides science has made of late, it should not surprise anyone that meat is being grown in test tubes, and will before much more time pas

The idea of test tube meat sounded pretty disgusting to me initially. I do not eat a lot of meat anyway. I am not quite a vegetarian, but I try to avoid eating meat as much as possible.

Then I heard the arguments in favor of in vetro meat.

Currently it takes 13 to 16 pounds of grain and grass and feed along with 2,500 gallons of water to get a single pound of beef! Yes, these are figures from scientists. Then there is all the pollution from the transportation and processing, etc., and more expenses incurred from all that.

I have known for a long time that the process of running the vegetation through an animal before eating it myself was very inefficient and expensive.

Of course meat carries more pathogens that will make a person sick or even kill a person than vegetation does. Hopefully infected meat, vegetables, and fruits will all be a thing of the past when in vetro meat becomes readily available.

When vegetables or fruits become poisonous it is usually from being contaminated by meat or some other animal product (animal feces for example). I have personally observed workers in a grocery store packaging ground beef and sliced watermelon on the same table with no divider between them.

Sometimes the problem is animal feces getting into the meat during the slaughtering process, and then later contaminating plant products that are handled improperly by using the same equipment to process the vegetables or fruits without cleaning the equipment first.

Sometimes contamination of fruits and vegetables occurs because they were handled by dirty hands of a worker that did not wash his or her hands after handling contaminated meat or other unsanitary things. There are many ways fruits and vegetables can be contaminated by meat or other things.

Regardless of how meat sometimes gets contaminated and deadly as a result, those occurrences should be minimized when in vetro meat becomes readily available. There are a lot of advantages to growing meat in a laboratory over slaughtering live animals that cost a fortune to raise and care for.

Having grown up on a small family dairy farm, I know exactly how much work and money goes into even a small herd of cattle, a couple of hundred chickens, or a few hogs.

Raising all those animals for slaughter takes acres of land, tons of grain and grass, and gallons and gallons and more gallons of water. More water is required at slaughter, and it is a messy process that once viewed, often turns meat eaters into vegetarians. From my perspective there really is not anything humane about the butchering process.

Learn More About In Vetro Meat

Advantages of Growing Meat Instead of Raising Meat

While I do agree that there are many advantages and improvements to be had if meat can be successfully ‘grown’ in more sanitary conditions than any live animal can ever be raised in, I am still not completely sold on in vetro meat. I am not convinced that it is sufficiently more healthful than traditionally obtained meat.

In vetro meat should be free of pathogens if grown and handled properly. It should be free of antibiotics and other chemicals injected into animals to keep them on their feet until they can get to market.

In vetro meat should with time be more economical and efficient to grow. It should produce far less pollution and take up far less real estate in the growing process. In time it should cost consumers less and be more healthful. It will definitely not have the texture meat lovers are accustomed to, and from appearances will look more like spam.

The question I have, is will all these things come to pass? Will growing meat using the in vetro process be truly more efficient and healthful in practice? Or will less than healthy chemicals be required to make the process work because it is in a laboratory of sorts instead of being created the natural way?

Right now growing even a small piece of in vetro meat is a painfully slow process. Will chemicals be introduced to speed things up? Will we be exchanging the antibiotics and other chemicals now used on livestock for other chemicals that serve a different purpose, but that are no more healthful?

I confess, the healthful part is what I wonder about more than anything else. While solving the health issues meat has now, will there be new health issues with this new method of creating meant and will those issues be better or worse?

Genetically Engineered Holstein Dairy Cow

This cow has been genetically engineered to produce more milk.  Note her bag is huge compared to normal cows putting extreme stress on her back and legs.  Some of these cattle cannot stand up.  Animal cruelty?
This cow has been genetically engineered to produce more milk. Note her bag is huge compared to normal cows putting extreme stress on her back and legs. Some of these cattle cannot stand up. Animal cruelty? | Source

Speak Your Mind

How do you feel about all these new kinds of meat on the market, or soon to be in the grocery store and in restaurants?

  • Some of them are OK, but I don't really feel comfortable with all of them.
  • That's it, I'm going to become a vegetarian!
  • The FDA knows best. If they say it's safe I will eat it.
  • Shmeat, test tube meat, or whatever they want to call it sounds good to me.
  • I don't like the idea of genetically engineering our food, plant or animal based.
  • I don't like the idea of cloned meat or genetically engineered meat, but shmeat sounds OK.
  • I hate all of this weird stuff and I wish we could just have normal raised meat the way it was 20 years ago.
See results without voting

Other Types of Meat Already On the Market

Cloned Meat

Cloned meat was approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in January of 2008, but many cattlemen and some veterinarians admitted and agreed that cloned meat had been in the supermarkets for a number of years prior to approval.

It was not then nor is it now legally required for producers or marketers of cloned meat to label the meat as cloned. It is thought that a lot of Americans have already eaten and continue to eat cloned meat unaware.

What is the reason for cloning cattle and other animals? Well, it seems that a lot of people had been unhappy because the meat they purchased was not dependably of good quality – that is, it often times would be tough or grisly, and either too fat or not fat enough. Buying meat that was just right was a hit or miss proposition. Cloning their best quality meat animals seemed like the way to make certain the meat was always of the best quality. Cloning beef cattle is therefore a quality control issue. Better quality meat means more money for the producers and fewer complaints -- happier customers.

Genetically Engineered Animals

Ron Epstein writing for San Francisco State University says that prominent scientists do not believe sufficient testing has been done to be sure that genetically engineered food products are safe. Genetically engineered meat especially, may cause serious allergic reactions, and it may increase antibiotic resistance among other things.

Labeling genetically engineered meat and other foods as genetically modified has never been required in either the U.S. or Canada. Lots of people have been eating them for many years now, most probably without knowing it.

Why have scientists been modifying the genes of animals and plants in the first place? What are the purpose and the benefit?

Some animals have been genetically modified so that they will produce more milk or more muscle tissue, which translates into more money for farmers and processers.

Some plants have been genetically modified so that they will be more insect or disease resistant, or so that they will have a tougher skin (tomatoes, bananas) making them withstand the rigors of shipping better.

Some fruits have been altered genetically so that they will not spoil as quickly. All of these changes mean more money for producers, manufacturers, and wholesalers, partly through less waste and spoilage.

It will be interesting to see what my readers think about all this. Some of these things are no longer new and have been on the market for several years, and some are about to debut in the next couple of years.

Will you continue to eat meat not knowing if it is natural or one of the products written about here? Does it upset you at all that these different products are not labeled? In vetro meat probably will not be labeled either. How do you feel about that?

References and More Information

Reuters.com reports first in vitro burger

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/05/us-science-meat-in-vitro-idUSBRE9740PL20130805


New York Times – Engineering the Invetro Burger including a video

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/14/science/engineering-the-325000-in-vitro-burger.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0


ABC NEWS - Tissue Engineered Meat In a Test Tube

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2013/05/hot-off-the-grill-test-tube-burger/


CNN-Lab-Grown Meat

http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/13/tech/innovation/lab-grown-meat

Wikipedia On Invetro-Meat

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_vitro_meat


Reuters

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/01/30/us-food-meat-laboratory-feature-idUSTRE70T1WZ20110130


USA Today

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/environment/2009-04-21-carbon-diet_N.htm?csp=YahooModule_News


Scientific American

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=tissue-engineered-leather-could-be-mass-produced-by-2017


References for Cloned and Genetically Engineered Meat

The FDA on Cloned Livestock

http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/FDAVeterinarianNewsletter/ucm110044.htm


Whole Foods

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/mission-values/environmental-stewardship/cloned-meat-qa


The Washington Post on Cloned Meat In the Market for Many Years Already

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/15/AR2008011501555.html?hpid=topnews


The Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2008/01/15/DI2008011502270.html


Discovery.com

http://news.discovery.com/tech/cloned-meat-enters-food-chain.htm


USA Today

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/science/genetics/2008-09-18-genetically-engineered-animals-food_N.htm


Howstuffworks.com

http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/cloned-meat.htm


San Francisco State University on Genetic Engineering of Food Products

http://online.sfsu.edu/rone/GEessays/Why%20You%20Should%20Be%20Concerned%20About%20GEF.htm

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105 comments

Au fait profile image

Au fait 20 months ago from North Texas Author

Ezzly, thank you for reading, and for sharing your thoughts and concerns on this issue. They don't have to label our food correctly anymore or advise what's in it because they know most of us would reject it if we knew what was in it. You may be right about different methods causing health issues for people. They won't come clean about that either even if they know it for sure.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 20 months ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for commenting Shyron. Peggy W., has recently told me about something called meat glue. I haven't had time to really look into it much, but the little I've seen says it's used to turn little pieces of meat (pink slime?) into bigger cuts like steaks, roasts, etc.

Shouldn't be long and they can add a bit of flavoring to cardboard and glue it into a hunk of meat, paint it nice to look real. The 3-D printers should be able to prepare dinner before much time passes . . .

Today was a crazy day. Guess there has to be one of those every so often. Hope all is well at your house . . .


ezzly profile image

ezzly 20 months ago

I absolutely agree , take gmo for example , there was a company (whole foods I think) that got in trouble recently in the states for claiming to be non gmo and now the FDA are saying it is virtually impossible to claim a food as being non gmo ... I think a lot of messing has been done with our food chain and it's causing allergies such as asthma which is widespread now where it wasn't say 30 years ago or so and so many people have an intolerance to gluten now because the wheat isn't the same as the natural source of years ago.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 20 months ago from North Texas Author

Ezzly, thank you for the votes, the Tweet, and for sharing your experience with marketers that didn't inform customers of the contents of their food. Here they won't tell us either when there is pink slime, in vetro meat, genetically engineered meat, or anything else because people wouldn't buy it if they knew, and so they are sneaky about it. There are problems with vegetables and fruits too, so just going vegetarian may not solve the problem.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 20 months ago

Au fait, I am back to re-read this. It turns my stomach to think of all the Sh**tmeat that is out there already. As I have stated before this reminds me of the movie Soylent Green. I just read about how they want to cut food stamps again, The people I am talking about don't even want the people on food stamps to be able to eat this vetro meat.

Hope your day is going well.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 20 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W, thank you for commenting and sharing about the glued meat. I've never heard of it before and will now have to look into it. I have written about how Pink Slime Turns Dog Food Into People Food, but this glued stuff is something new to me. I'm not really all that concerned about the shmeat or the pink slime either.

Vegetarians have less to worry about regarding meat, but scientists are messing with vegetables and fruits all the time too, genetically engineering them. I don't think anyone's food is safe from Big Brother anymore.

Thanks for the share!


ezzly profile image

ezzly 20 months ago

As always a well researched piece ! Over here there was a scandal of supermarkets using horse meat instead of cows meat in ready meal foods such as lasagne for example. People were so annoyed because they weren't given the choice as they felt lied to. The only way forward is to be well informed about what goes into your mouth! Voted up and sharing on twitter.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 20 months ago from Houston, Texas

Reading about this, while it may be of concern because we do not know the long term effects, is not as bothersome to me as learning about the glued meat that we are unknowingly eating. That can potentially make one very ill. Mary615 wrote about glued meat and pink slime and to me it is very disturbing that this type of thing is foisted off on us. I guess vegetarians are the only ones who need not be concerned with this type of tomfoolery. Sharing once again.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 21 months ago from North Texas Author

Peachpurple, thank you for stopping by. If you read this article carefully, and in it's entirety, you surly know that avoiding fast food will not help you avoid invetro meat.


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 21 months ago from Home Sweet Home

I don't eat much fast food either


Au fait profile image

Au fait 22 months ago from North Texas Author

Patricia (Pstraubie48), thank you for reading and commenting on this article! If you eat any meat at all you can not be certain you aren't eating shmeat. It won't be labeled in the grocery store. Restaurants and processing plants don't have to list it as what it is on the ingredient list -- many restaurants don't have one anyway. They know if it were labeled many of us wouldn't buy it, so not on the label. Big brother looking out for us . . .

Thank you for the angels and back to you.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 22 months ago from sunny Florida

This is very intriguing. However I am not much of a meat eater any way so perhaps I will just forego this.

Angels are on the way to you today ps


Au fait profile image

Au fait 2 years ago from North Texas Author

PegCole17, thank you for reading and sharing your thoughts on this issue. As you already realize, there are lots of things in our food supply that we are not informed about. Recently some members of Congress determined that we are too stupid to understand the issues of food products that have been altered in one way or another and so they are going to decide for us what is best for us. That is truly scary.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

This really does encourage some deep thinking as to the sources of our food. You've done a great job of presenting the possibilities here and informing the reader of what's coming in our future. Yep, Star Trek always seemed too distant to be real, but now, not so much.

Like you, I have dramatically cut down on the amount of meat in my diet and if I had to raise my own, I would definitely be a vegetarian. The veggie meat substitutes are like having three slices of bread for a sandwich so they are not an adequate substitute for a real hamburger. At least, not for me.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 2 years ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W, thank you for sharing your thoughts on this issue and for sharing and Google+ing it. We cannot know the source or type of our meat. Genetically engineered meat and cloned meat have been on the market for years already and most of us have probably eaten it without even knowing. The law doesn't require meat to be labeled according to it's origin. So unless shmeat looks different somehow, we will be eating it one of these days unaware.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago

No wonder people are becoming Vegans. Au fait, you did a fantastic on the research.

Voted up, UAI and shared. I would pin it but I have it pinned so many times.

Blessings and hugs

my dear friend.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

That is the problem. The same thing happens with new medications that are brought forth into the marketplace after supposedly much testing to determine that they are safe. Sometimes years later they are yanked off of the market due to horrific adverse effects sometimes even causing death.

I would hate to think that smeat would do this, but who can accurately predict something that may take decades or even a generation to show true causal effects. We are guinea pigs in many instances unknowingly.

Will Google+ this and once again share.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 2 years ago from North Texas Author

CraftytotheCore, thank you for sharing your thoughts. They don't have to do what they're doing to the cow, but chooses to do it out of greed. They want to make more milk by feeding fewer cows to produce it. They don't care how cruel they are to the animal to make that happen. Same is true with meat production and many other mass productions relating to living animals.

The fact is that it is cheaper to eat the vegetation one's self than it is to run it through the cow, pig, or chicken first, then butcher the animal and eat the animal. Vegetable protein is just as nutritious and healthful, indeed more so, and would save so much cruelty to animals and pollution to our only planet if we stopped getting our protein from animals.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 2 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Peggy W for sharing that news story and your thoughts on this subject. Yes it does take a lot to produce a pound of meat --

"Currently it takes 13 to 16 pounds of grain and grass and feed along with 2,500 gallons of water to get a single pound of beef! . . . Then there is all the pollution from the transportation and processing, etc., and more expenses incurred from all that." If shmeat is all they are hoping it will be or say it is, it would be a great development, but so many things seem to have negatives that don't show themselves until much later when the damage is done . . .


CraftytotheCore profile image

CraftytotheCore 2 years ago

I had never heard of test tube meat. But more importantly, how sad for the cow up there in that photo. This is one of those topics that leaves me thinking there's got to be a better way. I'm guilty of turning my eye to the truth of what it takes these days to feed a growing world population. We hear how good milk is for us but I never heard what they had to do to the cow to get the milk.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

On the Today Show just a day or two ago the regulars there were asked to taste from a plate of real chicken and real beef and ones that were engineered to taste like them from a combination of the right kind of amino acids and other things that supposedly gave the "meat" a higher protein factor, less fat and would be supposedly better for us to eat.

Without exception all of the Today Show folks picked the engineered "meat" as being real and having more flavor. They were astounded! Right now it was reported that it is slightly higher priced than the real meat.

Supposedly this could help the world hunger problem because it definitely takes more food to feed a cow, for example, than the meat gotten from that cow. All of that grain could be feeding people instead.

If they are SURE that there would not be adverse effects later on (science project gone awry) this could ultimately be great news. I am waiting on the side lines to see. The problem is that oftentimes it takes years or even decades to discover such things.

It sounds good on the surface! Pinning this to Awesome Hubpages. I believe the board I used to pin this in the past was Do you know this?


Au fait profile image

Au fait 2 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for stopping by Glenda. Hope you found this of interest.


glenda 2 years ago

This is very informative. I am a friend of Shyron she said I should read you stuff.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 2 years ago from North Texas Author

Moonlake, thank you for pinning this article!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America

Came back to pin this to my Hub board. Thanks for sharing all this information.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Happyboomernurse, for reading and sharing your thoughts on this issue. I always put my references in my articles when there are any so that people can explore further if they want to.

Appreciate the votes and the share on FB and with your followers too. Agree with all that you say regarding shmeat. The more I learn about it and think about it, the less enthusiastic I get about it. ;)


Happyboomernurse profile image

Happyboomernurse 3 years ago from South Carolina

Am I ready for in vetro shmeat? Absolutely not, for all the reasons that you outlined, especially this one: "I confess, the healthful part is what I wonder about more than anything else. While solving the health issues meat has now, will there be new health issues with this new method of creating meant and will those issues be better or worse?"

I have lived long enough to see what was originally claimed to be scientific, modern day miracles turn into debacles that had totally unexpected, terrible effects on our health.

However, you did a great job of enumerating benefits/ vs potential and as yet unknown risks in regards to in vetro shmeat and I love the fact that you included resources.

Voted up, interesting and useful, plus shared with followers and posted on Facebook. Plus voted up, useful and interesting.

Hugs,

Gail


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Shyron, for commenting and sharing your thoughts!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Hey Sam! (samowhamo) Thank you for reading and sharing your thoughts on this issue.

While it's true that meat is in fact part of a dead animal, I don't see the point of saying such ugly things as the person you described said. I have joked on occasion with other people who knew I was joking, that I would like another slice of cow or that I like my pork chop well done so it doesn't oink when I stab it with my fork, etc.

But people have been eating meat for centuries. In fact God didn't give humans permission to eat meat until after the flood, but heathens ate it before that. Regardless of that, I agree that if people do not want their diets criticized they shouldn't be so critical of other people's diets either.

Jesus said, "It's not what you put into your mouth that you should be so concerned with, but what comes out of it. In other words, these people who are worried about other people's diets ought instead to be concerned with the ugly, critical, mean words coming OUT of their own.

I don't know much about Japan, but I believe I have heard theirs is own of the more healthful diets in the world.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

I don't think I can eat this meat. But I do like steak, chicken and turkey meat.

According to the Bible, God created the animals for people to eat and that is good enough for me.

This is a very interesting article.


samowhamo profile image

samowhamo 3 years ago

Hey Au Fait what is your opinion people who judge others who eat meat. I was reading an article earlier today called 20 reasons not to eat meat and one commenters said this.

(mihaelaotp .... Very good info.. I agree with everything you put. People know what you write is the truth, but they just like to eat dead animals and they have to have an excuse to make them feel better about eating rotting meat.. and YES people stop being STUPID cause that's exactly what it is ROTTING MEAT, mix with God knows what!! but please go ahead and enjoy....you really think its enough real fresh meat out there to feed the world in this age..wow how sad or you..:)

Vegans don't like it when people judge their dietary choices yet they think its ok to judge other. I personally don't judge people by what they eat and don't eat that's not my business but what some of these people probably don't realize is that there are places in the world where animal products are the best food source people have notably Japan. As far as I know the Japanese diet is made up almost entirely of fish since fish is their best food source (if I remember correctly). They can farm in Japan yes but as far as I know there are not many crops that they can produce to feed their population (though I could be wrong about all of this though).


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Peggy W for tweeting this hub! Won't be long and you'll be able to 'Transport' or 'beam' some shmeat onto your dinner table. ;)


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Sheila (sgbrown) for reading, voting on and sharing this hub and especially for sharing your thoughts on this subject! It's bad enough when things are put in our food supply, but then they don't even tell us when they do it, and don't label it, because they know a lot of us wouldn't buy it or eat it if we knew. I try to avoid meat as much as possible because that is where most food borne illness comes from when there's a problem.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Tillsontitan for reading, voting on, and sharing this article and for your high praise.

There is fake bacon and it's not bad taste-wise, but you might not like the texture. I use the fake bacon bits in my soups because they are not only not animal product, I think they actually taste better.

However, I am not a vegetarian mainly because it's so inconvenient. I sometimes eat meat but don't go out of my way for it. It really is the basis for most of our food borne disease, it's expensive, less efficient and economical to eat the veggies after running them through an animal, and there are other advantages to not eating meat.

Even so, I'm just not into making a big issue about meat. People will do what they will do and I have other issues to attend. If someone is kind enough to invite me to dinner I don't like to say, make sure to leave out the meat. I don't believe 'they' will stop slaughtering animals just because I quit eating meat and I don't think enough people will ever join me in not eating meat to convince 'them' to stop raising and slaughtering animals. Therefore the raising of animals purely to slaughter them will continue.

Frankly, I'm more concerned with people who have nothing to eat than with what people are eating, so long as what they're eating isn't mud and twigs or other un-edibles. Thanks again for stopping by. Always appreciate when you do.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Cloverleaffarm, thank you for stopping by!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you catmalone for reading and sharing your thoughts on this issue. Manufacturers are mainly looking to produce a product for the least amount of money that will get them a good return. Test tube meat won't be labeled anymore than the genetically engineered or cloned meats are labeled now, so you won't likely even know you're eating it.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Giving this another tweet. Star Trec here we come!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

ChristinS, thank you for reading this article and sharing your thoughts on this issue. I really believe vegetarianism is more healthful and economical in more ways than one and every living thing, including our planet which I consider to be a living thing, would be better off if humans were vegetarian. Everyone embracing vegetarianism would make such a profound difference in this world!

I'm not a vegetarian but I do try to eat as little meat as possible. It's checking ingredients to make sure there are no animal products in convenience foods or ingredients used for different recipes where I find the most inconvenience of trying to be vegetarian.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you rajan jolly for stopping by and sharing this article!


sgbrown profile image

sgbrown 3 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

All this chemically engineered stuff really scares the hell out of me. Who knows what kind of problems we will have from it years down the road. We may become "chemically engineered" with touch skin and huge breasts! I'll stick to eating my venison, turkey and "home grown" fish. I rarely buy meat and now will likely buy even less.

This is an excellent article with information everyone should have. Voting this up, useful and sharing!


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 3 years ago from New York

In all honesty after reading this I am totally ambiguous. Anything genetically engineered must have an effect we are not yet aware of, yet the idea of not slaughtering animals is appealing. Yes, I am a meat eater. When I was a child that's all I did eat. Can they make smacon that tastes like bacon?

This was a great article aufait and your news reporting style leaves the reader to make choices. Well done my friend.

Voted up, useful, interesting, and shared.


cloverleaffarm profile image

cloverleaffarm 3 years ago from The Hamlet of Effingham

I always heard of it as In Vitro meat. Good article, though.


catmalone profile image

catmalone 3 years ago

Very well put together article with interesting information. I’m not to kin with test tube meat, but this will definitely keep me on the alert what’s coming to our groceries stores and restaurants. It seems that as the population grows food producers are trying to grow things faster in larger quantities to feed more people not realizing the quality is being taking away.


ChristinS profile image

ChristinS 3 years ago from Midwest

This is very interesting. It also kind of reaffirms my commitment to vegetarianism ;). The thought is really disgusting to me - but it was cool to read about! You never know what people are going to come up with :)


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

Very interesting and informative. Sharing this.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Deborah-Diane for reading, commenting, and sharing this article! Yes one must really keep their eye on things to know what's in them nowadays. With pollution being the sort of thing that isn't readily visible and it's all through our water and air, I don't see how it can be kept out of the soil and into pretty much all the food we eat.

As for meat, already everyone is eating cloned and/or genetically engineered meat and they don't even know it! No labeling required so there's no way to know.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Lacey Taplin, thank you for reading, commenting, and voting on this hub! Expect the shmeat will soon be in the processed foods and restaurants before long and keep in mind they don't have to label it by law. So if you eat meat, chances are good you're already eating the cloned and genetically engineered meat.


Deborah-Diane profile image

Deborah-Diane 3 years ago from Orange County, California

Definitely sharing this with my followers. Test tube meat ... I think we are all going to have to go back to raising our own food if we want to be sure we are eating the real thing!


Lacey Taplin profile image

Lacey Taplin 3 years ago from Highlands Ranch, CO

Very interesting hub. I had seen something about test tub meat on the Science Channel but only caught part of it. Genetically modified food is pretty freaky to me. Voting up!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for stopping by Shyron!

The first shmeatburger has been fried and eaten at an event in London on Monday this week! I have a new photo of the finished product and an update on this article that includes what taste-testers thought about the new burger.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

LKMore01, thank you for reading, voting on, and commenting on this hub. Given that cloned and engineered meat is already in our diet and we don't know which is which, I'm sure this shmeat will soon be there too -- without warning.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Shyron, for your tireless support and friendship. In fact people can suggest HOtD if they want to. There's something in the Learning Center on how to go about that I'm pretty sure.

You mean to say the secret food stuff was people? Don't give them any ideas. I think we're close to them turning people into dog food as it is, just to get rid of the food stamp program!


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

Au fait, I think this could be Pink Slime re-warmed. I also think I will starve to death.

This is really interesting and I will go and share it.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Levertis Steele, thank you for reading and sharing your thoughts on this issue, and for sharing this article with others too. Agree with most of what you say and especially with your observation that the cow is abused. Many cows today that are given growth hormone to enlarge their bags and productivity are abused to where they can't even stand up.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for sharing Peggy W. Agree, but of course they won't label the shmeat as it should be any more than they're labeling the engineered and cloned meat now.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Rose-the-planner, thank you for reading and commenting, voting on and sharing this article. Appreciate you sharing your concerns about this new meat that will soon be hitting our grocery shelves and dinner tables too.

I think what's wrong with the picture is that the genetically engineered products are not being labeled so we can make choices for ourselves.


samowhamo profile image

samowhamo 3 years ago

Don't worry Au Fait it wont spoil my meal at least it doesn't taste any different thank goodness for that. :)


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Sam (samowhamo) thank you for commenting on this hub and for voting on it. The reason genetically engineered and cloned meats are not labeled as such is that 'they' know that most of us wouldn't buy it. Not to spoil your meal, but chicken is engineered too. :)


LKMore01 profile image

LKMore01 3 years ago

Voted up and interesting au fait. There was quite new and disturbing information in your HUB. Thank you for sharing this research and enlightening your readers.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

Au fait, I am back to re-read this. It turns my stomach to think of all the Sh**tmeat that is out there already. This reminds me of the movie Soylent Green about an overpopulated futuristic Earth, a New York police detective finds himself marked for murder by government agents when he gets too close to a bizarre state secret involving the origins of a revolutionary and needed new foodstuff. (humans)

As with all your hubs this really should be HOTD. Voted-up, shared and pinned. I wish we could vote on HOTD


Levertis Steele profile image

Levertis Steele 3 years ago from Southern Clime

samowhamo,

That is a sad truth, but some of us are trying to do better, I think! I hope.


samowhamo profile image

samowhamo 3 years ago

@Levertis Steele

That reminds me of a saying I heard once (Animals are not evil they are just hungry by nature herbivores and carnivores. The only animal that is truly evil is the human animal.)


Levertis Steele profile image

Levertis Steele 3 years ago from Southern Clime

I will forget trying to limit my meat intake. I am vegan all the way! Maybe.

Some Christians and non-Christians have taught the health message for eons, and many have followed, but not nearly enough.

One would think that cloning meat animals and growing it in labs would be enough to turn people off, but the marketers understand well the human animal.

“Gradually feed it to them, and they will learn to love it.”

"Ok, since I have been eating it all the time and didn't know it, what the heck?"

Human beings will eat cloned mean, lab-grown meat, and anything else anyone who appears smart conjures up. When I think about all of the strange meats that people eat already, I know that they will soon be taken by these recent inventions. It is on! Haggis, conch, opossum, gator tail, shark fin, please! If people would eat animals that are subject to be full of human body parts, the only thing left to eat is human flesh, and I think many have helped themselves to that, too. "Human animal" is an appropriate name, I believe.

What an interesting hub! I had heard bits and pieces about cloning, but I did not know much about the lab meat. Thanks for the information. I will share, too.

The poor cow above is an abused animal. Sad.


rose-the planner profile image

rose-the planner 3 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

WOW.............this is definitely an amazing, insightful article! I have to tell you, I am really starting to consider giving up meat especially after reading this, lol! I find the concept of In vetro meat questionable but with cloned meat and genetically engineered animals already on the market, you know that test tube meat will be coming to our tables soon enough. I don't know, there is something terribly wrong with this picture. Thank you for sharing another awesome article. (Voted Up).

-Rose


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Came back to share this informative hub again. At least if they label the foods we purchase or plan to eat, we have a choice in the matter!


samowhamo profile image

samowhamo 3 years ago

I love certain kinds of meat (especially chicken its my favorite food) but the idea of genetically engineered meat is enough to make a lot of people say no thanks I mean nobody wants to eat food that was created genetically by humans but unless they label it you can't tell.

Voted up and interesting.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Kasman for reading, sharing your thoughts, voting on and sharing this article with your followers. I agree with you entirely.

I'm not sure this will be as wonderful as promoted. I really dislike that 'they' are putting genetically engineered and cloned meat in our restaurant and processed foods without telling us, and even putting it in the meat coolers at the grocery store without labeling it as what it is.


Kasman profile image

Kasman 3 years ago from Bartlett, Tennessee

I'm a fan of Star Trek, so reading this article was naturally appealing to me. I'm kind of on the fence about this honestly. On the one hand, I can see the appeal and the benefits of this but also with all the corruption that goes along with our FDA and USDA we're finding more out about lately....I don't know if I trust it. We're already seeing the effects of Monsanto food on our populace, I'm not sure test tube food is a great next step yet...maybe I'm wrong.

I could also see how it could definitely reduce waste, pollution, animal cruelty, etc. It's a tight line to walk. Great piece, very thoughtful and I'm voting up and sharing!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Bobby (Diogenes) for stopping by this article. Glad your weather is to your liking. It's too hot here for me. Upper 90s to 100 or so. To be 104 in a couple of days.

Take care . . xx


diogenes profile image

diogenes 3 years ago from UK and Mexico

...."Shmeat?"..."Shmit!"

And a good day to ye. Lovely weather here...for weeks!

B xoxo


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for commenting on this article, Aunt Jimi. Everything you say is very possible. I guess if one doesn't want to eat certain things, the best way is to either grow their own or stop eating whatever it is that they worry may be put in their food without their knowledge. It can happen with fruits or vegetables or processed/restaurant food of all kinds, not just meat.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Dr. Stiffy for leaving a short comment. I apologize for taking so long to respond, but for some inexplicable reason it was put in the Spam comments folder and I didn't even know you had left it. Appreciate that you stopped in.


Aunt Jimi profile image

Aunt Jimi 3 years ago from The reddest of the Red states!

I'm thinking that just like the cloned meat and the genetically engineered meat that they sell in the grocery store but don't label for what it is, and they put it in fast food and processed foods so no one even knows they're dating it, that they will do the same thing with this in vetro meat. It will be in processed foods and fast food so that no one can recognize it by the way it looks. I wonder how much longer it will be before that starts happening and if maybe it already is, because they were putting the other meat I mentioned, the cloned and genetically engineered meat into things before people knew about it and by the time they did they had already eaten a bunch of it.

We're all just human guinea pigs aren't we? Fewer and fewer decisions are being left up to us and it's big business that is taking those decisions away from us. Guess who promotes big business.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for sharing your thoughts Aunt Jimi. Agree there could be unforeseen problems with raising meat this way.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for stopping by DDE. Glad to hear you have a healthier diet that most people. I don't go out of my way to eat meat either and I feel better as a result.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you DeborahNeyens for reading and commenting on this article. I would think this would be a more healthful way to raise meat, but some of the things I've read make me wonder. I don't go out of my way to eat meat either. I think it's more efficient and economical, not to mention more healthful not to eat meat.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Brett.Tesol for reading and sharing your thoughts on this article. Also for voting on and sharing/Tweeting it.

Agree completely with what you say. Spam (the food) actually has more substance/texture than the first efforts this shmeat is likely to have, but once they get the hang of it there's no reason they shouldn't be able to replicate it like the real thing. You can sort of see what it looks like in the petri dish in the photo, and the appearance looks to me like bologna lunch meat.


Aunt Jimi profile image

Aunt Jimi 3 years ago from The reddest of the Red states!

While I can see advantages to this stuff I can also see problems and not just in the way the meat would be grown but in how easy it would be to control the food supply. That's a little bit of a two-sided sword. People would probably be wise to grow their own food as much as they can so they can control what goes into it.


DDE profile image

DDE 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

I don't eat much of meat and had learned so much here about In Vetro Meat – Test Tube Meat – Shmeat -- Are You Ready For It, voted up and interesting.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 3 years ago from Iowa

Interesting and well-researched. Since I don't eat a whole lot of meat to begin with and then mostly stick with pastured or organic meat from local farmers, I don't think this would ever make it on to my dinner table!


Brett.Tesol profile image

Brett.Tesol 3 years ago from Somewhere in Asia

In some ways, this could be a great step. Although you mention it is likely to be like spam, once the process develops, I see no reason why they can't replicate exact muscles and all their texture and taste.

However, it will be interesting to see if it is promoted as a cruelty free meat, or slyly introduced without meat lovers realizing ... as it occurred with genetically modified and now cloned meat.

Shared, pinned, tweeted, up and interesting.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Jeff Berndt, for your continued interest in this issue. I think there will be a market for the kind of meat we're used to for a long time to come, and yes, once Shmeat becomes more common the cost of 'real' meat will go up appreciably. There will possibly become more opportunities for people to raise just a few beef cows or a couple of hogs because the price charged by agribusinesses will be so high.

As I pointed out, I grew up on a small farm and we often raised just a hundred chickens or a couple of hogs. There were the big farmers with 1 or 2 hundred head of milk cows, and that's a lot if you consider all the work, and there were some who raised only 1 or 2. We never had more than a dozen head of cattle, if that, at any given time. When we got down to just 1 or 2 it was mainly for our own use.

Beef cattle are much easier to raise. They need a lot of range (pasture), but require very little care like milk cows do.

Once this stuff hits the market you can be reasonably certain it will be in ground meat and other hard to identify meats used in convenience and fast foods.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

KawikaChann, thank you for reading, voting on, and sharing this hub, and for sharing your thoughts on this issue. Agree with you.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you rajan jolly for reading and commenting on this hub, and for voting on it and sharing it also! It is bleeding edge at this time, but with cloned and genetically engineered meat on the market for several years already, this won't be far off.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Vespawoolf, thank you for reading, voting on, and sharing this hub, and for sharing your thoughts on this issue! Cloned and genetically engineered meat has been on the U.S. market for years and it isn't labeled, so a lot of people, probably everyone who eats meat, has eaten these products unawares. Is labeling these different products required in Peru? If it is there may be a lot of people moving to Peru soon . . . ;)


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Moonlake, thank you for voting on and sharing this hub! Hope you found it informative.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Dr. Stiffy, thank you for spotlighting this hub.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for sharing you concern about this issue, Glenda.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Shyron, for reading, voting, pinning, etc., and for sharing your thoughts on this subject, and on how more and more things are being 'printed' out instead of raised, grown, or manufactured. Interesting times we're living in . . .


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Deborah-Diane for reading and sharing your thoughts on this issue. As I pointed out in this article, cloned and genetically engineered meat has been in our supermarkets unlabeled for several years already. Very probably everyone who eats meat has eaten these differently raised meats completely unaware. I'm not sure shmeat is any worse. I do think vegetarianism is the more healthful way to go, however, and the most economical.


Jeff Berndt profile image

Jeff Berndt 3 years ago from Southeast Michigan

"unless it can be grown to look like real meat such as we're used to, it will be discernible by its appearance."

That's reassuring. I had another thought about this, though: what about control? Not people's right to control whether or not they eat GMO food (though that's also important) but the control of our food supply chain. Consider: if you have enough space, you can raise livestock for meat. It doesn't have to be a cow or a hog: you can raise a couple goats, say, on a half-acre plot--if you're willing to do the work. It doesn't require an advanced degree or specialized, expensive equipment. Sure, someone who knows about animal husbandry will do it a lot better, but an interested amateur can still do it.

But shmeat can't be raised in your backyard: it has to be grown in a bio-lab, and you need to be a biochemist to do it at all--no amateurs need apply.

Once shmeat becomes 'cheap' at the point of purchase (which won't necessarily reflect the true cost of its production), a lot of people will choose it over real meat, and it will start getting into our fast food, and in a while, there will be fewer and fewer places where real meat from real animals is even available, and only the very wealthy will be able to afford real beef, ham, chicken, mutton, etc. This worries me.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Jeff Berndt, for reading and sharing your thoughts on this issue, and for your high praise -- it means a great deal coming from you.

Shmeat is very expensive to grow right now, but they're hoping to bring those costs way down below what it costs to raise beef cattle the way they're doing now. Whether it will be a more healthful choice is another issue. Personally, I doubt it. I think the hormones and chemicals necessary for growing the shmeat will be no better than the meat you described that is full of stress hormones, at least in the beginning.

The cloned and genetically engineered meat already on the market for years is not labeled so that people can choose because 'they' know most people wouldn't buy it if it was. I think you can take it to the bank that shmeat won't be labeled either, but it does have a telltale look about it right now. So unless it can be grown to look like real meat such as we're used to, it will be discernible by its appearance.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Peggy W, for reading, sharing your thoughts, voting on and for sharing and pinning this hub! Cloned and genetically engineered meat has been on the market for quite a while in addition to the genetically engineered fruits and vegetables. I don't think some people are aware of that. Agree it should be labeled, but it's not required and you know a lot of people would reject the cloned/engineered stuff if they could, so to prevent the people who've invested in it so heavily from going broke, they don't tell us what we have a right to know. Seems like money is always at the bottom of everything.

I loved the Star Trek Enterprise. Data and Warf were my favorite characters. Yes 3D printers are even putting out guns now. We're almost to those times that seemed so far beyond us when we watched that show.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Diogenes, for reading and commenting on this hub and for your kind praise. Do hope you are taking my advice! Take care, Bobby. xx


KawikaChann profile image

KawikaChann 3 years ago from Northwest, Hawaii, Anykine place

Awesome job! I like the savings and the conditions at which shmeat is manufactured and procured at, but I am afraid of what will happen once the bean counters are involved and they suddenly want to turn a profit. The USDA already has a well-oiled-swinging-door open to anyone with heavily lined pockets, and you can bet that there's someone already greasing the doorway for in-vetro meats. OMG, what a society we've allowed ourselves to become.

Thanks for the solid info, and sources. Bravo. Upvoted/awesome/follow. Peace. Kawi.


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

Very interesting read. Frankly, I'd no idea in vitro meat was being developed. This is an interesting development and how consumers take to it, how it will eventually work out and to whose advantage, only time will tell.

Voted up, interesting and shared.


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 3 years ago from Peru, South America

Scientists and manufacturers will do whatever they want in regards to cloning, test tubing, etc. as long as there is more profit involved. Although I eat meat in small quantities, I avoid anything genetically altered and I wouldn't eat in vetro meat. The fact that the texture is like Spam is enough to turn me off, let alone the process. Thank you for sharing. This was interesting and well researched. Voted up and shared!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America

Interesting hub. Voted up. You are so full of good information I will share this.


Dr Stiffy profile image

Dr Stiffy 3 years ago

Good article on tube steak.


Glenda 3 years ago

Looks like I am going to get real skinny, real fast. I don't think I am ready for the future, and I don't want to go to the past. I guess I can just live in the here and now.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

Au fait, you did it again, wrote an awesome article.

I am an omnivore, I like vegis, fruit and a well done STEAK. I have tasted some crackers that tasted like cardboard. Do you think they were trying to perfect the replicators and some of the replications are out there already?

I watch Investigation ID a lot and on one of the shows a killer replicated a gun to kill, because he could recycle it and the murder weapon would never be found. Not being funny, there really was a show like that.

Will share and voting up, awesome, and interesting and will pin it.


Deborah-Diane profile image

Deborah-Diane 3 years ago from Orange County, California

Thank you so much for this interesting Hub. I had know idea that shmeat even existed! I think I may start getting more of my protein from vegetable and dairy sources! Hummus and yogurt are sounding better and better!


Jeff Berndt profile image

Jeff Berndt 3 years ago from Southeast Michigan

Great article, with excellent use of references and refreshingly free of bombast and hysteria. Well done indeed!

As for whether shmeat is a good idea, I wonder. We already know that meat from animals raised on factory 'farms' is higher in cortisone and other stress-related hormones, and they're fed a diet that they'd never eat if left to themselves. That makes pastured meat much more attractive, even if it is more expensive.

Shmeat seems like a more humane alternative, but doesn't it also seem like it's an overly complicated solution to a relatively simple problem? I mean, if you want meat that isn't drenched in cortisone and full of cholesterol, get meat from pastured animals. It's more expensive at the point of purchase than industrial meat, but it's much cheaper in real cost. It seems like shmeat would be much more expensive at the point of purchase, but what will its true cost be?

If shmeat is clearly and prominently labeled, I welcome it. Those who both want and can afford it should be able to buy it, but those who don't want anything to do with it should be able to easily avoid it if they want.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

I always loved the Star Trec series but always thought that the replicator was pure science fiction. Amazing to think that it just might become reality! You have outdone yourself with this hub. I know that we have been eating genetically altered fruits and veggies for some time now. Things like strawberries as an example keep for much longer times than in the past. I truly think that all of the food products we eat should be labeled so that we can make informed decisions about what we are purchasing and consuming. UUI votes, sharing, tweeting and pinning. This hub of yours should get a gazillion views!


diogenes profile image

diogenes 3 years ago from UK and Mexico

I don't often eat meat, either 'cept chook and fish. But it's fine. It's all molecules, atoms and particles anyway, whether evolution assembles them into a cow or lab rats do into a vetro burger. Bring em on!

Good and cutting edge hub sweetie

Bob x

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