Tapuy - Filipino Rice Wine: How to Make

Tapuy - The Ceremonial Rice Wine of the Cordilleras. Sometimes called 'Filipino sake'. Also a perfect beverage for Bico or Sinukmani, a sticky rice cake for snack in the Philippines. (Photo courtesy by ~MVI~ from Flickr.com)
Tapuy - The Ceremonial Rice Wine of the Cordilleras. Sometimes called 'Filipino sake'. Also a perfect beverage for Bico or Sinukmani, a sticky rice cake for snack in the Philippines. (Photo courtesy by ~MVI~ from Flickr.com)

Tapuy - A Filipino Ceremonial Wine

The tapuy rice wine is considered as the ceremonial wine served during special occasions (such as weddings) and large celebrations like a bountiful harvest festival. Since the natives can produce tapuy rice wine inside their homes, the local wine is also imbibed by the locals on a daily basis.

Tapuy is a Filipino rice wine originated in Batad (a place in the Banaue Rice Terraces), Ifugao, Philippines. This native wine from fermented rice is also produced in the Cordillera Province; particularly in Apayao, Benguet, Kalinga, and Mountain Province. Other names for tapuy in these parts are: tapey or bayah .

The native brew is prepared locally and produced from fermented rice. There are 2 main ingredients: glutinous rice and bubod (starter culture).

Cheers! Tapuy Rice Wine in Batad (Photo courtesy by marklestervalle from Flickr.com)
Cheers! Tapuy Rice Wine in Batad (Photo courtesy by marklestervalle from Flickr.com)
PhilRice's Tapuy Rice Wine (Image Credit: www.philrice.gov.ph)
PhilRice's Tapuy Rice Wine (Image Credit: www.philrice.gov.ph)

Tapuy Rice Wine is Pure

Traditionally, the tapuy rice wine does not have long life. It will become sour after 2 to 3 days (or 3 to 5 days, depending on the method of preparation); thus, it is not a popular wine product in the commercial market. Until the Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) conducted an extensive research about the tapuy, one of the rice wines traditionally produced by Filipinos.

It took six years of performing arduous procedures on production and evaluation of the tapuy rice wine to get a satisfying result of clear-colored and long-lasting wine product labeled as ‘PhilRice Tapuy’.

The commercially-produced PhilRice Tapuy rice wine is transparent in color and full-bodied. It has a strong alcoholic flavor yet moderately sweet and often leaves a lingering taste. To be accurate, the alcohol content of PhilRice Tapuy is 28 proof or about 14 percent. Its storage life has increased to six months or even a year.

Even though PhilRice Tapuy has no preservatives added, the freshness of the rice wine is assured through double pasteurization. It has no sulfites (which are preservatives found in other wines) that sometimes cause adverse reactions like hang-over and allergy.

The tapuy rice wine by PhilRice has no water added during the long process of production. After fermentation, the harvested rice wine is pasteurized, aged, filtered, and clarified before bottling. The bottled rice wine is pasteurized once again (at 60 to 65 degrees C) before sealing.

During the production of PhilRice Tapuy, no water was added. Compared to the sake rice wine, which has 80 percent water content, tapuy is pure.

Tapuy Rice Wine Sold to Tourists and Passers-By in a Roadside Store (Photo courtesy by Clarissa-Ren from Flickr.com)
Tapuy Rice Wine Sold to Tourists and Passers-By in a Roadside Store (Photo courtesy by Clarissa-Ren from Flickr.com)

Glutinous Rice Best for Producing Tapuy

The best rice variety for producing tapuy is the waxy or glutinous rice. The round and short grains of glutinous rice is ideal for rice wine making.

The next important ingredient is the starter culture, locally known as ‘bubod’. It is produced in Quezon, Ifugao, and Benguet. ‘Bubod’ is made from rice flour, ginger extract, and old ‘bubod’, which is also referred to as starter culture. It contains microorganisms that convert the starch to sugar; and then the sugar to alcohol. These chemical processes are called saccharification and fermentation, respectively.

In the traditional method of rice wine production often used by the natives, the glutinous rice is cooked and set aside for about 3 days while inside a closed vessel to get through an aerobic fermentation. After 2 to 3 days, the cooked rice will be transferred to a jar made of clay and usually left behind to ferment for about a week. Studies show that 2-week fermentation period for rice is best. The PhilRice Tapuy is fermented for about 2 months.

Banaue Rice Terraces - Home of Tapuy Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)
Banaue Rice Terraces - Home of Tapuy Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)
Batad Rice Terraces in Banaue (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)
Batad Rice Terraces in Banaue (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)

IPITIK FESTIVAL - Ritual of Rice Wine Offering

Ipitik Festival - A Celebration for Tapuy Rice Wine

The Ipitik Festival is a simple and yet solemn ritual that involves the spilling to the ground of the first few drops of the tapuy rice wine right after its jar had been opened. This serves as an offering of gratitude to the Kabunian (the highest deity of the natives in the Cordilleras). Traditionally, the act of wine spilling or wine sipping in behalf of the spirits was performed by the ‘mambunong’ (or ‘shaman’).

As an annual event, rice wine brewers from all over the Cordillera region gather together to bring their best rice wine concoctions. The one whole day of merrymaking was filled with wood-carving contests, art exhibits, and ‘pinikpikan’ (a large cook-out that aims to feed hundreds of people). There are gong players, mostly children who dance while playing a lively beat. Indeed, the tapuy rice wine is deeply rooted in one of the colorful and diverse cultures in the Philippines.

Cooked White Glutinous Rice (Photo courtesy by FotoosVanRobin from Flickr.com)
Cooked White Glutinous Rice (Photo courtesy by FotoosVanRobin from Flickr.com)
Black Glutinous Rice (Photo courtesy by FotoosVanRobin from Flickr.com)
Black Glutinous Rice (Photo courtesy by FotoosVanRobin from Flickr.com)

Red Wine from Rice

Red rice wine is made from colored or pigmented rice; such as the black and the red rice variety. The red color of the rice is caused by anthocyanins, which are known good antioxidants. The anthocyanins found in red rice wine are similar to red wines made from grapes and blueberries. Antioxidants help protect the body cells from toxins that cause cancer and other cardiovascular diseases.

PhilRice had tested four colored rice varieties cultivated in the Cordillera and Palawan provinces as ingredients for the red rice wine production in the Philippines.

Main Ingredients for Tapuy Rice Wine

The main ingredients for tapuy rice wine are the glutinous rice (colored or white) and starter culture (locally called ‘bubod’). About 10 grams of bubod is needed for 1 kilogram of rice.

Ingredients for Tapuy Rice Wine - Cooked Glutinous Rice, Bubod or Starter Culture, Brown Rice, Black Rice, and White Rice(Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Ingredients for Tapuy Rice Wine - Cooked Glutinous Rice, Bubod or Starter Culture, Brown Rice, Black Rice, and White Rice(Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)

TRADITIONAL TAPUY RICE WINE MAKING

The main ingredient for tapuy is glutinous rice, or what Filipinos call, 'malagkit'.

Step 1 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

The traditional process of tapuy rice wine making usually starts with separating the chaffs from the rice grains.

Traditional Way of Separating the Chaff from Rice Grain (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)
Traditional Way of Separating the Chaff from Rice Grain (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)

Step 2 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

The milling of rice is normally done through pounding the rice using large mortar and pestle.

Pounding with Use of Wooden Pestle and Stone Mortar to Separate Rice Grain from Hull (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Pounding with Use of Wooden Pestle and Stone Mortar to Separate Rice Grain from Hull (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Close-Up of Pounding the Rice Grain as Initial Preparation to Rice Wine Making (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Close-Up of Pounding the Rice Grain as Initial Preparation to Rice Wine Making (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)

Step 3 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

The broken rice hull is separated from rice grains through winnowing. Placed in a shallow bamboo tray, rice is repeatedly thrown upwards to sift and blow away the light-weight hull. This is done carefully and by someone with a steady grip. The wind should be blowing away to protect the eyes.

Winnowing the Rice Hull from Grain (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Winnowing the Rice Hull from Grain (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Hull Dust and Particles from Pounding the Rice must be Removed During Winnowing (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Hull Dust and Particles from Pounding the Rice must be Removed During Winnowing (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)

Step 4 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

The rice is roasted to take out the aroma and get the desired color for the wine.

A Native Ifugao Roasting Rice to Make Tapuy Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)
A Native Ifugao Roasting Rice to Make Tapuy Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Flickr.com)
Roasting the rice in a large wok and stir continuously with a wooden paddle to avoid burning (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Roasting the rice in a large wok and stir continuously with a wooden paddle to avoid burning (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Roasting the rice grains for 30 minutes or until the grains turned to golden brown (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Roasting the rice grains for 30 minutes or until the grains turned to golden brown (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)

Step 5 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

The roasted rice is washed and steeped overnight. It is washed again and drained well before adding water for cooking or steaming. For every 1 cup of rice, 1 and 1/2 cup of water is added. Boil over medium-high heat; then simmer over low heat to cook without burning.

According to a study about tapuy, the red and waxy rice variety is preferred. To optimize the growth of microorganisms in the bubod, rice and water ratio should be 1:3 (1 cup rice to 3 cups of water). The cooking or steaming process should be extended from 45 to 60 minutes.

Rice is boiled inside a covered pot with enough amount of water until cooked. (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Rice is boiled inside a covered pot with enough amount of water until cooked. (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)

Step 6 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

The cooked rice needs cooling down. Spread the rice on a dry and clean shallow tray or dish.

Cooked rice is transferred to a dry and shallow tray (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Cooked rice is transferred to a dry and shallow tray (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)

Step 7 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

While cooling the cooked rice, crush the bubod or starter culture with a fork. The bubod can also be pulverized using mortar and pestle until it reaches powder form. Sift the crushed bubod through a strainer.

Crush the bubod (starter culture) (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Crush the bubod (starter culture) (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Powdering the bubod using mortar and pestle while cooling the cooked rice (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Powdering the bubod using mortar and pestle while cooling the cooked rice (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)

Step 8 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

Sprinkle the powdered bubod all over the surface of cooked rice.

Sprinkle powdered bubod on surface of cooked rice (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Sprinkle powdered bubod on surface of cooked rice (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Apply the powdered bubod on cooked rice (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Apply the powdered bubod on cooked rice (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)

Step 9 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

Mix the cooked rice and bubod powder thoroughly.

Mix the cooked rice to distribute the bubod (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Mix the cooked rice to distribute the bubod (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Sprinkle bubod over cooked rice again (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Sprinkle bubod over cooked rice again (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Mix cooked rice again (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Mix cooked rice again (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Mixture of bubod and rice (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Mixture of bubod and rice (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)

Step 10 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

Pour rice and bubod mixture into a plastic bag inside a container with cover. Or, wrap the mixture in the wilted banana leaf and place inside a pot with lid. The idea is to keep the air humid during fermentation.

Transfer the rice and bubod mixture inside a plastic bag (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Transfer the rice and bubod mixture inside a plastic bag (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Place the rice and bubod mixture in a bag to ferment (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)
Place the rice and bubod mixture in a bag to ferment (Image Credit: AkosiSuperEdwinK from pinoyphotography.org)

Step 11 - How to Make Tapuy Rice Wine

Cover or seal the rice and bubod mixture and set aside in a cool, dry, and dark place to ferment for 2 to 3 days. The freshly brewed wine from rice can be served right after harvest. This is the stage when tapuy rice wine tastes sweet (or moderately sweet) but with biting alcohol flavor.


Sprinkle remaining bubod powder over mixture before sealing the banana leaf wrap (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Sprinkle remaining bubod powder over mixture before sealing the banana leaf wrap (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Mix again to ensure even distribution of bubod (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Mix again to ensure even distribution of bubod (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Cover the container and place it in a safe place to ferment for a few days (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)
Cover the container and place it in a safe place to ferment for a few days (Image Credit: Photos by Jun Verzola and Brenda Dacpano/NORDIS from galleries.nordis.net)

The Making of PhilRice Tapuy Rice Wine

(Image Credit: PhilRice)
(Image Credit: PhilRice)

For special occasions like a dinner party, serving rice wine stored for at least 1 month is recommended.

When stored longer, the taste of tapuy rice wine would be full-bodied and got a certain strength and flavor that lingers in the mouth.

If a higher alcohol content is desired, lengthen the storage time from 6 months to up to 1 year. The aged tapuy rice wine could taste - and kick - like brandy.

Serve tapuy rice wine warm or cold. Pour it in a simple cup or a fancy goblet. Tapuy is also used to mix cocktail drinks.

As an exotic culinary ingredient, tapuy gives authentic taste to foods when added while cooking or marinating.

Other Filipino rice wines: 'pangasi' and 'kulapo', are found in Mindanao, Philippines. These are also made from rice but have distinctive flavors. Kulapo is red rice wine with strong alcohol smell and taste.

(Image Credit: PhilRice)
(Image Credit: PhilRice)

How to Make Bubod (Starter Culture) for Rice Wine Making

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup Rice flour (any rice variety)
  • ½ cup Old bubod (referred to as ‘mother starter culture')
  • 1 Tbsp Ginger juice (fresh extract from grated ginger root)
  • ¼ cup Water, distilled and sterilized


Procedure:

  1. Clean ginger root, about the size of a thumb. Remove skin and grate. Add water, then squeeze grated ginger to extract juice. Strain.
  2. Pulverize mother bubod until it turn to fine powder. Put in a shallow dish.
  3. Combine rice flour and ginger-water mixture. Blend well to form a firm dough, cut into small lumps, and shape into thin patties.
  4. Coat each side of the patties with the mother bubod powder. Place on a tray made of fine screen. Set aside in a dry and dark place to incubate from 28 to 48 hours.
  5. Dry in very low temperature inside the oven. Let cool.
  6. Arrange bubod patties inside a clean and dry jar with air-tight lid. Store in dry and cool place.

How To Make Natural Yeast

How to Make Homemade Sweet Rice Wine

DIFFERENT TYPES OF RICE WINE

Rice wine is a beverage made from rice with alcohol content of 18 to 25%, higher than wine and beer. Ordinary wine has 10 to 20% and beer has 3 to 8%.

Wine is produced from fermented grapes and other fruits. Rice wine is the result of fermentation that converts starch to sugars. Beer fermention involves a mashing process that converts starch to sugars.

There are different methods of rice wine making found in most Asian countries but the rice grains will always be the main ingredient.

Country of Origin
Name of Rice Wine
Japan
Amazake
China
Ang Jiu
Indonesia
Brem
Vietnam
Basi-De
Korea
Cheongju
Vietnam
Cơm rượu
China
Choujiu
Korea
Gamju
China
Huangjiu
China
Jiuniang
Philippines
Kulapo
Laos
Lao-Lao
Sabah, Malaysian Borneo
Lihing
Korea
Makgeolli
China
Mijiu
Thailand
Ou
Philippines
Pangasi
Tibet, Nepal
Raksi
Vietnam
Rượu đế
Vietnam
Rượu cần
Vietnam
Rượu nếp
Japan
Sake
Thailand
Sato
Japan
Shōchū
India
Sonti
Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo
Tuak
Philippines
Tapuy
Sabah, Malaysian Borneo
Tapai

How to Make Lihing - Rice Wine from Kadazandusun in Sabah

Carbonated Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by keizie from Flickr.com)
Carbonated Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by keizie from Flickr.com)
Rice Wine in Can (Photo courtesy by preetamrai from Flickr.com)
Rice Wine in Can (Photo courtesy by preetamrai from Flickr.com)
Nigori Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Gilgongo from Flickr.com)
Nigori Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Gilgongo from Flickr.com)
Barrels of Sake Rice Wine in Nara Shrine (Photo courtesy by ricourian from Flickr.com)
Barrels of Sake Rice Wine in Nara Shrine (Photo courtesy by ricourian from Flickr.com)

What is Sake?

History of Sake : Sake Made in the USA

Liquor Vending Machine Selling Japanese Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Steph & Adam from Flickr.com)
Liquor Vending Machine Selling Japanese Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Steph & Adam from Flickr.com)

A Visit to a Sake Brewery

Japanese Rice Wine

Ginjo Sake: How to Make Cocktails With Sake

How To Heat and Serve Sake

Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by ringo134 from Flickr.com)
Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by ringo134 from Flickr.com)
Top Left Corner - Large Bowl of Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by strikeael from Flickr.com)
Top Left Corner - Large Bowl of Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by strikeael from Flickr.com)
Fermented Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Sung Sook from Flickr.com)
Fermented Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by Sung Sook from Flickr.com)
Korean Rice Wine in Bottle (Photo courtesy by jetalone from Flickr.com)
Korean Rice Wine in Bottle (Photo courtesy by jetalone from Flickr.com)
Korean Rice Wine Served in Wine Bowls (Photo courtesy by strikeael from Flickr.com)
Korean Rice Wine Served in Wine Bowls (Photo courtesy by strikeael from Flickr.com)
Makgeolli - Korean Rice Wine and Kimchi (Photo courtesy by Fritz Park from Flickr.com)
Makgeolli - Korean Rice Wine and Kimchi (Photo courtesy by Fritz Park from Flickr.com)

Makgeolli ("Rice Wine") Making

Amis Rice Wine Making

Rice Wine Trivia

In the late 1940, the making of homemade rice wine was made illegal in Taiwan. Thankfully, Chenyu Meiyina (an Amis from Fengbin Township, Hualien) has preserved the knowledge and culture of wine brewing. She uses natural plants as yeast with glutinous rice to make wine.

Chinese Rice Wine in Wine Glass (Photo courtesy by John Loo from Flickr.com)
Chinese Rice Wine in Wine Glass (Photo courtesy by John Loo from Flickr.com)
Shaoxing Hua Diao Wine (Photo courtesy by Bernt Rostad from Flickr.com)
Shaoxing Hua Diao Wine (Photo courtesy by Bernt Rostad from Flickr.com)
Shaoxing Hua Diao Wine in Box (Photo courtesy by Bernt Rostad from Flickr.com)
Shaoxing Hua Diao Wine in Box (Photo courtesy by Bernt Rostad from Flickr.com)

Chinese Rice Wine

12-Year Old Rice Wine in Shanghai (Photo courtesy by perke from Flickr.com)
12-Year Old Rice Wine in Shanghai (Photo courtesy by perke from Flickr.com)
'1939' Rice Wine in Shanghai - 8 Years Old (Photo courtesy by perke from Flickr.com)
'1939' Rice Wine in Shanghai - 8 Years Old (Photo courtesy by perke from Flickr.com)
Chinese Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by RussBowling from Flickr.com)
Chinese Rice Wine (Photo courtesy by RussBowling from Flickr.com)
Rice Wine in China (Photo courtesy by vipeldo from Flickr.com)
Rice Wine in China (Photo courtesy by vipeldo from Flickr.com)

Exotic Rice Wine as Traditional Medicine

Snake wine is rice wine (or any grain alcohol) with whole snakes and other medicinal herbs saturated in it. During preservation, the snake venom is denatured by the ethanol alcohol of rice wine. Snakes are preferably venomous like cobras. But since most species of snake are endangered, export of snake wine is prohibited.

Scorpions, as well as ginsengs, are also steeped in rice wine.

This wine is considered as traditional medicine in China, Vietnam, and all over Southeast Asia. It is believed to cure many illnesses like hair loss and farsightedness. It is also considered as an aphrodisiac.

The Huaxi street night market found in Taipei, Taiwan is popular for sellers of snake foods and snake wine products.

Snake wine is called rượu rắn in Vietnamese.

The Art of Making Snake Wine

Rice Wine with Snakes and Scorpions in Vietnam (Photo courtesy by benklocek from Flickr.com)
Rice Wine with Snakes and Scorpions in Vietnam (Photo courtesy by benklocek from Flickr.com)
Exotic Rice Wines in Vietnam (Photo courtesy by A_of_DooM from Flickr.com)
Exotic Rice Wines in Vietnam (Photo courtesy by A_of_DooM from Flickr.com)

More by this Author


Comments 22 comments

Loren's Gem profile image

Loren's Gem 6 years ago from Istanbul, Turkey

Awesome! I've nothing else to say but I'm truly impressed with this Tapuy Rice Wine hub. I was just curious to know Tapuy being a "rice wine" as I've seen a photo of the bottle of wine that looks gorgeous in one of your previous Hubbalicious hubs. And I've never tried rice wine (nor seen it) in anyway which lead me to ask this from you. Thanks for answering my question Czarina - and you answered more than I've expected - very comprehensively written and as usual, I love your visuals accompanying your hubs.

I'm raising my two thumbs up - for you and for your hub and I'm voting this up! :-)


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 6 years ago Author

Thank you for the warm appreciation, Loren's Gem. I was kind of embarrassed because completing the answer hub was taking me so long - but I just couldn't resist the photos and the multitude of information that I gathered when I researched about Tapuy and rice wine. Thank you for asking a great question because I have also learned a lot :)


Sandyspider profile image

Sandyspider 6 years ago from Wisconsin, USA

An amazing hub. I learned how to make rice wine. The photos really make it.


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 6 years ago Author

Thank you, Sandy :) It's been a pleasure to do this hub.


DavidLivingston 6 years ago

Very interesting post. I liked it. Thank you.


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 6 years ago Author

Hi David! Thank you for liking my hub :D


funky23 5 years ago from Deutschland

well done post thank you for the tips :D


leonardobapex profile image

leonardobapex 5 years ago from Bangkok, Thailand

A well-detailed hub about making a tapuy. I liked it.


Lita C. Malicdem profile image

Lita C. Malicdem 5 years ago from Philippines

This is an excellent rice wine hub! The most basic rice wine I make is called "binuburan". I cook 2 cups rice, cool it until warm. Mix one crushed yeast "bubor". Enfold the mixture in clean young banana leaves. Put it in a bowl wrapped in white cloth. Don't refrigerate. Wait for 4-5 days. When it smells and is soft, boil 2 cups of water with sugar of your desire. When warm, pour over the mixture. This becomes the wine. Eat the fermented rice and enjoy the rice wine, too! Thanks for sharing your expertise in local rice wine making.


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 5 years ago Author

Hi funky23! Thanks for reading. :D

Hello leonardobapex! I'm glad you like this hub. It's been a pleasure writing it. :D


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 5 years ago Author

Hello Lita!

Thank you very much for sharing a simplified version of rice wine recipe and procedure. It seemed similar to the making of 'tagilo', a capampangan side dish. Instead of yeast, cooked rice was mixed with fresh fish and salt then left to ferment for almost 1 week. It really smells when being stir-fried! But it is perfect with fried fish or boiled vegetables like eggplant and bitter melon. :)


glendy 5 years ago

hi. I've learned a lot from your post and wanted to make my own Tupay:)but i am more curious of where to find this BUBOD thing. can you please tell me where to buy bubod?

thanks and regards :)


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 5 years ago Author

Hello glendy,

Bubod is often made. Just follow the steps on how to make it. :) Thanks for reading!


ChristinCordle12 profile image

ChristinCordle12 5 years ago

WOW.Really great information I found here.Your hub makes me more eager to taste tapuy wine.


Adawey 4 years ago

Wow, this is great! Thank you for all the additional information, really interesting and informative with those pictures too :-D

I need to have one of those patties (bubod) soon to make my own rice wine and see how would it be and see if I can invite my colleagues for a taste test .


Serah 3 years ago

I like this tapuy a lot.. never tried it. you say you can make bubod . i saw the recepe for making bubod BUT it says you need ½ cup Old bubod (referred to as ‘mother starter culture') i dont have old bubod :(

i have all the ingredients but not "old bubod" or mother starter culture.

is there a way to learn how to make mother starter, if NOT can i use bread yeast? thank you alot


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 3 years ago Author

I am not sure but let me compare the procedure to my late great grandma's rice cake recipe. She used to refer to 'old mother yeast' as one of major ingredients... but managed to cook fine rice cakes with bread yeast. Maybe, using old yeast just speed up the process. :) My best suggestion, use the freshest ingredients to make sure the food or drink you produce is safe for human consumption. :) Thanks for dropping by!


self-counsel profile image

self-counsel 3 years ago

Hi! You have a well-presented information about making Tapuy. Pictures showed the use of plastic bag, banana leaf, and storage jar during the fermentation process. Are these materials alternative for glass or food grade plastic carboys, which may come expensive?

Thanks so much! I enjoyed reading your article. It is very informative. Up one vote and useful.


Nhing 2 years ago

My fathers makes tapuy the Ilocos version and I really miss it. he used malagkit and lebadura and that's it. But the only thing is I cannot find that kind of lebadura he is using (very tough & round shaped).

I miss tapuy


anie 17 months ago

Thank you so much i learned a lot from your article, i based here my research in school if how to make rice wine...


CjoyOrbizo@gmail.com 3 months ago

ang ganda ng paggawa


queen cleopatra profile image

queen cleopatra 5 weeks ago Author

thank you!

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