Chess Puzzles

Winning chess strategies and chess tactics can be found in many different areas. Working on chess openings and chess endgames are two great ways to improve your chess tactics and playing ability. Chess puzzles are another great way to improve your game should be part of any player’s practice sessions.

You can start with mate in 1 (beginner) and then mate in 2 (intermediate) and continue on to the more difficult advanced chess puzzles. Other types of chess puzzles, such as those where the player is not solving for mate, but instead is trying to find the winning move can also really help improve one's chess game. These types of puzzles are usually about finding the move that wins material or changes the position so dramatically, that it also changes the outcome.

Another way to improve your chess game is to take chess lessons. This helps for many reasons, not the least of which is you get instant feedback on your particular issue or issues, because the chess instruction is tailored directly to you. But remember, nothing beats practice!

The puzzles that follow here are mate in 2. Good luck!

Please scroll down to see the chess puzzles.
Please scroll down to see the chess puzzles.

A game is always won through a mistake, either the opponent's or one's own. Tartakover

Savielly Tartakower (1887–1956) was a leading Polish and French chess Grandmaster. He was also a leading chess journalist of the 1920s and 30s.

Chess 101 -- A beginner chess book for new or novice chess players
Chess 101 -- A beginner chess book for new or novice chess players

Chess 101 was written for those who have just learned or want to learn to play chess. The book has been endorsed by top chess teachers and players alike, and provides all the basic information you need to know to learn and enjoy the game of chess.


Read more about Chess 101 and my other books at Dave Schloss.com


Interested in chess lessons? Email me.

Chess Puzzle #1 (White to Move, Mate in 2)

Chess puzzles (Click to enlarge)
Chess puzzles (Click to enlarge)

Answer to Chess Puzzle #1




The answer is for white to play Q-f5. Black plays NxQ and e6 is checkmate. Queen sacrifices are great when they work.

Chess Puzzle #2 (White to Move, Mate in 2)

Chess puzzles (Click to enlarge)
Chess puzzles (Click to enlarge)

Click here to get great deals on chess sets, boards, clocks and other chess equipment at Wholesale Chess


Answer to Chess Puzzle #2



White plays Q-e8. Black must capture with either the rook the knight and checkmate follows with N-f7.A beautiful smothered mate.

Chess Puzzle #3 (White to Move, Mate in 2)

Chess puzzles (Click to enlarge)
Chess puzzles (Click to enlarge)

Answer to Chess Puzzle #3




White begins by playing Qxc6 check. Black is forced to recapture white's queen with bxc6. Checkmate follows when white plays B-a6.

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