Online Game Multiplayer - Conquer Club

Conquer Club Third Crusade map

Conquer Club Third Crusade map - one of hundreds with access to all players, free.
Conquer Club Third Crusade map - one of hundreds with access to all players, free. | Source

Basic Overview of Conquer Club

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Conquer Club is a multiplayer strategy game similar to the Risk board game, owned by Parker Brothers (Hasbro). Each player can start a game, and invite other players to compete. The process involves competing in each game, and winning points from the other players. Losers, of course, give up points.

Competition, and awarding of points at the end of games, rewards novice players for defeating experienced and champion players. When a lower ranked player defeats a player of higher rank, more points are won. Ranks are more easily acquired initially. As players gain experience and put wins onto their records, the accession of rank becomes more difficult.

Conquer Club Perks not Available with Most Other Gaming

Tournaments

Conquer Club hosts many tournaments. Winners receive points from each game they win. Additionally, a trophy is added to the player’s profile showing the victory.

Permanent Accounts

Conquer Club has free accounts, called “Freemium” and paid accounts called “premium”. Players join from all over the world. Play against the French, Brazilians, Russians, Portuguese and Germans- sometimes all in the same game. Freemium accounts allow strategists from all continents and economies to compete in up to four games simultaneously. A premium account, however, costs just $25 per year and permits an unlimited number of games. Additionally, some tournaments award a number of months of premium account. Because there are free accounts, they never expire. Listed players on the “Scoreboard” are those who have played a game within the last 30 days. In December, 2011, there were nearly 17,000 players actively playing games.

Think you can beat the best strategic minds from all over the world? Join Conquer Club.

Risk Legacy Game
Risk Legacy Game

You have to read the reviews on this game to understand why it is 4.8 stars of 5 on Amazon. Some call it "mind blowing." The board remembers past games and changes to make subsequent games different. Don't fail to read the reviews.

 

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Unlimited Variety of Maps and Variations of Game Play

Endless Variety of Maps

It is difficult to master a map (meaning you can win two-thirds of all games on that map, imho). Each map has different scenarios: Famous battles like Waterloo and Actium are the basis of some maps. The value of territories differs according to the designer and input in forums as new maps are developed. Additionally, any player can initiate and build a new map. Players from all continents have developed maps using their regions and cities. There are dozens of maps based on transit systems as well. Because players can build maps, there is no limit to new maps.

Additionally, each map can change according to how the initiating player sets up the map. The number of players can vary from 2 to 8. In special tournaments, many more can joint just one map! Players can play on teams: double, triples, and quadruples.

Several other factors make playing even the same map endlessly challenging. When you join, you will find out!

The Eurasia Map (I'm blue in this game- doing some serious conquering.)
The Eurasia Map (I'm blue in this game- doing some serious conquering.) | Source

Card Exchange similar to Risk

In the classic Risk game, each player receives a card for each turn in which an enemy territory is successfully captured. In Conquer Club, this is an option for each game. The player who sets up the game selects the options. For card play, called spoils, there are three options: none (no cards, and no trade in for bonus troops deployments); flat rate, and escalating.

In flat rate games, there are 4 possible combinations of three card colors. Each combination gives a different number of troops for a 3-card set.

  1. Three red cards: 4 troops
  2. Three green cards: 6 troops
  3. Three blue cards: 8 troops
  4. Mixed set: 1 red, 1 green, and 1 blue card: 10 troops

In addition, if you trade in a card for which you hold the territory named on that card, you will receive a +2 troop bonus. In this way, the maximum a player may receive on a flat-rate game trade-in is 16 cards. This would be a mixed set (+10) with each territory held by the player turning in the set (+2 x 3 = +6).

In escalating games, the type of set does not matter. A set can be any of those mentioned above: 3 of one color, or a mixed set. However, the value of the set depends entirely on when the set is turned in.

  1. 4 troops
  2. 6 troops
  3. 8 troops
  4. 10 troops
  5. 12 troops
  6. 15 troops
  7. 20 troops
  8. and then +5 troops over the previous set's value: 25, 30, 35...

Reasons to Play Conquer Club

1. Fun. Life should be lived in balance. Taking a break from balancing the bank account is healthy.

2. People who actively use their brain regularly stay mentally sharp much longer than those who do not. Strategizing your play requires some mental muscle sometimes.

3. Learn some foreign culture. Players hail from all corner of the globe. I have learned a lot about other people while playing.

Conquer Club Conquer Cup

Another fun aspect of the online multiplayer Conquer Club community is the Conquer Cup. This game is hosted annually and costs $5 to join. If you don't have $5, there is an option to fill out surveys to earn a seat in the tournament.

2012 is my second year in the Conquer Cup. I failed to advance at all in 2011. This year, I've already lost my first game in double elimination. In the second round, however, my position and troop count is looking good.

Conquer Cup IV

Conquer Cup IV game. I've included the basic information on a game screen: game number, round number, players, and, at the bottom, the cards I have.
Conquer Cup IV game. I've included the basic information on a game screen: game number, round number, players, and, at the bottom, the cards I have. | Source

Only Play with Players You Like

The community of Conquer Club is fantastic. The rules against cheaters are strong, and are also enforced. Some examples of corrupt play include secret diplomacy and multiple accounts. All treaties and agreements must be posted in open game chat, for all players to see.

Multiples, players with two or more accounts can get be penalized. When a player is caught cheating, they are kicked out of the game. Their territories become neutrals with the same troop count as before the player was booted.

However, each and every player can "friend" another player or "foe" other players as well. Just go to the home profile page of that player and click "friend" or click "foe". Confirm the action, and they are foe'd.

Personally, I foe players for the following reasons:

  1. They consistently conquer me on a map I love (rare)
  2. The player misses a lot of turns while others wait 24 hours (uncommon)
  3. Players who take 23 hours and 40 minutes before taking their turn- every time.
  4. Players who attack out of revenge in plays that cannot possibly win them the game. (also uncommon)
  5. Players with vulgar user names (just because I don't like bad form)

Hard to Spot Cheating

After playing Conquer Club for a few years, it is clear that there is a small group of cheats. This is a very small group. One tactic I witnessed was this: two players played several games involving a third player. This third player, who had very low rank because he almost never won a game, simply never attacked the other two players.

Instead, he attacked the leaders. The two other players, who had some rank, won every game in which the third player was involved. These games were typically 4 or more total players. So, the fourth, fifth and other players are oblivious they are being set up.

Mutually Supporting Clan:

I have also played a few games with a clan called "the Headless Horsemen". Though I have had positive interactions with the top ranking players in that clan, I have consistently had bad experiences in multiplayer games with the lower ranking players of HH.

The strategy is simple: Open an 8-player game and leave one open slot for an outsider. Everyone pecks at the outsider, who remains weak in the game, and then goes out early. These players play many games together. If they did not invite outsiders to occasionally play with them, they would only move rank points around amongst their small group.

Allowing outsiders to join and "donate" points ensures the group rank continues to grow.

So, there is a 7th group I always foe: low-ranking members of HH.

Foeing players with undesirable and/or unfriendly game tactics will increase your enjoyment of Conquer Club. These experiences are very limited, and easy to avoid, now that I've warned you. However, 98% of the time, games are fair and fun.

Continued Adaptation to Player Requests

There have been several improvements in the last year. One of these is the addition of an option to play several armies in one game. Each player receives the same number of "polymorphic" armies.

Under the polymorphic option, each player receives 2, 3, or 4 armies. This is a great option. It reduces the chance of entering a large map, with many regions, and losing after just round 1. On a large map, with two players, the player who plays first has an advantage. The large troop deployment he/she receives will do a lot of damage to the second player. It often dictates the winner if both players are evenly matched in skill.

Here is a recent polymorphic game I eventually won. The map is modeled after the Battle of Gazala in WWII.

Battle for Gazala: Polymorphic

A Snagit capture of the screen, mid-game.
A Snagit capture of the screen, mid-game. | Source

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