Parker Vector Fountain, Ball-Point Pen, Rollerball, Pencil Review

Parker Vector

Parker Vector epitomizes the company's casual, function oriented aesthetic in a more futuristic, minimalist vein than Frontier or Jotter.

It stands out for its characteristically geometrically cut, short nib (stainless steel), and straight tubular barrel and section shape, where the latter appears to extend from the former as a telescope would. This type of design is not just simple, it's intentionally simplified, bringing the idea of casual to the level of artistry – echoing Pelikan Ductus, another tubular shaped collection.

Vector arrives in men's and ladies' editions, covered in red, black, or blue resin, available in four writing systems: fountain pen, ball-point pen, roller-ball, and mechanical pencil. Premium line opts for high-gloss finishes and textural chiseled patterns on the caps, reminiscent of Waterman Perspective and Montblanc stainless steel Meisterstuck.

Parker Vector Fountain Pen
Parker Vector Fountain Pen

Design

The clip summarizes Vector aesthetic in an effective, eloquent fashion: instead of the textured, feather-shaped arrow, a highly stylized, contemporary interpretation of the logo attaches to the cap, offering a different – parallel – view of what Parker represent and offer. Even the title of the collection reflects this conception, as the word “vector” means a direction, or a specific course.

The shortened, triangular nib eschews traditionally used flowing contours, presenting a direct template that matches the no-nonsense spirit of the body. Overall, while some critics consider this design “unremarkable,” we suggest that Vector's industrial character distinguished it from the orthodox in a positive way, making it appealing for collectors or customers who wish to make a change.

Trims

A true casual pen, Vector dispenses with traditional trims: no gold, chrome, or even nickel ornaments appear on any part of the instrument – a sharp and principal turn from the classically accepted norm, even by Parker (for instance, as it is evident in Parker Duofold).

Instead, we witness a continuous, uninterrupted flow of metal or resin, accompanied by the clip as the only component that breaks the form. This is the epitome of industrial design – the reason why Parker pens are so easily mass produced, and became so popular across the planet.

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