Pelikan Souveran Fountain Pen, Rollerball, Ball-Point, Mechanical Pencil Review:

Pelikan Souveran

Pelikan Souveran stands out as the brand's largest and most versatile collection in practically all parameters: sizes of the writing instruments (from M300, the smallest, to M1000, the largest), variety of colors (warm yellow and red, and cooler greens and blues), and materials (natural resin, acetate, and precious metals). The long and complex history of this collection is marked by the numerous special and limited editions, many of them sought for vintage items, that today can be found in special stores, or on eBay – hundreds of relevant listing appearing daily.

Design

Souveran design is simple, yet crucially effective – it's not in vain that many aficionados consider Pelikan to be the most practical brand in terms of ease of use, utility, and comfort – a classic monolithic block of resin or cellulose acetate form the casing; a short section from which the 18K gold nib extends; a fluted and striped barrel; a gold trimmed cap. Clip design reveals a cut subtly positioned between Majesty and Ductus, and approaching that of Toledo. The nib will invariably feature the visual representation of the company's logo: a circle enveloping the bird that gave the brand its name.

Pelikan Souveran 800 Pens
Pelikan Souveran 800 Pens

Sizes

The range of sizes in which Souveran fountain pens, rollerball, ball-point, and pencil writing instruments are made available probably has no rival in today's industry. Indeed, this is one of the strongest point of difference Pelikan can offer their customers – the ability to match a pen that will suit their palm size exactly.

Divided first by the hundreds, and then by branching, smaller quantifiers, M300 starts as the smallest of offerings, opposed on the other side of the scale by the giant M1000. A differently sized pen from the one line will look exactly the same – only smaller – as it's larger counterpart.

Writing Systems

The variety of writing modes cements Souveran's status as of a master collection. The collection includes all existing ink based writing systems, as well as two types of pencil: a refill, and a mechanical one.

A change in mode requires a change in design, and so Pelikan render their Souveran ball-point pens and pencils as contemporary instruments where the section is essentially removed by fusion with the barrel (a classic comparison would be to the ball-point Parker Jotter). Roller-ball variants, on the other hand, appear very similar to the fountain pens, only substituting the nib for the appropriate mechanism.

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