Learn How To Play Pool Like A Pro - Lesson On Pool And Billiards Fundamentals and Mechanics

This should have been the first hub.

The world of billiards today is filled with leagues, handicaps, and bad technique. The current system used in billiards games in America does not encourage a lot of growth. If you really want to play well, you will have to take the time to learn the basics. They are relatively simple to understand. The difficulty is in remembering to use them. Fundamentals and mechanics are the true basis for any player's ability, so I have started the series on this topic. Make sure to check out the other hubs in the series and the video at the bottom of the page. Billiards and pool are games of skill that requires precision and finesse. Developing those qualities is very difficult if you do not understand the basics of the stance, the bridge, and the swing. These three are easy to do, however, they are not easy to do well. Learning to approach the table with form, balance, and stability will propel you toward success. We'll start with the stance.




Good form
Good form

The Stance is the position that you put your body into when you take your shot. It is the platform for your balance when playing pool, which will be the first make or break point of any shot. The idea here will be to get you body into a position that will allow you free movement of your swinging arm while allowing your head and chin to get as close to the pool stick as possible. This is done by approaching your practice area and spreading your feet shoulder width apart. Move the foot that matches your bridge arm and point the toes toward the intended target, bending at the knee. Take the foot that corresponds to your swing arm and turn it roughly 40-45 degrees outward, forming an 7 like shape with your feet. Keep your back leg mostly straight, but try not to lock the knee in place. The less places that you hyper extend your body the better you will play. Now that your feet are balanced, bend over from the hips and get your chin as close to the cue as possible. The correct form for playing pool should look very close to the picture in the sidebar.

The Pendulum
The Pendulum
Good view of proper grip
Good view of proper grip

The Swing is what separates the men from the boys and girls from the women. The swing arm is supposed to be the only moving part of the body during a cue sport shot, and it's only supposed to be moving from the elbow down. Good technique is to raise the elbow high and keep it very still to create a pendulum for the hand to swing from. The fingers grip the cue gently, allowing the wrist and hand room to move gracefully back and forth while holding the stick. Once you are in position, you can begin to allow your pendulum to swing. Find the natural path that allows your practice strokes to meet the center of the ball on each return, and limit the motion in the hand. A simple opening and closing of the palm and finger pressure on the cue will create all the room to move that you need. Take each practice stroke carefully, until you have found a path through the ball that you know is correct. Then let your cue stick continue through the ball without changing anything. This is where most people mess up. The practice strokes are to get a feel for the motion you are going to use, and changing that when you go to hit the ball is a good way to mess up. A smooth, solid continuation of the motion that you just spent all that time setting up to be in position for, and nothing more.

Open Bridge
Open Bridge
Closed Bridge
Closed Bridge

The Bridge is the term used to describe the hand that is placed on the table to guide your pool cue. There are many ways to bridge your hand that can support a pool stick, but only a few of them are reliable and effective. The two most common bridges styles are called an open bridge and a closed bridge. The attributes that are required in both are to plant the hand firmly on the table and extend your arm without locking the elbow. First, let's talk about the hand. There needs to be a stable base created so that your guide does not move during the shot. This is done by spreading at least three of your fingers widely on the table with the palm side down, so as to create a reliable foundation. In the open bridge, the fourth finger will be on the cloth as well. Give the wrist some angle to accommodate the fingers by bending your elbow slightly. On the open bridge, you will now bring the thumb up to the base joint on the pointer finger to create a v shape. This will be your guide. For the closed bridge, the cue stick will slide over the middle finger, and pointer finger and thumb will wrap gently around the shaft of the cue. Each have their advantages, mostly relating to the amount of room you have to shoot a shot or how firmly you need to hit the ball. There are images in the side bar to help you get an understanding of the positions that you are trying to attain.

More by this Author


Don't be shy, let me know what you think! 8 comments

avan989 profile image

avan989 4 years ago from maryland

good info. There are a lots of different variation to the open and closed bridge. I thinks it's a matter of preferences once you get good enough.


rclinton5280 profile image

rclinton5280 4 years ago from Greensboro, NC Author

You are right. These are just the basics to help beginners get a feel for the game. Thanks for your interest and your comment


Justin Owens 4 years ago

I'm not a beginner I just would like to step up my game cuz I love playing pool I play 7 days a week I would like to know no some more tips you email me at justinowens84@gmail.com


rclinton5280 profile image

rclinton5280 4 years ago from Greensboro, NC Author

Thanks for reading my article Justin. You can find many more hubs on pool and billiards in my profile. In addition, I encourage you to follow me if you want to read more on the topic. That way you'll be first on line when the next article is published.


rclinton5280 profile image

rclinton5280 3 years ago from Greensboro, NC Author

Thank you for your appreciation of this article. I hope it helps you develop the pool and billiards ability level you desire to achieve. There are more hubs on this subject @ http://hubpages.com/@rclinton5280


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 17 months ago from Northeast Ohio

Great hub Robert on how to learn pool or billiards as a professional. Very informative with detailed steps. Voted up!


rclinton5280 profile image

rclinton5280 17 months ago from Greensboro, NC Author

Thank you, Kristen. I appreciate the support.


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 17 months ago from Northeast Ohio

You've very welcome.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working