Laura Schneider profile image 93

When you "cross" (90 degrees) two high-quality polarizing lenses, what happens?


Now, what happens when you put a third polarizing lens between the first two at a random (but unequal) angle with respect to the first to lenses? And can you explain why?

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calculus-geometry profile image86

Best Answer TR Smith (calculus-geometry) says

4 years ago
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  • Laura Schneider profile image

    Laura Schneider 4 years ago

    Excellent proof! You must be a professor, genius, over-educated unit of the general public, or all of these. :-) Larry's answer got us off to a great start, and yours fleshed out the details. Congrats and thanks! I selected this as the Best Answer!


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Larry Fields profile image90

Larry Fields says

4 years ago
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  • Laura Schneider profile image

    Laura Schneider 4 years ago

    Ding ding ding! You are correct, Sir! I'm pleased that someone else was awake during physics class, too.

    The last part of the question, how and why it works that way, we'll leave to someone else: you've gotten us off the ground.

    Anyone? Guesses?

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