The Most Destructive Sources of Racism

A Raisin in the Sun is a masterpiece that proves the destructiveness of prejudices. This video is presented on youtube.

The powerful play "A Raisin in the Sun" addresses the issue of prejudice that is still prevalent today.

Denzel Washington and Sophie Okonedo, appear in Broadway's new version of the award winning play, "A Raisin in the Sun.
Denzel Washington and Sophie Okonedo, appear in Broadway's new version of the award winning play, "A Raisin in the Sun. | Source
Anika Noni Rose, plays the sister of Walter Younger played by Denzel Washington. She talked about how "A Raisin in the Sun," changed the world.
Anika Noni Rose, plays the sister of Walter Younger played by Denzel Washington. She talked about how "A Raisin in the Sun," changed the world. | Source
One of the comments posted outside the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, concerning the play, "A Raisin in the Sun."
One of the comments posted outside the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, concerning the play, "A Raisin in the Sun." | Source
The play currently on Broadway is "A Raisin in the Sun," which portrays the destructiveness of racism.
The play currently on Broadway is "A Raisin in the Sun," which portrays the destructiveness of racism.
LaTanya Richardson Jackson, wife of the talented actor Samuel Jackson, appears as Mrs. Younger, mother of Walter Younger, played by Denzel Washington. She was nominated for a Tony award based on her performance in this role.
LaTanya Richardson Jackson, wife of the talented actor Samuel Jackson, appears as Mrs. Younger, mother of Walter Younger, played by Denzel Washington. She was nominated for a Tony award based on her performance in this role. | Source

A Raisin in the Sun, is a powerful revised play on Broadway, with the starring role played by Academy Award winner, #Denzel Washington. During an interview with Robin Roberts of Good Morning America, Washington explained the struggles of his character Walter Younger. "He is struggling as a driver in 1959. He is taking his boss to places he got to see but is not a part of it." Washington's character, imagines how the white boys talked about million dollar deals that he desired to be able to do one day". The award winning author Lorraine Hansberry, wrote this masterpiece. "What happens to a dream deferred, does it dry up like a raisin in the sun." Walter Lee Younger, the lead character is devastated to see that his son has to sleep on the sofa in the living room. Washington's character Walter Younger, is thirty five years old and has been married for more than eleven years. He has completely loss his dignity due to the treatment Younger has received as a black man in America. Although this was a drama on Broadway, in New York, the issues of racism and prejudice persist as a devastating practice by people all over the world. No matter where we live in the world prejudice exist, wherever humans are.

In the June 2013 Watchtower magazine this comment and questions were featured, "Despite the prevalence of prejudice, however, most people are quick to condemn it. This truly is a paradox. How could something so disliked be at the same time so widespread? Evidently, many who disapprove of prejudice fail to recognize it in themselves. Could that be true of you? How would you answer that question?" Detecting prejudice within our heart can be difficult. The Bible states: "The heart is more deceitful than anything else." (Jeremiah 17:9, Holman Christian Standard Bible) As imperfect humans, we may try to convince ourselves that we are tolerant of all different types of people. But are we really?

What does the word prejudice mean? Researchers have struggled with the definition over the years. Some express it as, "A negative attitude or feeling toward an individual based solely on that individual's membership in a certain group. Others say that this attitude is based on 'insufficient information which leads to the prejudgment of members of a group. Whatever the case, prejudices can be formed against another person because of his race, weight, gender, language, religion, virtually any perceived difference." The negativity that surrounds prejudices is extremely detrimental to its victim.

#Prejudice and racism, has affected and continues to affect people of all walks of life. Jesus Christ, was the only perfect man who walked the earth and he experienced vicious prejudice. Jesus was looked down upon by the religious leaders due to jealousy, lack of humility and greed. Eventually, these horrible tendencies by the religious leaders caused them to spread lies about Jesus and even plotted to put him to death. "When he was being insulted, he did not threaten, but he entrusted himself to the One who judges righteously." ( 1 Peter 2:23) New World Translation Of The Holy Scriptures What a perfect response to the negative actions of prejudice and racism. Even our current President Barack Obama, expressed during an interview, concerning racism that his grandmother was extremely prejudice. She would say things about people of certain races that would make him cringe. "Many people feel that Obama's tribulations and mistreatment by the Tea Party and some members of Congress, is due to his skin color. It is not just his political party, " stated Eva. Once again, racism and prejudices, can bring out the worst in each of us. Therefore, we should work diligently to completely eliminate these feelings. Below is the poem, A Raisin In the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry which is the origin of this play that was "produced on Broadway shortly before her death in 1964; . . .When A Raisin in the Sun premiered in 1959, it was the first play by an African-American woman to be produced on Broadway."

A Raisin in the Sun

What happens to a dream deferred

Does it dry up

Like a raisin in the sun?

Or fester like a sore -

And then run?

Does it stink like rotten meat?

Or crust and sugar over -

Like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags

Like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

Prejudice and racism, are cowardly sources of manipulation that can cause a person to take away or defer the dreams of another. The victim of racism, can fester or cause resentment because they feel helpless, due to skin color which they cannot change. We are not our hair or the color of our skin but a magnificent creation, called #human beings that caused even the angels to applaud when man was designed by our Grand Creator. We are "wonderfully made," which should cause admiration rather than criticism and judgment based on prejudices.

The concerns of racism is still expressed today even in such demonstrations and acknowledgements as #Remembering "Bloody Sunday" 50 Years Later. Ambassador Andrew Young, reflected on this memorable march in #Selma, Alabama more than fifty years ago. During an interview on #CNN Live he recalled with tremendous endearment how Martin Luther King felt as he expressed, "He had gone through the valley of the shadow of death. He felt his days were numbered." King's fight for the freedom of black people made his death inevitable. Andrew Young went on to explain, "We were doing something so that our children would have a better life. We were all in our early thirties. Most of us thought we would not make it to forty. We had no intention of stopping." These individuals were determined to fight for the rights of others, even to the point of their death. Today, these same type of fights continue within our cultures. Whether it is in #Ferguson or Selma, racism is still prevalent. May each of us look to our Heavenly Father #Jehovah, for the solution to racism which can only to accomplished through God's kingdom, where his son will rule as king.

Part 2, of the award winning series Separate But Equal, has been removed from Youtube and this article due to discrepancies. It is a powerful series, so please try to rent it from your cable company or Netflix. The issues surrounding that film are still be dealt with today concerning racial prejudice. We must all try to remember that our Heavenly Father and Creator is "not partial." Who are we to judge the creation of Our Creator?













The Academy Award winning mini series #Separate But Equal," portrays the true story of desegregation.

Academy award winner Sydney Poitier, plays the role of attorney Thurgood Marshall, in the movie "Separate But Equal."
Academy award winner Sydney Poitier, plays the role of attorney Thurgood Marshall, in the movie "Separate But Equal." | Source
Other major actors such as Cleavon Little also performed
Other major actors such as Cleavon Little also performed | Source
A black child is given a test within the movie "Separate But Equal." Numerous negro boys and girls selected the white doll to be superior or prettier than the black doll.
A black child is given a test within the movie "Separate But Equal." Numerous negro boys and girls selected the white doll to be superior or prettier than the black doll. | Source
The question was even asked by Professor Kenneth Clark, which doll is uglier? Each black child picked the black doll. This proved test was presented during the trial before the Supreme Court to help prove the negative effects of segregation.
The question was even asked by Professor Kenneth Clark, which doll is uglier? Each black child picked the black doll. This proved test was presented during the trial before the Supreme Court to help prove the negative effects of segregation. | Source
Sydney Poitier, appeared as a doctor who was hated because of his race in the chilling move, "No Way Out."
Sydney Poitier, appeared as a doctor who was hated because of his race in the chilling move, "No Way Out." | Source

The award winning mini series "Separate But Equal."

"Their goal was to get equal schools," said Sydney Poitier, who played the role of Thurgood Marshall, in the Academy Award winning mini-television series, Separate But Equal. In 1991, this movie depicted the landmark Supreme Court desegregation case Brown vs Board of Education. This decision had a tremendous effect on the education of millions of black children in the south. I was one of those children.

The second video featured in this article, captivated my attention and tore at my heart, as I researched information on prejudice and racism. Intriguing points are revealed which explain how "Separate but equal was a legal doctrine in United States constitutional law that justified and permitted racial segregation, as not being in breach of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution which guaranteed equal protection under the law to all citizens, and other federal civil rights laws. Under the doctrine, government was allowed to require that services, facilities, public accommodations, housing, medical care, education, employment, and transportation be separated along racial lines, provided that the quality of each group's public facilities was equal. The phrase was derived from a Louisiana law of 1890, although the law actually used the phrase 'equal but separate.'"

A confirmation for state-sponsored segregation was given in the Plessy v. Ferguson of 1896. These segregation laws "emboldened segregation states during the Jim Crow era, which had commenced in 1876 and replaced the Black Codes, which had restricted the civil rights and civil liberties of African Americans with no pretense of equality during the Reconstruction Era." These laws took away every legal and human right for black Americans, especially people in the south. I was born and raised in South Carolina. We had worn books that were passed from local white schools down to us. As a young black girl, In order to receive an education at a segregated black elementary school, we walked more than six miles daily. My single mother had no money to buy a vehicle and buses were not available for black children. This continued until I was in about fifth grade. Regardless, of the weather conditions, we walked to school, in order to receive an education. I was innocent as a child in the south, because I knew nothing about the color of my skin being a problem for some people. I can recall, the designated signs for blacks and whites on water fountains, stores, hospitals and restaurants in the sixties. After the desegregation law was passed, our schools were integrated in 1971. Finally, black and white children were allowed to be educated together. Our school facilities were improved, as well as our books and educational process.

A Solution For the Problems of Racism and Prejudice

Genuine love, is clearly the solution. True Christianity, taught by our Grand Creator, Jehovah God which was clearly demonstrated by his son Jesus Christ, while on earth. Our Heavenly Father, gave us his thoughts, through his word the Bible. In an article entitled, Love Conquers Prejudice, this suggestion is given, " A new form of religious community appeared for the first time in history: not a nation celebrating its patriotic cult, but a voluntary group, in which social, racial and national distinctions were transcended: men and women come together just as individuals, before their god."- A History of Christianity, by Paul Johnson. This description was given about Jehovah's Witnesses as a religious group. We must learn to live together "in true peace and unity." That is the only way love will conquer, prejudice and racism.

Angelladywriter, is not responsible for the advertisements that surround this article. If there are any questions or concerns about the content of this article, please email me claudettecarter83@yahoo.com


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