Allergic Asthma, Symptoms, Treatment, Allergy Triggers And Much More

Miscellaneous plant pollens. Very common allergens

An allergen is a type of antigen that produces an abnormally strong immune response to a perceived treat that would otherwise be harmless to the body. The reaction is an allergy.
An allergen is a type of antigen that produces an abnormally strong immune response to a perceived treat that would otherwise be harmless to the body. The reaction is an allergy. | Source

Cherry Blossom, not always the cause of Spring Allergies

Trees with colourful flowers such as apple and cherry have large sticky pollen grains that don't  disperse very far, and are less likely to cause allergic symptoms. The culprits are more likely to be maple, elm, birch, oak, mulberry and poplar
Trees with colourful flowers such as apple and cherry have large sticky pollen grains that don't disperse very far, and are less likely to cause allergic symptoms. The culprits are more likely to be maple, elm, birch, oak, mulberry and poplar | Source

What is Allergic Asthma

Such a dazzling array of resplendent beauty the Spring and Summer blossoms brings. Unfortunately, the flowers, flowering trees, grasses and shrubs that adorns our gardens and surrounding landscapes, can also herald the time of dreaded misery for millions of people with allergic asthma and hay fever.

The word Asthma, comes from the Greek word for "panting."

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition of the small airways of the lungs. It is the most common chronic disease among children. The disease is characterized by recurrent attacks of narrowing of the airways and obstruction of airflow leading to coughing, wheezing and breathlessness. Symptoms of the condition can vary in severity and frequency from person to person.

Asthma is divided into two general categories, depending on the type of stimuli that triggers the attack.

Intrinsic asthma (non-allergic), generally develop later in life, very little is known about its causes. The prognosis for this type of asthma is worse than for extrinsic asthma, it is more common in women and smokers and tends to be less responsive to treatment.

Extrinsic asthma (allergic) more commonly seen in children and young adults. Most cases of extrinsic asthma are allergy associated, caused by immunoglobulin E (IgE, one of five sub-classes of antibodies). Antibodies are protein produced by the immune system which attacks allergen such as inhaled pollen or chemicals.

In the UK, 5.4 million people are currently receiving treatment for asthma. 1 in 12 or 4.3 million adults and 1 in 11 or 1.1 million children. There are currently two children with asthma in every classroom in the UK. Approximately one death from asthma occurs every seven hours.

Effects Of Air Pollution

Research has shown that pollution from cars, factories and power plants are a major cause of asthma attacks. More than 40% of the US population lives in areas with high levels of pollution. Approximately 30% of childhood asthma is due to environmental exposures that is costing the nation $2 billion per year. Research study from Los Angeles, found that 8% of childhood asthma cases, results from living close to major motorways, a distance of around 250 feet.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates, around 7 million people died in 2012, as a result of exposure to pollution, this equates to 1 in 8 of total global deaths. This estimate confirms that pollution is now the world's largest single environmental health risk.

Asthma cannot be cured but it can be well controlled and managed with proper diagnosis, treatment and education. Allergic asthma is the most common type of asthma. Approximately 90% of children with childhood asthma have allergies, in comparison; only 50% of adults with asthma have allergies.

Allergic asthma is most prominent in the western world but occurs in all countries. WHO predicts that death from asthma will increase in the next ten years if urgent action is not taken. The organisation estimates, that 235 million people are currently suffering from asthma globally.

Asthma is said to be a disease of affluent society. The disease shows widespread difference in prevalence, even in Europe. The reason for this is not yet known, but scientists believe that the difference, almost certainly reflect variations of genetic and environmental factors in different regions.

Study suggests, that rural lifestyle is consistently associated with low prevalence of asthma. The farmer's lifestyle of exposure to farm animals and drinking of unpasteurised milk, is said to be protective in farmers children. The conclusion is that environment rich in microbial organism is beneficial in building infants resistance to asthma (the hygiene hypothesis).

The hygiene hypothesis is a theory proposed in the 1980s. It suggests that a young child's environment can be “too clean” to be effective in stimulating, or challenging the child's immune system to respond to various threats, while the immune system is still maturing.

According to this hypothesis, the lack of challenge to the immune system, results in many people developing immune related health problems like asthma. However; some experts say, there is insufficient evidence to support the idea that reducing modern practice of hygiene would have any impact on conditions such as asthma. But in a 2012 study, conducted by Brigham and Women's Hospital, evidence was found to supports not only the hygiene hypothesis, but also the potential mechanism that can allow this to happen. The theory continues to be controversial.

Asthma is not just a problem for high income countries, the condition can be found in all countries, regardless of the level of development. More than 80% of deaths due to asthma occurs in low and lower- middle income countries. This is mainly due to the fact that the condition is not always properly diagnosed and treated.


Los Angeles Smog, A View looking down from the Hollywood hills into downtown Los Angeles

According to a 2009 report, approximately 60% of Americans live in areas where air pollution has reached unhealthy levels that can cause illness.
According to a 2009 report, approximately 60% of Americans live in areas where air pollution has reached unhealthy levels that can cause illness. | Source

Smog A Health Problem In Hong Kong.

Air pollution in Hong Kong, visibility less than eight kilometers for 30% of the year.
Air pollution in Hong Kong, visibility less than eight kilometers for 30% of the year. | Source
Source

The house dust mite, a common allergens

House dust mite, its feces and chitin (the exoskeleton of insects or fungi) are common  allergens found in homes.
House dust mite, its feces and chitin (the exoskeleton of insects or fungi) are common allergens found in homes. | Source

What is an allergy

One of the functions of the immune system is to protect the body from foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. However; the immune system can become somewhat overzealous and too vigilant. It begins to treat harmless substances as if they were the invading enemy, attacking them in the nose, lungs, eyes and beneath the skin.

An episode of asthma can be triggered by the inhalation of substances known as allergens.

When the body encounter an allergen, the alarm is sounded and special cells known as lgE antibodies are stimulated. These defensive cells trigger the body's allergic reaction, causing the release of chemicals known as histamine, resulting in swelling and inflammation and typical allergy symptoms such as itchy eyes, runny nose and sneezing as the body attempts to fight off and destroy the invading allergens.

Asthma Symptoms and Genetics

During an allergic asthma attack, the airways becomes hypersensitive to allergens to which an individual has become sensitized. When these allergens enters the airways, the body's mass cells or basophils releases substances that causes bronchospasm. The bronchial muscles around the airways goes into a state of sudden tightening and constriction, resulting in narrowing of the airways. The mucus membrane becomes swollen and inflamed, the bronchial glands produces an excess of thick sticky mucus which is difficult to cough up and expel, forming plugs which can further reduce the diameter of the airways causing further obstruction to air flow.

Symptoms of asthma

The symptoms of asthma can be worsened by exercising in cold air and after the inhalation of certain allergens. In almost every asthma suffer, regardless of whether the condition is allergic or non-allergic, the strongest risk factors for developing asthma is a family history of the condition and exposure to indoor allergens.

Asthma triggers includes:

  • House dust and mites in the bedding and carpets and stuffed furniture

  • Air pollution

  • Pet dander, animal fur or feathers, this can be confusing, since research shows that early exposure to cats and dogs can have a protective effect
  • Outdoor allergens like plant pollens and mould spores,

  • Cigarette smoke

  • Chemical irritants, as often used in the work place

  • Airway and chest infections
  • Flu viruses
  • Cold air

  • Extreme emotions like anger, laughter and fear
  • Food allergies, some people may have allergies to bee stings, eating shellfish, nuts, or other foods that can cause an anaphylactic shock reaction triggering a life threatening asthma attack
  • Foods containing sulphites (naturally occurring substance found in some foods, also used as food preservative). Approx. 5% to 11% of people with asthma maybe sensitive to sulphites.
  • Medication like aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and beta-blockers.

Allergens are all around us, therefore people with allergic asthma must understand their allergy and asthma triggers to prevent asthma symptoms.

The symptoms of asthma remains more or less the same whether or not an individual have nonallergic or allergic asthma. It may occur several times in a day or week, for some people, it may worsen with physical activities or at night. Failing to recognize and avoid triggers can result in an attack which can cause respiratory distress hospitalization and even death. Symptoms to look out for include some or all of the following:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Rapid breathing
  • Tightening of the chest
  • Production of lots of thick mucus

Genetics and Asthma

The cause of asthma is not fully understood, but research suggests, that the condition runs strongly in families. About 50% due to genetic susceptibility and 50% due to environmental factors. If one identical twin is affected, the probability of the other also having the condition is about 25%.

Increased incidence of asthma has been associated with urbanization, however, the exact relation between the two is unclear.


Medication for Asthma

Treatment for allergic asthma include:

  • Antihistamines, chlorpheniramine (piriton) are first generation antihistamines, the drug does what the name suggests, it work by blocking the action of the histamines on the body's cells by targeting special molecules known as receptors. Antihistamines help to relieve itching, stuffy nose and sneezing. Over the counter options include Benadryl and Tavist. These drugs can cause drowsiness, therefore, people taking them should avoid using heavy machinery and driving vehicles while taking them. There are new second generation non-sedating antihistamines available, such as, cetirizine, laratadine and fexofenadine. These drugs do not cross the blood brain barrier, therefore do not cause drowsiness.
  • Methylxanthine drug like Theophylline relaxes the smooth muscle of the airways to relieve asthma symptoms. This drug interacts with many other drugs should be closely monitored,
  • B2-adrenergic Receptor Agonist such as Solbutamol (Ventolin) help to relieve bronchospasm in condition such as asthma and other chronic respiratory disease. The drug maybe prescribed as asthma inhaler, tablets and in severe cases intravenously, usually in a hospital.
  • Leukotriene Antagonists work by blocking the action of chemicals known as leukotrienes, They include, Montelukast and Zileuton
  • Bronchodilators are drugs that helps to relieve chest tightness, they are usually prescribed when the narrowing of the airways is accompanied by coughing. Bronchodilators can reduce coughing, wheezing and difficult breathing and can be taken orally, by injection or inhaler. They include drugs like Ipratropium bromide (atrovent) an antimuscarinic bronchodilator.
  • Nasal decongestants, not usually recommended for children, this type of medicine can provide short-term relief for nasal congestion and is available as tablets or nasal spray.
  • Allergy shots, also known as immunotherapy, contains small amounts of the substances that triggers the allergic reaction. allergy shots are especially recommended for individuals who are unable to tolerate allergy medication, for those people who have severe allergy symptoms and those who develop asthma during the pollen season.
  • Corticosteriods works by preventing the production of chemical messengers (cytokines) responsible for the immediate inflammatory response after exposure to an allergen. Long term use can result in unwanted side effects. According to WHO, through treatment such as the use of inhaled corticosteroids to relieve bronchial inflammation, the number of asthma related deaths can be reduced.
  • Alternative medicine is an option some people will want to explore for relieving allergy symptoms. See chart.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approved New Drug

The first pill to replace some allergy shots has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but the immunotherapy drug, Oralair, produced by the French company Stallergenes only work against certain types of grass pollen and like allergy shots, the new drug takes about 4 months to start working, so it will not be in time to benefit the grass allergy suffers for this summer. The pill works against five types of grass pollen that are common in the US, Kentucky bluegrass, orchard, perennial rye, sweet vernal and Timothy.

The drug will be placed under the tongue, with a doctor's supervision for the first dose. This is to allow close observation for symptoms of possible severe allergic reactions. After the first dose of the drug has been safely administered, it can be taken at home, once daily.

According to the FDA, the medication reduced symptoms and the need for allergy medication by 16 to 30 per cent in studies. The pill is approved for people from age 10 to 65 and will be available in May, 2014.

Source

What Triggers Your Hay Fever or Asthma Attack

If you suffer from Asthma or Hay Fever, when do you experience the worst symptoms?

  • In the Spring
  • In the Summer
  • In the Autumn/ Fall
  • In the Winter
  • When I'm in an area with high levels of pollution
  • When I'm exercising
  • When I get angry or very emotional
  • When sitting in heavy traffic
See results without voting

Tips on the management of allergies

  • Know what triggers your allergy
  • Avoid triggers
  • Avoid dusty dank places such as attics and basements
  • Pollen is higher in the morning, do outdoor activities later in the day
  • Keep windows and doors closed at home or in the car
  • Wipe face and eyes when coming in from outside
  • Pull back long hair or wear a hat to lessen the amount of pollen that collect in the hair
  • Wash hair, shower and change into clean clothes on returning home
  • Wash bedding, especially pillowcases every few days
  • Use saline nose sprays to flush out the pollen, blow nose before using prescribed nasal spray to clean the sinuses and remove irritants
  • Change air conditioning filters in the home frequently, use those made specifically for pollen and allergens

Alternative or Natural Remedy to Relieve Allergy Symptoms

Natural Remedy
Action
Research
 
Butterbur (Petasites hybridus)
This European herb is one of the most popular herb, one tablet four times per day, proved to be as effective as antihistamine in controlling symptoms of grass allergy.
Study by Swiss Researchers published by The British Medical Journal.
 
Fresh nettle tea or Freeze-dried nettles (Urtica dioica)
may be able to reduce the amount of histamine released by the body in response to an allergen
National College of Naturopathic Medicine, Portland, Oregon.
 
Hydrastis Candiensis, tonic made from goldenseal herb
Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties
Recommended by doctors in addition to nasal spray. But there is insufficient research available to support the various health benefits.
 
Magnesium
Relaxes smooth muscles of the upper respiratory tract
Division of General Practice, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre. Oral magnesium and vitamin C supplement in asthma: a parallel randomized placebo-controlled trial
 
Omega 3 fatty acid
Helps to relieve inflammation. Work like the asthma drug, leukotriene inhibitors. Australia's Research concluded that dietary fatty acid may have beneficial effect on the prevalence of wheezing during the first 18 months of life
Clinical Epidemiology Unit The Children's Hospital Westmead University of Sidney, Australia.
 
Evening primrose oil
Rich in essential fatty acid known as GLA which is converted by the body to prevent inflammation
Need more research
 
Tumeric (Curcuma longa)
Contains compounds that inhibits the release of COX-2 prostaglandins hormone-like substances involve in the inflammatory process
Need More Research
 
Vitamins A, C and E
Vit C can improve short term airway responsiveness, especially effective for exercise induced asthma
Studies in The Turkish journal of pediatrics showed that levels of these three antioxidant vitamins were lower in asthmatic children than in normal healthy children
 
vitamin D
Research shows, Vit. D has the potential to significantly cut the symptoms of asthma
Kings College London
 
 
 
 
 
Middle Eastern Herbal Blend of Black cumin, chamomile, cinnamon, cloves, rosemary,sage,spearmint and thyme
Relaxes the tracheal muscles
need more researh
 
People who suffers from asthma should be cautious when taking all medication and supplements. Health care professions, doctors and herbal specialists should be consulted for the best possible outcome. .

Locally made honey is good for the immune system.

When local bees collect pollen from locally grown plants, small bits of pollen remains in the honey and can help with some seasonal allergies.
When local bees collect pollen from locally grown plants, small bits of pollen remains in the honey and can help with some seasonal allergies. | Source

List of trees that often trigger allergies

  • Ash
  • Aspen
  • Beech
  • Birch
  • Box elder
  • Cottonwood
  • Elm
  • Hickory
  • Mountain elder
  • Willow
  • Mulberry
  • Oak
  • Pecan

Some research suggests that dogs owned in childhood seemed to protect against adult allergic disease but promote non-allergic asthma

According to American Society for Microbiology, house dust from homes with dogs, appears to protect against infection with common respiratory virus associated with the development of asthma in children.
According to American Society for Microbiology, house dust from homes with dogs, appears to protect against infection with common respiratory virus associated with the development of asthma in children. | Source

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43 comments

tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Rebecca, sorry about you aunt, she was so very young. Unfortunately, the condition often runs in families, although asthma in particular, can be very serious, the treatment has improved a lot over the years. Thank you for the visit and comment, much appreciated.

Take care and my best to you.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

Hi, tobussiness. Great article! My family has been plagued with serious allergies and asthma for generations. An auntie that I never got to meet died in her 20s from asthma. Thanks for your diligent work on this.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Audrey, I hope you found what you needed. Always a pleasure to see you.

I hope all's well.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

This is such a great article. I came back to look at your alternative medicines for asthma---


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Crafty, so sorry to learn of your asthma. It's incredible how many people are currently suffering from allergies and asthma. We see many patients this time of the year with exacerbation of the condition. Thank you for reading this and for sharing you personal experience, it means a lot. Take care of yourself and my very best to you.


CraftytotheCore profile image

CraftytotheCore 2 years ago

This article is so important. I have asthma. I wasn't diagnosed until recently though. Over 10 years ago I was exposed to toxic mold in a building where I worked for 8 years. I suffered chronic health problems and eventually left that job and went to work at another company where I healed.

Two years ago, I was hospitalized for exasperated asthma for five days. No fun at all. I couldn't breath. I felt like I was going to die.

My triggers are dust mites and mold. I have to keep allergy covers on my bedding (mattresses and pillows). When I go outdoors to do yard work, I wear a mask.

Last year I couldn't breath around this time and ended up in the hospital again. It turned out I had bronchial spasms caused by asthma. It took 60 mg of prednisone to open my airways. I thought I was having a heart attack because of the chest pains.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Kim, thanks for reading this, and for the great comment. Chlorpheniramine maleate is one of the first generation antihistamine, so it does have a slight sedative effect.

A similar antihistamine, Brompheniramine led to the discovery of the first SSRI, zimelidine, used for antidepressant. Always nice to see you, take care and my best as always.


ocfireflies profile image

ocfireflies 2 years ago from North Carolina

Jo,

This is an amazing hub and presented thoroughly and professionally. I could so see this included in many different media. I have found that the only antihistamine that helps me must have chlorpheniramine sp?maleate which I am finding much more difficult to find. A definite V+/HP! Excellent Work!

Kim


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Frank, you're always wonderfully supportive and I appreciate it very much. Take care and my best as always.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

toobusiness I look forward to these types of hubs.. more so when you do them.. easy to follow and useful thanks for that :)


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Ann, you're welcome anytime. Take care and my best to you and the family.


annart profile image

annart 2 years ago from SW England

Thanks, Jo. No, he's not wheezy. Just susceptible as you say.

My hay fever is a grass thing from end of May to August sometime. It's much less severe than it used to be and I don't let it stop me going out - I love the countryside and flowers too much. Sunglasses are a must for me though, most of the year round, as my eyes are sensitive to bright light. My son-in-law's allergies seem to be more persistent though!

Thanks for the advice; much appreciated. Ann


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Ann, I guess family outings to the country side this time of the year is out of the question for you guys.

Children with asthma can have some of the same medication, but the important thing is ensuring that they get the right dosage. Therefore, it is important that the child see a doctor or paediatrician. There are special inhalers for children, that can deliver an exact measured dose of medication. There's also an annual nasal spray flu vaccine available on the NHS for children aged 2 and 3 which may help.

Your grandson may simply be one of those children who are quite prone to colds and flu, if there is no symptoms of shortness of breath and wheezing. If you think he may have asthma/allergies, it may be an idea to have a word with his parents. I hope the hay fever is not to bad at the moment , I also get the symptoms but it's relatively mild. Take care and my best to you.


annart profile image

annart 2 years ago from SW England

I have hay fever. My son-in-law has hay fever and asthma and so does his 3 year old son. I guess he's not the luckiest when it comes to asthma/hay fever genes! He nearly always has a cold, with lots of nasal mucus, and coughs a lot too. I don't know whether he's seen a doc about it all but I guess lots of the medication above are not suitable for children.

Thanks for this informative, comprehensive hub on this subject. Ann


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Theresa, thank you for letting me know how you got on at the clinic. It's good to know that you were seen and properly assessed.

The oil from the burning materials makes sense, especially since you've had a bad reaction in the past, it just goes to show how very careful we have to be with allergies. Your weekend land clearing sounds like hard work, but good fun, unfortunately sometimes nature bits back. Although you'll be feeling pretty awful at the moment, at least we know what caused the reaction and you can take the appropriate precaution for the next trip to farm. Get well soon, I hope there's someone at home who can pamper you a little, if not, HP can be a great way to distract yourself from the itching. :) Take care now, my best as always.


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Hi Jo. Back from the Advanced Care Clinic (my insurance is with KP, so this is an "almost" fully equipped ER, but way more technology and advanced staff than at a typical urgent care clinic. Its KP's way of keeping people out of ER room's (which in the US anyway, is the most expensive medical care) when they need attention, but its not a stroke or heart attack, or gun shot wound, etc.

They poo-poohed my explanation of fire ants and kept focusing on Poison Ivy (which I have had horrible reactions to in the past), but I was very careful, long sleeves, long pants, gloves etc wile I was working outside at the farmhouse. And I have it all over but my face is the worst.

Finally the question that led to the truth. Did you have a fire, burn the leaves and branches you collected? Yes we burned stuff from last weekend and this weekend and sat around a roaring fir from 5-8 pm. Which explains how the oil compound got all over my face from the smoke. Well, live and learn.

I got the shot in the hip, solu-medrol, I think and the step down package of prednisone as well -- 3 for 3, then 2 for 3, then 1 pill for three. Now if I can just keep from clawing myself. So I am off to take Benadryl and try the 15 min, on and off, ice packs that you suggested. Thanks again. Blessings. Theresa


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Theresa, it's better to be safe than sorry, I'm sure they'll be able to get you sorted and make you comfortable. Hope it all goes well for you.


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Hi Jo. Took more benadryl. Took a nap Swelling is worse and spreading. I am off to get the necessary corticosteroid shot. Thanks for the concern. It worries me too, and there is no point waiting any longer. :)


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

brutishspoon, thank you for the update, good luck with the new medication. It must be so very disheartening, having to explain to a five year old why she can't run and play on the grass with her friends. It's a tough call, I hope she will be one of lucky children who manages to outgrow the condition. bless her. Take care of her and my best to you both.


brutishspoon profile image

brutishspoon 2 years ago from Darlington, England

We have just had a hospital appointment and had her meds changed back to the liquid from the tablets her GP prescribed. Can you imagine a five year old trying to swallow a tablet? She cannot keep them down. We have another appointment in September so we will see how she goes this summer and hopefully we will see some improvement in her. She is a great kid who does not let her problems stop her enjoying time with her friends. She knows to be careful when she is on the grass.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Theresa, this sounds nasty, you may well need that shot. If it gets really bad maybe even an epinephrine shot.

If the reaction continues to spread, 8 to 24 hours after you were bitten, there should only be localized small fluid filled blisters, if the symptoms gets worst, don't chance it, get help. Try using an ice pack on the affected areas in the meantime. Use it off and on for 15 mins at a time, obviously, not directly on the skin. Let us know how you get on because I'm a bit concern. Take care and my best as always.


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 2 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Good Morning JO. I spent yesterday clearing and burning brush at the family Lake house. I also got bitten twice by a fir e ant. I woke up this morning just covered in itchy red welts. They have now spread to my face. Going to give the Benadryl a couple of hours, then I am going to go get a shot of corticosteroids.

And the first Hub I come too is this one -- about allergies! Now I am really itching all over. :) Great article, very thorough and full of useful information. Sharing, Theresa


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hello Brutishspoon, I can see how frustrating that would be for parents. With the prevalence of asthma raising rapidly, classroom teachers and school nurses should be able to help the children with asthma and allergies. However, if the child is of an age where she can understand her condition, I would suggest that you explain it to her in a way that is appropriate to her age, help her understand how to stay safe. But keep the pressure on the school's officials. While it isn't possible to protect the children from danger every minute of the day, they do have a duty of care while your daughter is under their control.

Thank you for stopping by, I appreciate the insightful comment. Hope your daughter's condition improves and good luck with the school.


brutishspoon profile image

brutishspoon 2 years ago from Darlington, England

My Daughter suffers from Allergic Asthma that is brought on my Dust Mites and Grass. She has to take Anti histamine medication regularly. At school she is allowed to run around on the grass and when she comes home she is covered in Eczema and her breathing is compromised. It annoys me that although the school know of her allergy they don't allow Tracksuits for PE and as such her skin comes into contact with the Grass making it worse for her than just breathing it in which is bad enough.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Ruby, not being able to have a pet because of allergies must be one of the saddest thing for an animal lover. Sorry to hear that the injection shot did not work for you. The new drug I mentioned, will be available in May in the US for treating a number of grass allergies, but it may be worth looking into. I really do think we're overdoing the germ free thing, we need to build up resistance, we can't do that in a sterile environment. Take care and my best to you.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Devika, I'm glad your little one no longer have asthma, some children can outgrow the condition, but in others, it can return later in life. Those children with severe asthma, unfortunately; are less likely to outgrow it. Always a pleasure to see you, have a lovely weekend.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

Great topic and great article. I have allergies, the worst being animal dander and mold. I went to an allergist for a few weeks but felt worse after receiving the injections. I take benadryl daily. I also use a nasal spray which is a corticosteriod. The worst part is not being able to have a pet. I love animals. sigh..I think you are correct about a too clean environment. When i was a child i had a cat and had no problems. Thank's for a very useful hub....


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Jodah, interesting that three of your children had asthma, when neither you nor your wife ever suffered from the condition. There may well be a genetic connection, but the environment in which you and your wife grow up may have protected you from the condition. We appear to need a better balance between cleanliness and a little exposure to nature. Thank you for stopping by, much appreciated. Have a wonderful weekend.


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

A well-informed hub indeed. You mentioned all that needs attention and so much to learn here about such allergic issues. My son had allergic problem in the Springtime as he got older it seems to have disappeared. Voted up, useful interesting.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Jackie, like you, I think the hygiene theory makes good sense. Our lives have become so sanitized, we can't build up the antibodies we need to fight simple infections. Children are practically reared in a protective bubble, it can't be good for them. The hygiene hypothesis isn't that different from the idea of immunization as you've so rightly pointed out. I could not resist that photo, it's the work of a young Russian women, her work is amazing. Take care, my best to you and have a lovely weekend.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Jamie, thank you for reading this. Always a pleasure to see you, take care and my best to you and the family.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Nell, I'm so glad you've found this useful, an asthma attack can be a very scary experience, especially for children. It's important to have a good understanding about what can trigger it, looks like you're on top of it, but it's possible that you may have become sensitive to other allergens. If your current medication is not as effective as it used to be, It may be an idea to get retested. Generally, people with asthma have a good knowledge of their condition which is good, but there are always new plants and grasses around, so have a chat with you doctor. Thanks for stopping by, great to see you and my best as always.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Faith, you my friend, is always on time, massively supportive and very much appreciated. :)

Thank you for returning. I don't know about HOTD, I'm just happy if the people who read my hubs find them useful. Sorry about your allergy, it must be hard coping with it year round. The exercise induced asthma is caused by breathing through the mouth when we're exercising. Normally, during normal breathing, the air is warmed and moistened by the nasal passage, cold dry air causes contraction of the airways which can cause the problem you've experienced when you exercise. Next time you plan you exercise, remember to use your bronchodilator inhaler well before you begin. Enjoy you family weekend and have fun, we've just returned from a long walk in the country side where we used to live before we moved to Bedfordshire, I'm settling down now to watch the Grand National, fingers crossed, hoping to win big. ;) My best to you all.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Flourish, nut allergy can be pretty frightening, peanuts are the most common cause of fatal allergic reaction to food, so please be careful with those bags of bird feed. It's always good to see you, take care and my best as always.


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Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

What a terrific article Jo. Three of my children had asthma, when younger but only my daughter still suffers as an adult. I agree totally with the hygiene hypothesis. Australia has the highest per capita incidence of asthma in the world and has been increasing. I believe it coincides with the decrease in farming and crop production as a major industry and more people moving to the city to live. We drank unpasteurized milk when I was a child and none of my siblings or myself had asthma. There was no asthma in my wife's family either, but three of our children suffered. Anyway, voted up.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Hmm, well, I am not seeing any share buttons, so I shall return!


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

This hub deserves a HOTD hands down! Wow, you have written one excellent hub here, and the imagery is awesome as well. That first one just jumps out at you, and now I see what is inside me that is giving me fits, especially now that Spring has sprung. However, I seem to have reactions all year and when I do exercise : ) it does get worse.

I have learned so much from this insightful hub here. Adorable photo at the end.

I am sorry for arriving so late to your hub, but I picked up my three grands this evening after work, and they are here for the weekend ... so just a tad bit busy until they conk out in bed.

Up and more, tweeting, pinning and sharing!

Enjoy your weekend ... you deserve a break after putting so much into this hub!

Blessings,

Faith Reaper


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

Wow, Jo; this is really good. I sort of go with the hygiene hypothesis in sort of like the bee sting, or if you will a type of immunization of nature. I do wonder sometimes if we don't protect our children too much from dirt and germs...allergens.

Love that last photo. ^+


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

Great article! I have suffered from asthma ever since I was a child so I get to know what triggers it, but I have learned a lot more here, sometimes I get hay fever or pollen trouble and other times it just doesn't seem to have an effect, this is great! I will bookmark it so if I get an unknown attack of asthma or allergy I can come back to see what it could be, great hub Jo!


jhamann profile image

jhamann 2 years ago from Reno NV

Amazing article! Congratulations! Jamie


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FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

This is comprehensive, as all of your fabulous hubs are! I suffer from specific nut and tree allergies that have sprung up as an adult, and they are so bad that even when I purchase bags of birdfood (in 40 lb bags), I can't even put them in the back seat of my car for the ride home without having a breathing episode. It's a little scary.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Bill, I wasn't aware that Bev suffered from asthma, so sorry. I get hay fever in the spring, right now as a matter of fact, but asthma can be a tough call. I hope Bev is not too bad at the moment, get her to check out the new French drug for next season. A pleasure to see you, I'm just off to bed, so good night to you and my very best to you both.


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billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

What a great article, Jo! You really did a wonderful job of informing. The research and information is topnotch. As you know, Bev has asthma. It comes and it goes. Dust is a biggie for her and she really has not found a remedy for it all. I'll pass this on to her and I thank you for it.

Have a wonderful weekend my friend.

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