Arthritis Relief with Stinging Nettle Tea

The Stinging Nettle
The Stinging Nettle

Commonly regarded as a weed by most people, stinging nettles are known for their propensity to grow anywhere without encouragement, and the nasty sting they cause when grabbed by the unwary gardener.

Although this chemically induced sting is the cause of much discomfort and infamy for the stinging nettle, it is also the reason why the stinging nettle is such a medicinally useful plant.

By knowing how to treat the stinging nettle and turn it into a natural tea, you can enjoy a free, naturally occurring drink with many benefits to your health.

How Does it Work?

Historically, relief from arthritis with stinging nettles was achieved by topically applying the herb directly onto the skin of the affected area.

However, no studies have confirmed the link between this method of treatment and an actual reduction in pain. Evidence to support this practice is purely anecdotal. This is not to suggest that a link doesn’t exist though – merely that science has yet to verify it.

In light of this you may wish to consider making stinging nettle tea a part of your regular diet, along with topical applications of stinging nettle to the areas of your body affected by arthritis.

Beneficial for much more than arthritis treatment, stinging nettle tea has a very long list of health benefits indeed. By incorporating stinging nettle tea into your diet, you will enjoy the beneficial side effects to your health, as they spill over into other areas of your life.

Make Your Own Stinging Nettle Tea!

The Cheapest and Healthiest Arthritis Remedy Ever?

Being freely available in the natural environment and completely organically grown, stinging nettles are probably the most cost-effective treatment for the symptoms of arthritis ever discovered.

If you can, try to pick the nettles yourself. This will give you ultimate control over both the quality and composition of the brew you make. You can blend stinging nettles with other readily available herbs to create a blend perfectly suited to your tastes, body, and problems.

If you do not have access to stinging nettles in your immediate environment, do not worry. You can buy pre-made stinging nettle tea from many health food stores on the internet. Alternatively, you can see your local health food store, chemist or homeopath.

If you’d like to brew your own stinging nettle tea, I’ve prepared a guide for you.

If you’ve like to learn about the benefits of stinging nettle tea to other areas of your health, then please check out the related links section below.  

What’s been your experiences using stinging nettle tea to relieve the pain and discomfort of arthritis? Let us know in the comments section below.

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7 comments

izettl profile image

izettl 6 years ago from The Great Northwest

Very interesting- will do some research on this. Don't suppose you would know if this also applies to the autoimmune disease Rheumatoid Arthritis? I suffer from anemia too so this is great info to read- thanks


Cole C profile image

Cole C 6 years ago from Chicago

Unfortunately a lot of professionals play down the effects of herbal tea, but I think herbal teas have a lot of medicinal value. Thanks for the article.


katiem2 profile image

katiem2 6 years ago from I'm outta here

This is fantastic news for arthritis suffers, which is many. The video is amazing, I'm going on a Nettle hunt...next spring! Must share this and rate it up!


ceciliabeltran profile image

ceciliabeltran 6 years ago from New York

It is consistent. I was just talking my husband about Broccoli. It turns out that the reason why its good for you is it poisons you enough to make your immune system stronger!

Yin Yang indeed. I think the Stinging Nettle Tea would probably have the same effect. Because it hurts you a little bit, it makes your system produce things that alleviates chronic pain! Really cool.


msms profile image

msms 6 years ago

so we have to know how 'Stinging Nettle Tea' looks like rest it is all you have nicely explained in your Hub above. Can it be grown in Pots?


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 5 years ago

Sounds good. I know where that is! I've been stung. Great post!


Irene O`Riley 3 years ago

A few times now, I have rubbed the leaves of stinging nettle to joints which were a bit swollen and painful - particularly the knee - and the result was more or less immediate: reduction of swelling in the part where nettle was applied, reduction or absence of pain, resotred mobility.

I experience that nettle removes inflammation from the joint(s) by local application. This effect lasts for a number of days or 2 weeks, ie. with one application. I have not tried nettle tea yet but will begin - Now!

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