What should be the Rep Range for building a perfect body?

First of all, I would like to thanks London_guide for asking such an important question on rep range which is a prominent aspect of bodybuilding and weight training.

For your knowledge, I would say first of all that muscles don't count reps.

So the numbers could be completely different for someone who takes 10 seconds to complete one rep, compared to someone who takes 2 seconds for each rep

So here comes in the Law of Individual Differences.

Hopelessly wrong. The rep range determines the pathway of energetics that a muscle is training through and the metabolic adaptation that results. 1 to 2 reps uses ATP and strengthens the contractile elements of muscle tissues, as well as neuromuscular control over the activation of motor units. 3 to 6 reps uses creatine phosphate.

Lift faster to activate more muscles

Best rep range
Best rep range
Workout in a gym
Workout in a gym
Rep range chart for biceps
Rep range chart for biceps
Rep range is important as you must know how many times and how much force is applied
Rep range is important as you must know how many times and how much force is applied
Some chair exercises
Some chair exercises

Training in this pathway increases strength as your body gets better adapted at using creatine to replenish ATP supply. 8 to 12 reps causes catabolization of type IIb myoactin fibers which release IGF I and II, that combine with somatotrophin and glycogen overcompensation to produce growth. 20 to 25 reps tends to use oxygen, and leads to an increase in capilerization and mitochondrial proliferation.Lifting 1 rep for 10 seconds WILL NOT ACCOMPLISH the same thing as lifting multiple reps at a faster speed for 10 seconds. You're living in a fantasy world if you honestly believe this. The neuro input, enegetic pathway, motor unit activation, enzymatic processes, and a host of other factors make fast reps completely alien to slow reps. Super slow training completely ineffective at best, and catabolic / muscle wasting / strength lowering at worst.This is a very important concept that got lost over years.Yea, I'm sure all the thousands of scientists and PhDs all around the world "lost" this "valuable concept" made up by a 9th grade educated hick with no bodybuilding or powerlifting achievements who's academic background includes sitting in his Florida home thumbing through magazines and coming up with his own ideas on science and history then talking like he somehow 'discovered' it.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jee-PtF3xAWhen studies were done that showed 8 - 12 repetitions was the optimal number of reps in a set for most people, the accepted cadence was 2 seconds for the raising (positive) part of the rep and 4 seconds (negative) for the lowering of the weight.What studies? You constantly say "studies", yet you can never list them.>>The very concept of TUT just did not become famous but the rep range did.Is it possible that everyone knows about TUT, but you're just wrong in how you understand it? After all, most of your articles refer to only 2 people, both of which had no real education. They literally "made it up".What strikes me as funny is that this can only be done with fitness science. In any other field, this would not be tolerated. Imagine your doctor coming up with his own zany ideas completely irrespective of medical science, or a physics professor teaching kids that an object remains in motion unless an outside force causes it to stop - SOMETIMES, or that gravity is an inherent property of matter - only if you want it to be.Counting seconds while you count the rep is a very tough job.The TUT/reps per set that is appropriate for you is also determined by your muscle fiber make up and your neuromuscular efficiency.( neuromuscular efficiency is the ability to contract a large number of fibers at one time).And yet the slower you lift, the FEWER muscles you activate. The faster you lift, the more muscles you activate. An all out ballistic curl activates all muscle fibers in the biceps, and most, if not all, muscles in the stabilizers and surrounding muscles. A rep that takes 6 seconds requires extremely few muscle fibers, and the lactic acid build up is likely to interfere with ATP regeneration before an adequate stimulus can be achieved.

Once again, if you have any questions, please leave a comment below.

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Do you have some other points to discuss, share below 11 comments

Jarrod Lucky 8 years ago

Great information. Thanks for giving the valuable information about reps. Its a great skill of yours to put the advantages of reps and how they help in muscle building. I believe the best rep range is required to have a perfect body. Please keep me update with new information if you. Thanks for the nice hub.


Rajat Issar 7 years ago

Though I am not a professional bodybuilder or weightlifter on my own but I am going to gym for the last 8 years and I know the importance of rep ranges in working out at gyms. Yes, I also agree that the best rep range is required to have a good body. Rep ranges are as important as diet in the field of exercise.


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soni2006 7 years ago from New Delhi, India Author

Thanks Jarrod and Rajt for visiting this hub and your comments. I am going to write more hubs on bodybuilding as I have found that there are a lot of people over here who are fitness enthusiasts and bodybuilding lovers. I will write out something new and useful and more energetic for my audience.


Brandon 7 years ago

Hi thanks you explained alot of questions i had. But i was just wondering if i did faster reps and activated more muscle fibers like you said would that make me looked more ripped.


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soni2006 7 years ago from New Delhi, India Author

Yes any person doing faster repetitions and activating maximum amount of muscle fibers will look more ripped and toned. It is for sure.


JAROD 7 years ago

does it matter if the eccentric part of the exercise is slow, fast or controlled in relation to muscle growth?


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soni2006 7 years ago from New Delhi, India Author

Why not leave it at a controlled states Jarod rather doing it slow and fast.


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yyn1221 6 years ago from China

Though I am not a professional bodybuilder or weightlifter on my own but I am going to gym for the last 8 years and I know the importance of rep ranges in working out at gyms. Yes, I also agree that the best rep range is required to have a good body. Rep ranges are as important as diet in the field of exercise.


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soni2006 5 years ago from New Delhi, India Author

Thanks yyn1221 for sharing your personal experience of benefits of rep range in the field of fitness.


researcher in sports medicine 4 years ago

This is the dumbest article I have ever read, maybe if you did any sort of literature review and examined the methodology you wouldn't just be spewing nonsense. Time under tension is very important for hypertrophy. Yes fast lifting does have its place. But if you want maximum hypertrophy slower is much better.


Jason 4 years ago

I am no huge bodybuilder myself however I have worked out on and off for years. I have done some research on my own. Not to mention the time I have spent in the gym. I agree that you if you do a rep range that is excessively long that it's probably going to add extra lactic acid build up. Dynamic training is what I think they are calling it. Is where you put a decent amount of weight on and you explosively lift it. Every rep like your maxing it. That I believe is the best way to lift. It doesn't necessarily have to be a maximum amount of weight. But lift it as if it is.

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