Causes Of Deafness and Hearing Impairment

How sound is your Hearing?

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Anatomy of the ear

There are three parts to the ear, the outer, the middle and the inner ear.
There are three parts to the ear, the outer, the middle and the inner ear.

Hair Cells Within the Cochlea of the Inner Ear

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Parts of the Inner Ear, showing the Cochlea

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Symptoms and early signs of Hearing impairment

You may have early signs of hearing loss when:

  • You have difficulty in understanding what people are saying
  • Your family complains that TV or radio are too loud
  • You find that sounds are muffled, often need to ask people to repeat their sentences
  • You avoiding social situations, because of inability to communicate properly
  • You have trouble using the telephone
  • You have whistling, buzzing, ringing or humming in the ears

Deafness Facts

Deafness is the complete loss of hearing in one or both ears, hearing loss is both complete and partial loss of the ability to hear.

  • One in three people suffers from hearing loss by the age of 65.
  • 60% of people with hearing loss are in the work force or in educational settings.
  • An estimated 30 children per 1000 have some degree of hearing loss.
  • The most common causes of hearing loss in adult is due to noise and aging.
  • Changes in the inner ear due to presbycusis or age-relating hearing loss happen slowly, it may be mild or severe but always permanent.
  • Sudden noise induced hearing loss such as gunfire and explosions is the highest cause of disability in recent wars.
  • Most people with moderate to profound hearing loss live in low or moderate income countries.
  • There are 360 million people world wide with disabling hearing loss.
  • Chronic ear infections are major causes of hearing loss. Chronic otitis media range from 1% to 46% in both developed and developing countries.
  • Noise is a leading cause of avoidable hearing loss. The risk of social noise is increasing globally among young people.
  • Some frequently used medication such as aminoglycosides and anti-malarial drugs can cause irreversibly hearing loss.
  • Around 0.5 to 5 of every 1000 children are born with or develop disabling hearing loss in early childhood.
  • With public health actions, 50% of hearing loss is preventable through immunization, healthy ear, hearing care habits and effective treatment for acute and chronic ear conditions.
  • An estimated 56 million people world wide uses hearing aid, the current hearing aid production meet only 3% of the need in developing countries.
  • Generally, severe tinnitus or (ringing in the ears) will accompany hearing loss and can be just as debilitating as the hearing loss. about 1:10 adults in the UK have mild tinnitus, up to 1% have tinnitus that affects their quality of life.
  • Causes of hearing loss include a build-up of earwax, foreign object in the ear, injury to the head or ear, infection, ruptured eardrum and conditions that affect the inner or middle ear.

Hearing loss, UK's Statistics

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Protect hearing from noise at work

Under The control of noise at work regulation 2005, Employers are responsible for ensuring that their workers are protected from exposure to noise above 85dB.
Under The control of noise at work regulation 2005, Employers are responsible for ensuring that their workers are protected from exposure to noise above 85dB. | Source

Noise in the work place

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Hearing Impairment may be caused by a build up of ear wax

Cerumen or ear wax is produced by thousand of glands in the ear, contains waxy oil, dead skin cells and antibacterial enzyme known as lysozyme.
Cerumen or ear wax is produced by thousand of glands in the ear, contains waxy oil, dead skin cells and antibacterial enzyme known as lysozyme. | Source

Causes of Deafness and Hearing Impairment

We are living in a noisy world, the incidence of deafness and hearing impairment is growing. The ability to hear and distinguish sound is said to be one of the most important of our five senses.

However, if I were to ask the blind man, which of his senses are more important to him, he will answer my sight, the masseuse will say touch, for the florist and perfumer it may be the ability to smell, for the gourmet chef it's all about the taste.

All five senses are important to us, but the lack of some senses can be more disabling than others. Partial or complete loss of hearing is referred to as deafness, hearing loss or hearing impairment.

Some people have an acute hearing; they are said to be able to hear a pin drop, while others who are profoundly deaf, exists in a world without sound.

Voltaire referred to the ear as " the road to the heart." Sound can have a profound effect on our emotions. Most people find it near impossible to turn a deaf ear to an infant's cry; this particular sound can trigger emotional responses in the brain like no other sound can, even in people who are not parents.

Listening to romantic music can indeed stir the emotions, while persistently loud, unpleasant noises have been known to drive people to the brink of insanity. Sound can also have an adverse impact on our health. A loud bang close to the ear, such as an explosion, gunshot, or long-term exposure to noises like loud music and machinery, can damage the delicate organs of the inner ear to cause irreversible hearing loss and deafness.

Hearing impairment or hearing loss is defined by the quietest level of sound an individual can hear and is known as the hearing threshold measured in decibels (dB).

The hearing threshold is used to categorise an individual's ability to hear. Normal hearing is classified as no impairment. Hearing impairment may be mild, moderate, severe or profound.

Individuals with mild hearing loss may find it difficult to follow speech in a noisy situation. For people with moderate hearing loss, following speech without the use of a hearing aid can be a real challenge.

An average of 40dB to 69dB would be the quietest sound someone with moderate hearing loss will be able to hear.

Where there is a severe hearing loss, the individual relies a great deal on lipreading even when a hearing aid is used, the quietest sound this person can hear average around 70dB and 94dB.

Someone with a Profound hearing impairment has an average threshold level of 80dB or worse and may not be able to hear any sound at all.

One of the very first sense we develop while still safely cocooned within our mother's womb is sound, the most powerful sound to the growing fetus is the sound of its mother's voice.

Research shows that a five seconds stimulation can cause changes in the fetal heart rate and movement that can last up to an hour. It is widely believe that the last sense we lose before we die is our ability to hear.

Personally, I find it hard to imagine a world without sound. sweet, soothing music that helps us relax, the natural sound of a babbling brook, the wind in the trees, birds singing, raindrops on windows. For many of us, certain types of music can move us to tears. Conversely; research has suggested that the body can react negatively to loud noises such as aeroplane sounds, even as we sleep.

New research has shown that the human body respond to some noise by producing stress hormones, hormones that are usually produced when we perceive a threat, they prepare us for fight or flight.

The exposure to loud noises can also trigger a surge of stress hormones that causes a rise in blood pressure, heart rate and disturbances in the hormonal balance, with certain health implications. All these conditions can be precursors to cardiovascular disease. The adverse effects of noise on our physiology are also seen in children.

A 1990s study of children in Munich, during a period before and after the city airport was closed, found that stress hormone levels were higher in these children and memory and reading comprehension were lower. There were a marked improvement in the scores once the airport was moved to a different location. However, children who were newly exposed to the sonic noise, displayed the same detrimental effects.

Disabling Hearing Loss as Defined By The World Health Organisation (WHO)

Disabling hearing loss refers to hearing loss greater than 40dB in the better hearing ear in adults (15 years or older) and greater than 30dB in the better hearing ear in children (0 to 14 years)”

The UK charity organisation, Action on Hearing Loss, have estimated that over 10 million, or 1 in 6 people in the UK have some degree of deafness or hearing impairment.

According to the WHO, 5.3% of the world's population, that is 360 million people worldwide, are affected by disabling hearing loss:

  • 328 million or 91% are adults

  • 183 million are male

  • 145 million are female

  • 32 million or 9% are children

Approximately 1/3 of people over the age of 65 years are affected by disabling hearing loss

Loss of hearing can happen suddenly, but more often, it develops gradually over a period. Many of us are living and working in environments where the noise levels are above that which is safe, although there are health and safety laws in place to prevent this.

I began to experience mild deafness and intermittent buzzing in the ear (tinnitus) a few years ago; I'm pretty sure that I sustained a degree of hearing impairment from years of working in close proximity to a lot of extremely loud intensive care equipment.

For critical care nurses, it is impossible to avoid the daily assault of noise on the eardrums. ICU nurses must, at times work in enclosed cubicles where they are constantly bombarded by noise from monitor alarms, infusion pump alarms, dialysis machine alarms and the constant rhythmic humming of ventilators on a daily basis.

Thankfully; while Critical Care Units will always be far too noisy, most of the old equipment are now updated with next generation quietier models, with a positive impact on noise levels. Unfortunately, for those of us who soldiered on through the 70s, 80s and 90s the damage is already done.

We've known for a long time that regular prolonged exposure to noise is a risk factor for hearing loss. More than 30 million American are exposed to hazardous levels of sound on a regular basis. Noise Induced Hearing Loss or (NIH), may be caused by a single exposure to an intense impulse sound, or by continuous exposure to loud sounds over an extended period.

What is Tinnitus

Tinnitus is typically described as ringing, buzzing, humming, singing, whistling or whooshing in the ears. Research has shown that if left in complete silence in a sound reduction chamber, tinnitus would become apparent in the majority of people. In a silence environment, 90% to 95% of people have reportedly experienced the odd incidence of tinnitus.

Ringing in the ear, deafness and hearing loss affects a large section of the population. the incidence of people with hearing loss have doubled in the past 30 years.

A study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins show that almost 20% of Americans aged 12 and older have hearing loss sufficiently severe to make communication difficult.

Around 30 million people in the US were found to have hearing loss in both ears, 48 million had hearing loss in one ear.

Hearing loss is divided into two main types, conductive and sensorineural. When the two kinds of hearing loss are present at the same time, this is referred to as “mixed” hearing loss.

Conductive hearing loss

Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound is unable to pass freely to the inner ear. This type of hearing loss can be due to a build up of ear wax in the ears, or as commonly occurs in children, an infection resulting in the build up and accumulation of fluid in the inner ear.

Abnormalities in the structure of the outer ear, middle ear or ear canal can also result in a conductive hearing loss, as do ruptured eardrum.

Otosclerosis is a condition that causes abnormal growth of bone in the middle ear, resulting in a severe conductive hearing loss, when the ossicles in the middle ear are unable to move freely. This type of hearing loss causes the sound to become quieter, while not necessarily distorted.

Conductive hearing loss can be temporary or permanent based on the cause and may be corrected by minor surgery or medical management.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss

The majority of sensorineural hearing loss is caused by abnormalities in the hair cells found in the organ of Corti in the cochlea. Sensorineural hearing loss is usually referred to as sensory, cochlea, neural or inner ear hearing loss or impairment, and can also involve the auditory portions of the brain. This type of hearing loss changes the ability to hear quiet sounds and reduces the quality of the sound heard.

An individual with sensorineural hearing impairment will find it difficult to understand speech. Once the hair cells of the cochlea are damaged, they remain damaged, sensorineural hearing loss is irreversible.

The cochlea can become damaged naturally as a result of the ageing process; this is referred to as age-related hearing loss or presbycusis.

© J. Alexis-Hagues 23/05/2014

Tinnitus is likened to an angry bee buzzing inside the head

Tinnitus affects around 10% of the world's population.
Tinnitus affects around 10% of the world's population. | Source

Exposure to prolonged noise can cause hearing impairment

The sound of a jet engine is around 120 decibels, the same level as a loud rock music concert. While some sounds are considered a nuisance similar levels are pleasurable. Nuisance or pleasure, prolonged exposure to loud noises can damage the ear.
The sound of a jet engine is around 120 decibels, the same level as a loud rock music concert. While some sounds are considered a nuisance similar levels are pleasurable. Nuisance or pleasure, prolonged exposure to loud noises can damage the ear. | Source

Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss

Sensorineural hearing loss
Causes
Treatment
Age
Gradual damage to the hair cells
Sensorineural hearing loss is irreversible and permanent. Once the sensitive hair cells in the cochlea are damaged, they remain damaged and cannot be repaired. However, where hearing is impaired, the condition may be improved with certain treatment such as hearing aids, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants
Noise
Noise induced hearing loss are caused by exposure to extremely loud noises, acoustic trauma may result from exposure to high decibel noise like an explosion.
Early intervention may have a role in the medical treatment of acoustic trauma. Animal studies have shown that hyperbaric oxygenation and corticoid therapy can result in significant improvement in recovery.
Ototoxic drugs
Drugs that are toxic to the ear, more spicifically, the cochlea or auditory nerve. Drugs include antibiotics in the aminoglycosides group, diuretics such as frusemide and platinum based chemotherapy agents and some nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDS).
 
Viral infections of the inner ears
Measles and Mumps
 
Viral infections of the auditory nerve
Mumps and Rubella
 
Meniere's disease
Increased pressure in the inner ear due to a build up of fluid.
 
Acoustic neuroma
Benign growth on or near the auditory nerve
 
Meningitis
An Infection of the protective membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord
 
Encephalitis
Inflammation of the brain
 
Multiple sclerosis
neurological condition affecting the central nervous system
 
Cerebral vascular accident or stroke
blood supply to the brain is interrupted or cut off
 
Vasculitis
Inflammation and swelling within the ear.
Inflammatory conditions such as vasculitis and acute sensorineural loss are treated with steroids
Autoimmune inner ear disease
Damage to the inner ear by antibodies or immune cells.
Hearing impairment may respond to steriod treatment.
Genetic predisposition
 
 
Certain birth complication
 
 
Injuries to ears or head
The structure of the inner ear can be injured by trauma to cause bleeding, fluid imbalance, ruptured eardrum or damage to the cochlea causing temporary or permanent hearing loss.
 
Always see your doctor if you are concern about hearing loss.

Ototoxic Drugs that can cause hearing impairment

Certain groups of drugs such as aminoglycosides are ototoxic and can damage the sensory cells the ear.
Certain groups of drugs such as aminoglycosides are ototoxic and can damage the sensory cells the ear. | Source

The Cochlea, Construction of a Computational model

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The Ossicles

The stirrup one of the Ossicls, exerts force on the Tympanic membrane to transmit sound pressure information into the inner ear.
The stirrup one of the Ossicls, exerts force on the Tympanic membrane to transmit sound pressure information into the inner ear.

Causes of hearing loss

Do you suffer from hearing loss, if yes, what do you believe caused it?

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How we hear

The ear is divided into three parts:-

The Outer ear

The outer ear is known as the 'pinna' with ridged cartilage covered by the skin. Sound travels through the air in waves that enter the outer ear and moves through short tunnels approximately 25 millimetres long. When the sound waves reach the thin layer of skin known as the tympanic membrane or eardrum, it vibrates.

The Middle ear

The pressurised space behind the eardrum is the middle ear whose job is to transmit sound from air to fluid efficiently.

Sound travels from the outer ear causing movements of the eardrum and the three small bones, known collectively as the ossicles and conduct sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear.

The fluid-filled inner ear converts sound into nerve impulses which it sends to the brain.

The Inner ear

The semicircular canals in the inner ear, also known as the bony labyrinth serve as the balance organ. The cochlea acts as the body's microphone filled with a watery liquid that moves to vibrations from the middle ear.

As the fluid moves, thousands of 'hair cells' also moves causing a motion that converts into electric signals. The signals communicate through neurotransmitters to the large numbers of nerve cells that are subsequently interpreted by the brain as sound.

Structure of the middle ear

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44 comments

tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 22 months ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi peachpurple, sorry to learn about you dad, I hope the information prove to be useful. My best to you both.


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 22 months ago from Home Sweet Home

my dad should read this and understand why he is deaf


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi moonlake, sorry to learn that you family are affected by otosclerosis. The condition can be inherited but more research is needed. It can be frustrating when people simple refuses to understand, especially in cases like this, where a little knowledge and understanding of the condition can make such a difference to a child's ability to learn. Thank you for the insightful comment and the visit, always a pleasure to see you, take care and my best to you.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America

Many members of my family have Otosclerosis. My brother has had this since a young child. I can't tell you how many times, as his big sister, I had to get him out of class because the teacher claimed he wasn't listening and she was mad, even though my mother had told the school he had hearing loss.

My niece lost her hearing from Meningitis.

Voted up on your hub.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Vellur, a pleasure to see you. It's surprising that any of us can still hear, with so many factors affecting our ability to hear. :) The ear is a clever but delicate piece of machinery, we need to take care of it. I'm glad you were able learn something new. Have a wonderful weekend and my best to you.


Vellur profile image

Vellur 2 years ago from Dubai

Great educational hub about the causes of hearing impairment. Now I know more about the causes, never knew about some that you have mentioned in the table that you have presented.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Shyron, what is it about teenagers and loud music? If their ear drums aren't bursting they're not having fun. I'm sorry to learn about your son who was born deaf, it must have been a difficult time for the family, with a lot of adjusting. How old is your son now, and how is he coping? I hope you're all doing well, thank you for sharing a little about yourself and your family, adversity, they say, makes us stronger, I already know that you are a pretty special lady, take care, hugs and blessing right back at you. :)


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 2 years ago

Jo, this hits so close to home. One of my sons was born deaf and the other son played his music so loud he has become hard of hearing. My husband also being a carpenter and working around the saws that make so much noise.

My mom, heard many secrets whispered across a room.

This is so awesome and I voted that way.

Blessings and hugs to you and thank you.

Shyron


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Devika, I'm so glad your son's hearing is alright. I know a couple of people like the individual in his sixties who refuses to accept that he is experiencing hearing loss. Unfortunately, this makes life difficult for everyone around them. The problem may be easily solved by the use of a hearing aid, there are many different types on the market. Thank you for coming back, much appreciated and my very best to you and the family.


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Hi tobusiness my son does not have an ear problem we were discussing another individual in his sixties and having hearing issues. Some how the man does not think he has a problem with hearing . I think he does not want to admit that he he has problem hearing. My best to you. Thank you.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Flourish, so glad you liked the hub. I guess hearing loss is one of those things that comes with age, I just wish I'd given it more thought when I was younger.

The youngsters have a saying, "if the music is too loud, you're too old," They don't realise the damage they are doing to their health. Thank you so much for the visit, comment and pin, always appreciated.

Take care and my best to you.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi ARUN KANTI, I totally agree with you, with these conditions, we should be looking at education and prevention and at an early age. When we are young we tend to think we are invincible, but we pay the price in later years.

Thank you for the insightful comment and visit, always a pleasure to see you.


ARUN KANTI profile image

ARUN KANTI 2 years ago from KOLKATA

An excellent article giving us the scope to know much about the organ we normally neglect and an alarming hearing loss problem. In this noisy world such dissemination of proper knowledge should begin from the school level such caring people as the author should be involved in the process.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

This is a superb article, Jo. You are so thorough in providing research, multi-media, and your personal perspective. I'm sorry to learn that you have experienced it to some degree. Voted up and more, plus pinning to my Health and Medical Interest board.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hello ratnaveera, sorry to hear about you relative, As far as I'm aware, there is no specific cure for autism. Children with autism can display different medical conditions, each one is unique, treatment will depend on each child's specific need. Thank you for reading and commenting, very much appreciated.

Best wishes to you.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Quildon, nice to see you, thank you for stopping by and for the great comment and vote. I was surprised by the number of people who are suffering from hearing loss, There should be no stigma in wearing a hearing aid, but for people who are not comfortable with this, there are hearing aids that are not visible, only you know you're wearing it, Don't miss out on what's going on around you. Have a lovely day and my very best to you.


ratnaveera profile image

ratnaveera 2 years ago from Cumbum

Very informative article about hearing impairment and deafness. This would be really useful for the ones having these problems. A ten years old boy in my relation circle has been seriously suffering from Autism. Is there any effective treatment for Autism these days? Thanks in advance for your reply comment. Again thanks for this wonderful article, tobusiness! Voted up!


quildon profile image

quildon 2 years ago from Florida

Lots of great information here with accompanying diagrams. I believe I have mild hearing loss. If someone whispers in my ear I will not hear what they say, and I sometimes don't understand what someone is saying. I have been putting off having my ear checked for the longest while for fear I will have to wear a hearing aid, but it's good to know that there are other treatments available. Voted up and useful.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Lisavanvorst, nice to meet you. It does sound like you may have a mild loss of hearing, It's worth getting the doctor or ear nose and throat (ENT) specialist to have another look at your ears. Explain about about the ringing in the ears and how you hear sound. It may simple be a build up of wax, but since they have already checked and found noting significant, I would insist on another test. Good luck, thank you for the visit and comment, much appreciated.

Best wishes to you.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

MG Singh, thank you for stopping by, much appreciated.

My best to you.


MG Singh profile image

MG Singh 2 years ago from Singapore

Nice informative hub.


lisavanvorst profile image

lisavanvorst 2 years ago from New Jersey

I had my hearing checked and they said I was fine. I disagree however. Sometimes when people are talking I hear differently not severe maybe something like someone said house and I thought mouse. I also at times when laying down get that ringing in my ears or my ears sort of get muffled then pop. I wearing ear plugs to bed cause I hate noise and I know this can cause was buildup, so maybe that's the culprit. Anyway this was a great and informative article.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Michelle, I read your incredible article about the tumour, not an easy thing to deal with at any age, but for a young child, it must have been very frightening. Sorry about the hearing loss, it does put things into perspective. Always a pleasure to see you, take care and my best as always.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Wychic, so sorry about your niece, it is always sad when someone lose their hearing but even more so when it could have been prevented. Many parents believed that they were doing what was best for their children by not getting them vaccinated. Unfortunately, their decision have far reaching consequences, not only for their children but for others. Your mum sounds pretty awesome. Appreciate the visit and the insightful comment. Take care and my best to you.


wychic profile image

wychic 2 years ago from Sheridan, Wyoming

Awesome hub, thanks! My mom is a sign language interpreter, so it's safe to say that I've always been fairly aware of hearing issues and safe ear habits. However, it's really sad how many people don't know, or don't realize the long-term implications of certain actions. My niece is profoundly deaf because my sister used to be anti-vaccination. Niece got rubella and lost 95% hearing in one ear, 75% in the other. Totally preventable.


Midget38 2 years ago

I have hearing loss in one ear(profound) due to the brain tumor I had to remove. And it taught me one thing-not to take my good ear for granted! Sharing, Jo.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Devika, when readers like you say that my hub was useful, it makes it all worth while. I hope your son is ok, if you are concern about his hearing, it's a good idea to have his ears checked, children often get the odd ear problems, sometimes it looks like they are simply ignoring us, when they are actually having difficulties with their hearing. I hope you're all having a lovely Sunday, my best as always.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Frank, I won't tell anyone, but I'm well please to know that you learn from my hubs.:) always appreciated. Enjoy your weekend.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

MsDora, it's always lovely to see you. It's interesting that you are more auditory than visual. While most of us dare not think about the loss of sight, we do tend to take our ability to hear for granted, I would certainly hate to have to chose between my five senses, the human body is incredible. Thank you for stopping by and for the insightful comment. Take care and have a wonderful Sunday.


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Hi tobusiness yo covered all aspects here. Amazing, I should come across this hub I was just discussing with my son about the loss of hearing and to my surprise there it is. I now know more about hearing and so interestingly researched. You laid out the photos and explained to perfection. Voted up , interesting and useful. Take care.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

I don't like to admit it, but I learn a lot from your hubs just so you know Frank :)


MsDora profile image

MsDora 2 years ago from The Caribbean

Thank you for this great presentation on hearing and deafness. I am auditory more than visual so my hearing is super-important to me. This is quite lesson with useful diagrams. Voted Up and Useful.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Thank you fiza abro, much appreciated, my best to you.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Jackie, I'm so please you liked the hub, thanks for stopping by and for the insightful comment, Your temporary hearing problem as a child, was probably due to an enlarge adenoid which can block the tube that drains fluids from the ear to the back of the throat. Or possible, a build up of wax in the ear, what ever caused it, it's good that there were no lasting detrimental effect. Take care and my best to you.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

Just fantastic article; as always, and such heart warming videos. I had hearing problems as a child but it seemed to have cleared up on its own somehow. I had tests showing my hearing was impaired but nothing was done for me; but maybe it wasn't considered that bad. I will write down your remedies for the buzz in case anyone needs to try that. Herbal is the way to go whenever we can.

I loved how the music brought the man out; just amazing. Music is a very special sound for many. Certainly him!


fiza abro 2 years ago

Awesome


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Faith, I do sympathise with your sister, tinnitus can be very hard to live with, I started taking a combination of ginkgo, omega 3 krill oil and ginseng and I must say, I hardly notice the slight buzzing noise, unless it's very quiet. I hope your granddaughter will be ok, children often get the odd ear infection, it's always best to get this things thoroughly checked out at the earliest opportunity.

It's always a pleasure to see you, take care and enjoy the weekend, my best to you and the family.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Excellent article, dear Jo. You always cover every topic so well and all who read benefit from your insight and knowledge on the topic of your choice. We seem to suffer with Tinnitus in our family. Mine is very mild and I only notice it at night when all is quiet, just a bit of ringing, probably from the old rock-n-roll days of concert going. However, one of my sisters has it so bad that it interrupted her life and she finally, after so many years, found relief after going to a chiropractor who specialized in helping with the ear. That is interesting about hearing is the last sense to leave us when we die. I cannot imagine going through this life without hearing all of life's wonders and sounds, especially music or the laughter of a child. I will share this with my son as one of my granddaughters, we have noticed, seems to not be hearing when being spoken to, and I pray it is just what you have written here about wax buildup and not permanent from loud music or some medication. My husband's step-mother is deaf after giving birth way back when. However, now her adult son and daughter both have hearing loss. She is blessed with many grandchildren and I cannot imagine not hearing their sweet little voices ... well, they are about grown now.

Up and more and away

Blessings for a lovely long weekend


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Bill, it's so good to see my favourite teacher. :) I very much appreciate the visit and lovely comment.

I thought you and Bev would be out relaxing and communing with nature, but its good to see you. I hope you're having a great weekend, take care and my best to you both as always.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

If I ever have health questions I know who to turn to. You always make this complicated stuff seem so simple, and that is the mark of a good teacher. Thank you for this. Very informative and well-written.

Have a wonderful weekend my friend.

bill


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Ruby, lovely to see you! I must admit, the videos brought a tear to my eyes. The old man was just incredible, the human sprite, and the power of music never ceases to amaze . Thank you for stopping by, it's always a pleasure. Enjoy you weekend, I'll be heading off to work in little while, no rest for the wicked. :)


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K Author

Hi Carola, you've made a valid point about the term 'hearing impairment.' However, this term seems to be the most appropriate, since it covers a range of different degrees of hearing loss, no disrespect intended. I suffer from mild hearing loss, therefore my hearing is not pitch perfect, it is impaired. Thank you for pointing this out, and for reading and commenting, I do appreciate it.

My best to you.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

I watched both videos and was blown away. The child hearing for the first time was wonderful, but the old man listening to music lifted my spirit soooo high. Your article is informative and educational. I have a friend with partial hearing loss. Thank you Jo. Great hub.....


Carola Finch profile image

Carola Finch 2 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Very comprehensive article, however, you should know that many people with hearing loss (mostly deaf) object to the term "hearing impaired," for a variety ot reasons. I work in the disabled world and have spent many years in the deaf community.

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