Cystic Fibrosis Cause Finally Discovered

by Dr. Artour Rakhimov (www.NormalBreathing.com)

You may not know that lowered body oxygen content brings about many, if not all, chronic health conditions. Many of us can survive for approximately a month without having exercise and food, quite a few days with no water, but no longer than a few minutes with no air. It is commonly recognized that low body oxygenation results in chronic inflammation, cancer, suppressed immune system, allergies, angina pain and a great many other damaging health conditions and effects.

It has long been acknowledged so far that cystic fibrosis is caused by a faulty gene: CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). It leads to manufacture of abnormally viscous and sticky fluid, called mucus, in body organs. This mucus adds on in the respiration passages of the lungs and in the pancreas, the body organ that helps to digest food. This sticky mucus brings about dangerous lung infections and serious digestive complications. Cystic fibrosis will likely affect the sweat glands as well. (Even ancient yoga knew that salty and smelly perspiration relates to heavy and fast breathing at rest!)

New medical findings suggests that expression of the cystic fibrosis CFTR mutation gene is modulated, in a dose-dependent manner, by decreased oxygen content in the body. In other words, degree of abnormalities in mucus composition is controlled by oxygen concentrations in body cells. You can jump to this YouTube video that explains all these details about cystic fibrosis treatment: Cystic Fibrosis.

Recent medical discoveries

American scientists from the Department of Medicine in the University of Alabama (Birmingham) examined the impact of cellular oxygen amounts upon CFTR in vitro. The title of their article (published in the American Journal of Physiology and Cell Physiology) claims that Improved oxygenation promotes CFTR maturation and trafficking in MDCK monolayers (Bebök et al, 2001).

One more team of North American experts from Fleming James Cystic Fibrosis Research Center (also in the University of Alabama at Birmingham) investigated the Role of oxygen availability in CFTR expression and function (Guimbellot et al, 2008). In the abstract, they wrote, "... Environmental factors that induce hypoxic signaling regulate CFTR mRNA and epithelial Cl(-) transport in vitro and in vivo."

German scientists from the Hanover Medical High School also confirmed that hypoxia inducible factor-1 mediates repression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the intestinal tract (Zheng et al, 2009). They wrote, " ... In summary, our study clarifies CFTR regulation and introduces the concept of a HIF-1-orchestrated response designed to regulate ion and fluid movement across hypoxic intestinal epithelia".

Hence, all these studies claim that transport of ion and water through the mucosal surfaces is controlled by oxygen levels. If one has high oxygen levels in body cells, there are no problems with pumps that transfer ions and water. Low oxygen content worsens the work of the pumps. What are the possible causes of low oxygen levels in cells?

These medical research studies measured breathing rates in people with cystic fibrosis and discovered that all tested people are hypervetilators: they breathe about 2 times more air at rest than the medical norm. (Two links below provide exact references for these minute ventilation studies.)

As it has been found in hundreds of medical studies, breathing more air at rest brings less oxygen to cells due to spasm of blood vessels (caused by low CO2), suppressed Bohr effect, chest breathing, and mouth breathing.

Low CO2 can also promote injury to the lungs, as it happens in cystic fibrosis, COPD, severe asthma, and some other conditions. Then overbreathing will cause hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the arterial blood). The final effect for this scenario (hyperventilation with arterial hypercapnia and abnormal ventilation-perfusion ratio) is the same: low level of oxygen in cells.

Therefore, it is logical that restoration of normal breathing parameters naturally eliminates the cause and symptoms of this potentially deadly disease.

Here is the trailer of my Amazon Kindle Book Cystic Fibrosis: Defeated with Natural Self-Oxygenation Method.


Cystic Fibrosis Defeated: Kindle Book

Resources
Cystic Fibrosis and Hypoxia: Causes, Effects and Treatment - A large 34 pages article about all details related to causes, effects, and treatment of hypoxia in cystic fibrosis
CFTR Mutation Gene Is Triggered by Cell Hypoxia
Why People with Cystic Fibrosis Should Exercise With Strictly Nasal Breathing - Knol
Exercise and Cystic Fibrosis: With Nose Breathing Only - Article from Triond.com

Dr. Artour Rakhimov is a health educator, the author of books and the educational website www.NormalBreathing.com with hundreds of medical quotes, tables, graphs, charts, references, results of clinical trials, analysis of respiratory techniques, free breathing exercises, manuals, techniques, lifestyle modules and other resources for better cells oxygen content and health.

References

Bebök Z, Tousson A, Schwiebert LM, Venglarik CJ.
Improved oxygenation promotes CFTR maturation and trafficking in MDCK monolayers.
Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2001 Jan;280(1): C135-45.

Guimbellot JS, Fortenberry JA, Siegal GP, Moore B, Wen H, Venglarik C, Chen YF, Oparil S, Sorscher EJ, Hong JS.
Role of oxygen availability in CFTR expression and function.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2008 Nov;39(5): 514-21.

Zheng W, Kuhlicke J, Jäckel K, Eltzschig HK, Singh A, Sjöblom M, Riederer B, Weinhold C, Seidler U, Colgan SP, Karhausen J.
Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-mediated repression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the intestinal epithelium.
FASEB J. 2009 Jan;23(1): 204-13.

More by this Author


Comments 1 comment

artour profile image

artour 4 years ago from Canada Author

Sure. If you know anyone with CF, spread a good news.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working