Smoking Accelerates Aging

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How Smoking Affects the Body



Smoking not only causes deadly diseases, it has a huge effect on our bodies as well in terms of the aging process. It does affect the skin, teeth, hair, eyes, heart, bones, lungs, and adds years to our appearance.

I remember a very wise woman saying to me as a child, "Susan, you have such pretty skin ... please don't ever smoke or that pretty skin will be no more. You'll end up with alligator skin just like your aunt."

My aunt who not only smoked but also worked for Macdonalds Tobacco Company in Montreal didn't really have alligator skin at all but she did have leathery skin as I recall.

Hair Loss

As people age their hair tends to thin and some people may even go bald. This process of aging tends to accelerate for people that smoke.

Smoking can also cause premature graying of the hair.

Smoking and Skin Aging

  • When you smoke your skin is deprived of oxygen and nutrients.
  • Someone that smokes for ten years is more prone to end up with deep wrinkles and dry leathery skin opposed to someone that has never smoked.
  • Crow's feet around the eyes may develop earlier and can be deeper for someone that smokes.
  • Lines around the lips (called smokers pucker) will usually been seen on someone that smokes. This is caused from the sucking action needed to take in and inhale a cigarette.
  • Smokers tend to develop age spots far quicker than a non-smoker.
  • Smokers tend to have a poor tone to their skin and can have uneven coloring. If you are a smoker your skin tone will improve over time once you quit.
  • There are thousands of chemicals in tobacco, and a lot of these chemicals have a destructive effect on the collagen and elastin, which in turn causes sagging skin.

How Smoking Accelerates Aging and the Eyes

By the time some people reach the age of 75 they will have developed or started to develop cataracts. This is a film that covers the eye lens. Smoking can accelerate the development of cataracts.

How Smoking Can Affect the Mouth and Teeth

Smoking not only causes bad breath and the yellow staining, but may also do the following:

Gum disease, which in turn can cause the loss of teeth. Studies have shown that smokers are twice as likely to lose their teeth compared to non-smokers.


Reasons not to start smoking or to quit.

Bones can become brittle or weakened, and people that smoke may develop osteoporosis sooner than a non-smoker.

Insomnia can be due to smoking. Sleep is needed to feel and stay young.

Radiation is released from smoking, which in turn causes aging.

For women that smoke menopause can come earlier.

Some men experience erectile dysfunction from smoking.

People that are around smokers can be harmed from secondhand smoke.

Smoking accelerates cell aging.

Energy is highly depleted from smoking.



Smoking and Aging Effects to the Heart

Blood clots are formed easier when you smoke as smoking can cause high blood pressure. When someone smokes their arteries narrow over time making it harder for the blood to get to the heart. When you take both of these and add them together it equals increased odds for a heart attack.

Why Quit Smoking?

Everyone knows that smoking causes lung cancer but if you quit within 72 hours your lung capacity increases and breathing becomes much easier. After 3 months the lungs function will increase by up to thirty percent.

One year after quitting any risk of a heart attack caused by smoking is half of what it was when you smoked.

Quit for ten years and the risk of lung cancer is cut in half.

Fifteen years after quitting and the risk of dying from a heart attack is the same as someone who's never smoked.


Disclaimer

Just Ask Susan is not a health care professional in any capacity. Everything in this article was found through researching how smoking can accelerate aging. Please consult a medical professional or your family practitioner for further information.

If you'd like to read more hubs by this author please click on the link and visit her profile page.
If you'd like to read more hubs by this author please click on the link and visit her profile page. | Source

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Comments 64 comments

Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

cosmomed, I think we're starting to see less smokers in the films and who knows maybe as time goes on no one will be smoking on screen.


cosmomed profile image

cosmomed 3 years ago from Sarawak. Malaysia

Smoking is definitely not good for health but I always see Hollywood actors smoke in films. Lolz


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Kasman, It's a very hard addiction to break. I know a few people too that smoke while on oxygen and it makes me shake my head, but at the same time I understand how much of hold smoking can have on you. I do hope that your mother will be able to kick the habit and soon.

Thanks for stopping by, for voting, and for commenting.


Kasman profile image

Kasman 3 years ago from Bartlett, Tennessee

Hi Susan, this hub in particular hits me really close to home. I've lost a grandmother and a great grandmother to this horrible addiction....my mother currently smokes which is also weighing heavily on my mind as of late. I had to watch my grandmothers deteriorate and I also helped to take care of both of them for a few years so I know the affects.....I remember a few times, while my grandmother was on an oxygen machine at her house, she actually came close to blowing herself up with these horrible things because she still had a secret stash.

I'm definitely voting this up and sharing because it's got a lot of truth to it. Great job presenting it!


PADDYBOY60 profile image

PADDYBOY60 3 years ago from Centreville Michigan

Thank you ma'am.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Hi Paddy, Wish I'd never had started smoking when I was a teenager either. But way back when it was socially acceptable and the in thing to do. Thanks for stopping by and sorry to hear smoking caused you COPD.


PADDYBOY60 profile image

PADDYBOY60 3 years ago from Centreville Michigan

Howdy ma'am

I wish I wouldn't have started. I quit about 18 years ago but I still ended up getting COPD. It is not fun fighting for air. Thank you for sharing this info. Maybe someone will read it and heed it.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

No Judi, Sadly it sure doesn't.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

GoodLady, I wish I had quit when I was 18. Hopefully your son and his girlfriend will quit soon.


Judi Bee profile image

Judi Bee 4 years ago from UK

Smoking really doesn't have a lot going for it, does it - sad that so many young people still take up a habit that can make them ill and ugly.


GoodLady profile image

GoodLady 4 years ago from Rome, Italy

Glad you quit. Wish my eldest son and his girlfriend manage to give it up; they tried once butt they're both smoking again. I managed to give up when I was 18 when my regular doctor told me I was a fool! I felt it and somehow it jarrred me into stopping.

Useful hub, voting!


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

KDu, Thanks so much and now I'm off to read your hub .... sounds interesting.


KDuBarry03 4 years ago

I am definitely linking this to my article "Sleep Disorders: Shift Work and Insomnia" because the information is great and useful. Thanks for the great tips!


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

SS, Thanks. I have a few of the aging signs due to smoking and hopefully some of them fade with time.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA

These are really scary facts. And I do know it all, but it's so hard to quit. I am so proud of you SZ for doing it. You are definitely an inspiration.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

B. Leekley, Thank you so much.

Never start smoking is the best advise anyone can give. I wish I'd have listened to that back when I was a teenager. Now that I've quit I'll be needing to go on a diet shortly :)


B. Leekley profile image

B. Leekley 4 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

Up, Useful, Interesting, and shared with followers and on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Google+.

My advice to those who have tried to quit and failed is to quit again and to keep quitting. In my case, when I had long been a pack and a half a day smoker back in the mid 70s, I quit -- trying every technique I could find -- and failed many times before I got tired of quitting and just quit. Until you get there (and no guarantee that day will come), by quitting again each time you start smoking again, you are meanwhile training yourself to quit, smoking less, and to some extent weaning your body of nicotine.

I say "just quit", but it was not easy. I've read that nicotine is more addictive than heroin. I did not like the waste of money, the sore throat, the self-destruction, or the dependence, but I kept going back to smoking for the relief from nicotine craving throughout my body. I was a bachelor then and unattached, and when I decided it was time to put quitting smoking ahead of anything else, I moved to a city where no one knew me, rented a room, got a no-think push a button job in a factory, and did not smoke. No matter what else I did, the main thing I was doing was not smoking. That I had learned Transcendental Meditation helped a lot, especially in getting through that first day. For the first 30 or 40 days or so, my mind was mush, like a caterpillar in its cocoon. At home my mind could not take heavier reading than comic books and P. G. Wodehouse novels. To simulate sucking a cigarette, I found lots of things to suck, nibble, or sip. I sucked my thumb, my knuckles, big pretzel sticks, peppermint sticks, etc. I nibbled raw carrots and celery. I shelled sunflower seeds with my front teeth. I gnawed real, woody licorice sticks. I sipped glasses of water and of unsweetened grapefruit juice. And so on. Each day and each minute I persisted in my determination to not smoke. Finally after over a month my mind started coming back, and I increasingly was able to turn my attention to getting my life in order and set in a positive direction. For the next several years I had to chew gum constantly. I never smoked again, except in my dreams, and to my awareness I have not done that for years.

Keep quitting. Do what it takes to quit for good. If you start again, quit again.

Best idea: Never start using any nicotine product. It's disgusting, self-destructive, an expensive waste of money, and senseless. Instead take deep breaths of fresh air.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Ldeer, Thank you for reading and for your comments.


Ldeer profile image

Ldeer 4 years ago from Vancouver, BC

What an informative read. Thanks for the wake up.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

drbj, When I was a teen I always wanted to look 19. All the adults were right back then when they said, "Stop wanting to look older than your age, you'll get there soon enough."


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Gypsy, I too have noticed that it does age women more so. Thanks for the votes!


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

You are on the mark with this hub, Susan. Smoking very definitely accelerates aging and it would not be a bad idea to print somewhere on the pack, this product will make you look older than you are.

On the other hand, youngsters might find that a positive.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

sholland, It didn't take much for me to start smoking after quitting for a year. I think what bothered me the most was the disappointment I felt with myself. Most people that knew me said, "You quit once, you can do do it again."

Anyways, thanks for stopping by to read, comment and for the votes.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Paula, I can't imagine ever becoming one of those smug, self-righteous , FORMER smokers who continually nags, insults and bitches at people who still smoke. I don't judge people. I do make my son smoke in the garage now though instead of in the house :) . I wrote this hub in hopes to make people aware of how smoking can accelerate aging, not for any other reason than that.


Gypsy48 profile image

Gypsy48 4 years ago

Excellent article Susan. I am glad I never took up that habit. Mine seems to be chocolate! I've noticed that smoking seems to age women more so than men. Great read, voted up and awesome:)


sholland10 profile image

sholland10 4 years ago from Southwest Missouri

Well, drats! I knew I would read this and know you were right!! Yep, I need to quit. I do love it, though. I did quit for 3 years one time. Then my friend and I went on a trip together. Needless to say, I started again. I used to be able to pick them up and put them down. No more. It will be a long road.

@Paula, I have noticed since I started again that more of my smoking relatives have been disappointed that I didn't kick the habit than any of my non-smoking friends. I am "the baby" of a smoking family and caught hell from the time I started. When I quit for 3 years, it never bothered me to be around it. It was peer pressure (LOL) that caused me to go back to it (we really had a great time on that trip!). Anyway, Susan has written the truth and doesn't seem to be "snooting" any of us who still smoke. I need to quit. Most of us know that, and I admire anyone who does. But it is a personal choice. Maybe I'll make it again someday. LOL

Back to you, Susan, you did an excellent job of giving information about the facts. Votes and shares! :-)


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Joseph, That's great that you've never smoked. Thanks for reading, commenting, and for voting and sharing.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

b. Malin, I've know so many people that have lost their lives due to smoking and it is so sad. Like any addiction it is hard to quit.

Thank you for your comments.


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Susan...I happen to think of one bit of advice that I'd like to pass on to you. I have many friends who have quit. Oddly enough, people who have NEVER taken up this ugly habit, don't feel compelled to "comment or preach" to a smoker. They will usually just avoid them when they're smoking.

HOWEVER, I have come to learn that there is NOTHING worse than a reformed-smoker-friend. They're worse than BORN AGAIN CHRISTIANS, who have discovered GOD for the first time.

Please....whatever you do....do NOT become one of those smug, self-righteous , FORMER smokers who continually nags, insults and bitches at people who still smoke. I have one friend in particular who was a HEAVY smoker for YEARS.....a hard core habit beyond anyone I know.......now, she's like the virgin Mary and she's pisses off every smoker in sight. That's just not good, no matter how you look at it.

"You quit, OK, fine...congratulations....I'm happy for you.....Now, shut the eff up, or we'll start pointing out your NEW bad habits!!!"

Know what I mean? When I was a non-smoker, I never said a word to anyone about their smoking.......EVERYONE has a bad habit or 2....it's a plain old human condition. Better you refuse to associate with a smoker, than berate and scold them. That's all.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Wayne, I agree it is a mind set. When determined enough that you really want something and go for it, such as to quit smoking, chances are greater that you'll succeed. On the other hand if you were to hand me a lit cigarette while you ran into the store for a minute, I'd find it very difficult not to sneak a drag. Not that you'd ever do that to me though :)


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago

Excellent hub! Actually I've never smoked, just once for 30 seconds at 14. No wonder we still look a little younger. Sharing and voting this up!


b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 4 years ago

Having never gotten into the Habit...oh sure, tried it once or twice in High School and didn't like it, I feel blessed that I didn't. Most people that smoke do become addicted, which is a Sad fact of life. I'm sure it shortened my own Father's life.

Excellent Hub and Video on this Subject Susan.


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 4 years ago from Texas

It is amazing to me that smoking is still as popular as it is globally and for such a mirade of different reasons....all some subset of addiction in the end. I am a reformed smoker having quite 30+ years ago but I am always amazed at friends who quit and fail. I finally realized that the key to successful quitting is the "desire to quit". Many folks quit but still have the mindset to smoke....it is a mental thing as much as it is a physical addiction and, as you point so wonderfully here, it comes with many, many bad effects. Thanks for sharing! ~WB


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Kelly, We've had advertising on our cigarette packs here in Canada for awhile now as well as the TV commercials and both are pretty scary.

Thanks for your comments and hopefully your father will quit one day soon.

Nice to meet you.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Hi Frank, Thanks :)


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Sue, I didn't the like the first cigarette I smoked either and can remember coughing, but all my friends were smoking and well .... I wanted to be one of the cool kids too. Sorry to read that your father had emphysema. That must have been hard you and your family to see him go through that.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Mama Kim, No more smoking in my house .... and it smells so much better :)

Ruby, I've watched a few video's on various people trying to get teens to quit smoking by showing them what they'll look like if they keep smoking. I should add one of the video's onto this hub. Thank you for reading and for your comments.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Gordon, While doing research for this hub I learned a few things too. I started smoking when I was 13 and smoked up until three months ago. I quit for one year and started back up again. That's a lot of years. I only wish that before I started more was know about the dangers of smoking.

Thank you so much for stopping by to read this and for all your comments.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Ardie, There are no dumb reasons to quit! Congrats that you did quit and I only wish I would have at 31.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Martie, Maybe someday it will be a world where there are no cigarettes, but I don't think I'll be around when and if it happens. In the 80's I recall being in the hospital and still being allowed to smoke in my own room. Thinking back I shake my head, as it is so hard to believe it was ever like that.

Thank you for reading, your comments, sharing and pinning.


KellyMediaBest profile image

KellyMediaBest 4 years ago from Tampa, Florida

In Florida they have startling and intense commercials for Tobacco Free Florida that relay many statistics, as well as show graphic images of people who have been debilitated because of smoking. It scares me and makes me sad because my father has smoke for so long, and I wish he would just quit. Smoking cigarettes is one of the worst things you can do to your body. Thanks for reiterating the affects not only on your health but your looks. Maybe that will convince some people.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Thanks Paula :)


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Cardisa, Most of my family members smoked too. When I started smoking it was the in thing to do. There were commercials on TV promoting smoking, billboards, magazine ads, all totally opposite of what we see today. Glad to hear that you've never smoked.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

PaisleeGal, That is great that you quit 32 years ago. I wish I would have. My dad smoked 3 packs a day and he quit shortly after retiring because he could no longer afford the habit. Each day that goes by it does get a little easier. Thanks so much for reading and for your comments.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 4 years ago from Shelton

what a good share and I agree with Billybuc it is sobering.. look at me I'm only 18 and since I started smoking cigers I look like my father..:( LOL kidding about the 18.. but yeah smoking did age me.. so did years...:) you always have interesting hubs I enjoy the read..


Sueswan 4 years ago

Hi Susan,

I tried smoking when I was a teenager but didn't like it. My father started smoking when he was eight years old and died at the age of 68 from emphysema.

I am glad that you have not given up on your goal to quit smoking. I know you will be successful.

Voted up and awesome and sharing

Take care :)


always exploring profile image

always exploring 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

It is a known fact that smoking ages the skin. If only the young people would know this. Great hub..Smiles through wrinkles..Ha


Mama Kim 8 profile image

Mama Kim 8 4 years ago

My smoking friends and family think I'm too strict in not allowing smoke in or near my house... Well I'll just let them read this! HA! ^_^ Thank you for such a fantastic hub! Voting up and sharing!


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

RH, I know I've said this to you before ..... You'll quit when the time is right and when you're ready to.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

Hi, Susan.

Well, what a wonderfully informative Hub. Every sentence contains very valuable information and as a smoker, there was some of it I have heard before but surprisingly I learned a great deal as well. For example, I didn't know that smoking caused hair loss (I started going bald in my early twenties) nor that it affected sleep patterns (I am the definitive insomniac).

I have been smoking since I was 11 (now 43) and although I did stop for almost a year some years back, it was torture and I suppose I knew I would always go back to smoking. The problem I have is that I enjoy it so much and I have now accepted it is a part of my life. I know I will never quit, irrespective of the known outcome and the fact that both my grandfathers died in their fifties of lung cancer (almost certainly caused by smoking).

One very important point is that whenever I am asked what is the biggest regret of my life, I don't have to think about my answer. It is starting smoking. I really hope some youngsters reading your page do take note and realise just what a killer it is and how addictive it is - before it is too late and they are hooked for life.


Ardie profile image

Ardie 4 years ago from Neverland

Hi Susan :) I quit smoking...let's see... It will be 3 years in December. I quit for the dumbest reasons too - but the health benefits are nice perks. I quit because of the cost and because I was 31 and noticing the signs of aging. I knew smoking was hurrying me along in that sense so I quit asap! I hope more people find the motivation to quit smoking - whether its to look better, for the financial gains, or for the health benefits. Now that I dont smoke anymore I realize just how nasty of a habit it was.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Conservative Lady, I'm so sorry to read this about your mother. Thank you so much for your comments and I wish your mom all the best.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa

I wonder how long will it take for cigarettes to go down in history like snuffing and chewing tobacco went down? And to think a medical encyclopedia published in 1970 declared smoking tobacco as 'not dangerous' though it stains fingers and teeth. While the death of Queen Elizabeth II's father, George VI, should have been an eye-opener to scientists investigating the danger of tobacco.

Perfect hub about smoking as an accelerator of aging. Shared and pinned in my personal library.


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Good luck...more power to you and I applaud you. I quit for 14 months. DON'T ASK!!


Cardisa profile image

Cardisa 4 years ago from Jamaica

I am sure glad I don't smoke. My mom, dad, maternal grandparents and my mom's three sons all smoked. Of all these smokers one of my brothers is the only one that hasn't quit. My grandmother quit before she died but my father's organs shut down and he died when I was 8.

Thanks for a lesson on smoking and it's effects on our bodies.


PaisleeGal profile image

PaisleeGal 4 years ago from Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Good article, well done. I am one of the lucky former smokers. I quit more than 32 years ago after being almost 2 pack a day smoker for 12 years. It was not easy to stop but after the first year or so I never had a desire to pick them back up. And I was surrounded by many family who where smokers. I wanted to share this to let all you new quitters know it can be done. Hang on it will get better!!!


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Paula, When I first started smoking back when I was a teenager it was in the days where you could still smoke in Hospitals, Grocery Stores, and on school grounds. I think the only place people didn't smoke was in church. If we only knew back then what we know now. The cigarette packs here in Canada are pretty bad with pictures of what tongue cancer looks like and other various cancers. I've quit countless times too but only twice where I've been able to go for more than a couple of days without a smoke. Hopefully this time will be the last time .... I'm determined not to every smoke again but I was every time I quit.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

Susan - I know! I know! I need to quit...I am working on that...! Reading this makes me want to quit right now.


Conservative Lady profile image

Conservative Lady 4 years ago from Surprise Arizona - formerly resided in Washington State

Very useful Hub. My 76 year old mother in law is living with us while she is battling lung Cancer that has spread to her colon and brain. She was a smoker for 30 years then she quit but a couple months after she quit she learned she had lung cancer. I would highly encourage anyone who smokes to stop - approximately 95% of lung cancer is caused from being a smoker - so many people could be spared this horrible disease if they didn't smoke. Thank you for sharing this important message. Voted Up and Useful/Interesting


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Smoking has an endless list of nasty traits...it causes multiple health issues. It's expensive and unattractive.....smelly and disgusting.....It's detrimental to the body from head to toe....People who still smoke today, are treated like criminals.....idiots.....disease carriers.....there are commercials about this filthy habit, Drs tell of the dangers...the PACK itself has a warning on it.....Non-smokers won't be around you but give you dirty looks and often crude remarks......It's BAD BAD BAD......It is also so incredibly addicting, it's more difficult to kick than a 30-year hard core drug addiction.....I know, I've quit at least 6 times! ......Very good Susan.....Congrats on being a quitter! ...UP++


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Chuck, I know how hard it is to quit. The first time I quit with any success it lasted for a year and then I started again. This past June I quit again and so far so good. I still have rough days but I'm determined not to start again. I've been using Nicorette gum and find that I need to start weening myself off of the gum soon. I hope that you're able to quit soon. Please let me know how it goes when you do take the plunge.


chuckd7138 profile image

chuckd7138 4 years ago from Virginia Beach, VA

I'm a 41yo smoker that has been smoking for over 24 years. I have tried quitting many, many times in every way imaginable (patch, gum, lozenges, snus, tapering, cold turkey and even a combination of these). I've even quit long enough to have the smell of smoke disgust me. However, I just cannot give up the combination of nicotine with the hand-mouth movement. This is why I am looking into e-cigarettes. I'm just doing my research right now, but hopefully, I can go from smoking to vaping, because even my roommate (a "breather") will buy me a pack of smokes when I can't afford them because she can't handle my nicotine fits. .... Great article though, Susan. It is very informative and well-written.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada Author

Bill, Thanks so much. I only wish I had never smoked. Also wish I would have quit long before I did.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

Very sobering information and a must read for any smoker....of for that matter, any teenager! Well done Susan!

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