Does your countertop water filter out dangerous bacteria like salmonella, cryptosporidium and e-coli

If you're someone who cares about your health, you should pay close attention to what's in the water you drink. Water is one of the most important factors in living a long, healthy life, and can help you avoid disease and other physical problems. You can substitute for it by taking vitamins, or even by eating well. Anyone who's concerned about being healthy should look for pure, drinkable water. However, it can be harder to do this than it might seem. Some people use bottled water. Others choose a countertop water filter system.

Much of our tap water is contaminated by various substances, including heavy metals and dangerous bacteria like cryptosporidium, e-coli, and salmonella. Many conventional water filters don't take these substances out of the water, although they remove strong tasting minerals and chlorine to a greater or lesser degree. That means that while your filtered water tastes better, it's not actually healthy for you.

You might think that bottled water would be better, since it's theoretically filtered. However, a lot of bottled water comes from the municipal water system of other areas of the country, and is minimally filtered before being placed in the bottles. Add to this the cost of bottled water, the amount of water wasted in the filtering and bottling process, and the amount of non-biodegradable plastic garbage produced, and you'll quickly see that using primarily bottled water isn't a good option, either. The best option is to choose a countertop water filter that does the job right.

The best countertop water filter systems are made by companies like Berkey. When shopping for a filter that will remove all contaminants, including harmful bacteria, look for a gravity fed filter that requires no extra power. These filters last for years, and keep doing their job well. They remove up to 99.9 percent of all contaminants from your water, including metals, minerals, bacteria, and chemicals. For about three hundred dollars, you can have a countertop water filter that will last for years, providing inexpensive, healthy drinking water. After purchase, your operating costs should be nonexistent.

You can keep cleaning the durable filters inside a high end countertop water filter system for a long time. Just scrub them clean. There should be an effective antimicrobial substance inside each filter that keeps bacteria from breeding in the system. You can even use a countertop water filter in emergency situations, where the water wouldn't ordinarily be drinkable. In case of power outages, floods, and other serious problems, you'll know that the water you're drinking is safe and healthy to consume. When you're worrying about other things, peace of mind about your health is good to have. Anyone who's concerned about how drinking water can affect their body should investigate their options in high quality countertop water filters. You'll be glad you did.

Comments 3 comments

beths nutrition 8 years ago

Great point about cleaning the filters. Obviously you don't want bacteria and other baddies growing in the very thing that's supposed to protect you.

Most water filters I know, unfortunately, do little more than help with the taste of the water. Which is good if your local water is entirely pure but has a bad flavor. However they're no good at keeping out bacteria or heavy metals or even protecting you from bacterial growing within them.

Not too useful in the long run. If I'm going to invest in a water filter I want it to be a good enough one that I know I can trust it with more than flavor. I don't want to worry about my health.

It's a particularly great idea to hae one that works even when there's no power or general water service. I've heard that gravitational filters are perfect for that.


scott bradley 7 years ago

Hi! Nice Hub! Good info as well. I just wanted to help by mentioning that cryptosporidium are not bacteria. Also, after personally testing more than 65000 samples for Total Coliform bacteria, i can tell you for sure that most water (in the US, at least) does not contain salmonella, E, coli, or Cryptosporidium.

Bacteris and pathogens are not filtered out of water, generally, but the water is usually disinfected via chlorination, ultraviolet sterilization, or ozonation.

I hope this has been helpful for you. Keep writing fun and informative HUBS!


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almasi 5 years ago

Thanks for a useful hub.

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