How To Make Apple Cider Vinegar At Home

Make Apple Cider Vinegar At Home

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How to make apple cider vinegar from apples

Apple cider vinegar offers many health benefits, which is why many people have asked me the recipe for making ACV.

Making apple cider vinegar at home can be complex, and there are many recipes which are difficult to follow.

Here, I will share a very simple method for making apple cider vinegar at home with easily available ingredients.

Read My Book

Magical Apple Cider Vinegar: Ultimate Guide to Weight Loss, Hair Growth and Glowing Skin

This is a simple recipe, and easy to follow. Anyone can make apple cider vinegar at home.

If you are not sure about why you should bother about apple cider vinegar, please read my other articles about benefits of apple cider vinegar.

In short, apple cider vinegar is very effective in detox, digestion, hair fall, skin care and overall well-being. ACV is even useful for the health of your pets.

But the most popular use of apple cider vinegar is for weight loss.

Making ACV At Home

Cook Time

Prep time: 30 min Ready in: 30 min Yields: 1 litre

Ingredients

  • 8 to 10 apples, preferably organic
  • 1 to 3 teaspoons organic sugar or honey, optional
  • 1 litre water, preferably filtered
  • 1 jar
  • 1 paper towel or cloth

Method

Make apple cider vinegar at home

  1. Take the cores and peels of organic apples. It is important to pick up organic apples so that you get the full benefits of apple cider vinegar. You don't have to specifically peel apples to make apple cider vinegar at home. Plan making cider vinegar at home at a time when you are looking to use apples for other things like making apple juice, or making muffins or fruit salad. Find a big jar and put all the peels and cores of organic apple in it.
  2. Add water to the jar. You can add some honey or organic sugar if you wish, but it is optional. You can make apple cider vinegar without honey or sugar. It's a personal choice. Stir the water so that the contents mix well. Now cover the jar with either a cotton cloth or paper towel and put a rubber band around it.
  3. Store the bottle in a cool and dry place. Allow it to sit for about two to three weeks, so that fermentation takes place. Now find a strainer, and strain out the liquid in another jar. You can discard the peels and scrap now. (You can use the solids as a compost for your plants. That's the beauty of natural remedies - everything is usable and nothing needs to be discarded.) You should cover the jar with paper towel or cloth once again. Now let the liquid rest for a month. During this month-long storage, visit the jar every day and give it a nice stir. THIS IS IMPORTANT. While making apple cider vinegar at home is easy, remembering to stir it every day is difficult.
  4. Please set up an alarm on your phone so that you are reminded to stir it regularly. Keep the jar where you can see it everyday so you will remember. Alternatively, attach the job of stirring to some other activity you do daily, like making coffee. So when you visit kitchen for coffee, give apple cider vinegar a stir. Don't overdo it. Once a day is enough. If you disturb the liquid too often, it may affect its quality.
  5. After letting it sit for one month and stirring it daily, your apple cider vinegar is ready. Taste it to see how it feels. By now, it would have achieved the required acidity. If not, then leave it for another week, and taste it again. If it still doesn't have the consistency you want, wait for another week. The level of acidity will depend on environmental factors.
  6. Once you are satisfied with the taste, your apple cider vinegar is ready to drink. Now, transfer the cider vinegar in a new jar and cover it with proper lid.
  7. Your apple cider vinegar is ready. Store it in a cool, dry place. No need to refrigerate. Because apples are already gone through fermentation process, you can store apple cider vinegar for as long as you wish.

How to make apple cider vinegar drink

Shake bottle well so that mother of vinegar gets mixed well.

Now take one to three teaspoons of apple cider vinegar and mix it with one cup (200ml) of lukewarm water. Stir well. Your apple cider vinegar drink is ready. Enjoy.

Some people like to make apple cider vinegar and honey drink. Simply add one teaspoon of honey to apple cider vinegar drink made as per above instructions.

Honey offers many health benefits, and by adding honey to your apple cider vinegar, you are making your ACV drink healthier.

Many people take one litre bottle of water and put a few teaspoons of apple cider vinegar, so that they can carry apple cider vinegar drink with them, and drink it throughout the day.

How to make apple cider vinegar with mother taste good

Apple cider vinegar may taste a bit odd for the first time. However, people get used to it over time.

If you don't like the taste of apple cider vinegar drink, add some honey to it.

Many people also add it to their regular drink - coffee, tea, orange juice etc. I prefer to drink it with water and honey. Other drinks contain caffeine and sugar, which may slow down your weight-loss process.


Best way to make apple cider vinegar is from organic apples

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How to make apple cider vinegar from apple juice

For some people, it may be more convenient to use apple juice to make apple cider vinegar.

This is possible, however the best way to make apple cider vinegar at home is from the peels as described in the recipe above.

For making apple cider vinegar from apple juice, follow the steps below:

  1. Take organic apples. Don't peel them. Just wash them well.
  2. Put about six to eight organic apples in a juicer, and take the juice.
  3. Now transfer the juice to a jar. Put paper towel or cloth on it and store it for fermentation
  4. Let it ferment as per the instructions given in the recipe above. Follow same recipe above for making apple cider vinegar from apple juice.

Remember that the fermentation maybe slower than if you were using apple peels.


Tips for making apple cider vinegar at home

  1. Always store apple cider vinegar jar away from direct sunlight - while making it as well as while storing it.
  2. One you have made apple cider vinegar, heat it once before storing it. This will improve the shelf life of apple cider vinegar.
  3. Use glass container for making as well as storing apple cider vinegar. Always avoid metal container. Preferably avoid plastic container too. High acidic content can react with metal or plastic.
  4. Always shake the jar before making apple cider vinegar drink, so that the mother of ACV mixes in your drink
  5. Add a bit of honey to your ACV drink to improve its taste.
  6. While making apple cider vinegar at home, Ddon't forget to stir ACV daily. This will help oxygen to mix with the liquid and boost the fermentation process.
  7. When making ACV, clean your hands before touching the jar. You don't want bad bacteria and germs to disturb the fermentation process. Use clean spoon to stir.
  8. The best temperature for making apple cider vinegar from scratch at home is between 60 degree Fahrenheit to 80 degree Fahrenheit.

How to make apple cider vinegar with mother

The mother of apple cider vinegar is where the health benefits of apple cider vinegar are stored.

The "mother" contains enzymes and good bacteria that help in losing weight, improving metabolism, stopping hair fall and so on.

If you follow the process for making apple cider vinegar at home described in this article, you will have apple cider vinegar with mother at the bottom of the jar. It is the grainy, muddy substance.

Shake the jar well before making an apple cider vinegar drink so that the mother of ACV mixes well.

Have you made apple cider vinegar at home?

Many people have tried making apple cider vinegar at home.

If you have tried to make ACV, please share your experience in the comments section below.

Your useful tips for making apple cider vinegar will be very helpful to others.

Calories in Apple Cider Vinegar

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1 tbsp
Calories 1
Calories from Fat0
% Daily Value *
Fat 0 g
Saturated fat 0 g
Unsaturated fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 0 g
Sugar 0 g
Fiber 0 g
Protein 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 0 mg
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

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Comments 20 comments

101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 2 years ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

I have said this in the article above, but it is worth repeating. While making apple cider vinegar at home, you must use organic apples. Also, you must stir it once a day, every day, so that apple cider vinegar ferments well. If you have tried to make apple cider vinegar at home, share your experience in the comments section.


Anabel 2 years ago

Hi. I tried making ACV at home and after about a week of having the apple remains steep in the water, they started to rise to the top and started molding as well. I wanted to know if it is ok to go on or if there is something wrong with the process and I should throw it out. The color also looks somewhat off. It has a sort of cloudy pale green color. Is that because I used green apples or it will get darker as it ferments further?


101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 2 years ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

Hi Anabel, I probably wouldn't continue if the fruit begins to float and gets rotten in the process.

There are two solutions:

Before you put peeled/sliced apple in water, cook the fruit lightly in water. This will remove excess air for the fruit and stop it from floating on top. Don't overcook.

Alternatively, you may stuff in a lot of slices together, so that they won't float. taking a narrow jar, with even narrower neck, for this will be helpful. Keep it in the narrow jar for a week, and then transfer it to a broad jar.

Use less honey initially. The sugar content could be making the fruit float. You can add more honey after completion of first week's fermentation.


Monica 2 years ago

Hi,

You have mentioned : Tips for making apple cider vinegar at home

2.One you have made apple cider vinegar, heat it once before storing it. This will improve the shelf life of apple cider vinegar.

Would this not affect the mother? Would you be able to suggest the temperature and the time for how long should the ACV be heated before it can be stored.?


101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 2 years ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

Hi Monica, you are right. Heating the ACV will affect the mother, and that's the trade-off for making ACV last longer. In my case, I don't heat ACV as I don't wish to weaken the mother. I know that I will consume the ACV in less than a year, so preserving it over a long time is not my concern.

If you still wish to heat it, then bring it to rapid boil, and then switch off heating. Let it cool, and then transfer it to a jar. Hope this helps.


Monica 2 years ago

Hi,

I have tried making ACV at home in two batches, however I am unable to obtain the mother (thick film) which is formed on top. I do see the small particulars at the bottom of the jar. the first bottle of ACV was prepared about 45 days back but how to do get the mother (thick film on top of ACV)? Should I let it remain for a few more month until the small particular turn dark? Please suggest.


101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 2 years ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

Hi Monica, you are right. The 'mother' will develop with time. When I made my ACV, it was almost clear liquid for the first 6 to 8 weeks it took to make ACV. After that, I sat there for another month or so, which is when I began to see the mother. Making ACV at home is very tricky, because we have to rely on natural fermentation and oxidation. Because of this, these days, I use home-made ACV for external application. For drinking, I buy organic ACV from Amazon.


Justwondrin 2 years ago

Instead of using a cloth over the jar, it might be better to use a lid with an airlock. All the gases will be allowed to exit the jar, but no new air will enter. I use these for making homemade sauerkraut, and they're great. They make these for regular and wide mouth glass jars and can be found online or at stores that have an extensive line of canning products.

We also make wine at home, and the airlock system is the only way to go. Making wine is similar to making vinegar - if the right conditions aren't there, your wine will be vinegar instead LOL! The vintners say that's called making salad dressing.

Can't wait to make the cider vinegar!


101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 2 years ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

Hi Justwondrin, thank you for your suggestion. You have a valid point. I recommended the use of cloth because it is easily available. Canning jar would be better to handle as well as safer, as it will reduce the risk of 'vinegar eel' forming too. You are right, it is tricky to make wine without the risk of making vinegar. Which, I think, is every winemaker's nightmare. As one winemaker famously said: "God wants us to make vinegar, and we have to do everything to stop Him." LOL!


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

Thanks for sharing this. I might try to make apple cider with your recipe. Have a nice day!


Adoy 2 years ago

I started the ACV process using 7 whole apples. Mistake was instead of cutting just in quarter each, I cut into about 8 pieces per apple. Problem with that was that some of the apples on top were floating. I covered with a cheesecloth and used a rubber band to keep in place. It's going to 2 weeks now, and when I checked it out some of the apples especially those floating have turned real brown. No moulds though and it sure smells okay and tastes slightly ferments. Seeing some turned brown, I thought it was probably because they were floating. So, I've transferred into a narrower glass jar and I made sure nothing is sticking out now. Do you think I'll still have the real thing?


101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 2 years ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

Hi Adoy, I had the same thing happen to me when I tried it the first time. I still went ahead and completed the process of making ACV. It turned out good. However, as a precaution, I avoided consuming that ACV. Instead, I used it for hair rinse and for skin. To avoid recurrence of the same problem, now I use a very narrow jar, and stuff apple slices in vertical position.


Adoy 2 years ago

Thanks so much for your response, I'll be sure to follow your instruction while I prepare another ACV. If I may ask, which is better, making ACV from peels and cores, or from whole apple? Cos it seems making it from peels only takes about 2 months+, while from whole apple takes about 6 months or more, at least from my findings. So, is the whole apple thing really worth the wait? Thank you.


101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 2 years ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

Hi Adoy, to hold the apple slices down, you could put a river-bed pebble on the top. This works if you have stuffed apple slices vertically and tightly. Commercial ACV is produced from whole apples crushed (some brands remove apple seeds.). I usually use peels, no core. I use that ACV for external purposes. For drinking, I make ACV from whole apples. It doesn't take me take six months, if I get good apples.


Adoy 2 years ago

Understood. You are kind... Thank you.


Susan 19 months ago

I am just wondering if removing seeds will be more beneficial because someone told me that apple seeds contain Arsenic. Please advise.


101Ways2Life profile image

101Ways2Life 19 months ago from Clean and Green New Zealand Author

Hi Susan, yes, I have heard that too. If you are concerned, please remove seeds while making apple cider vinegar.


Aladdins Cave profile image

Aladdins Cave 18 months ago from Melbourne, Australia

WOW That was great. Now I have see if we can make at home.

Let you know how it works out

Cheers from DOWNUNDER


Astralrose profile image

Astralrose 13 months ago from India

I bought a bottle of ACV but I think it is pasteurized or non-organic because it's clear. I will use it to dishes and hair, anyway.

But I will definitely try this at home. Only that, instead of a litre I'll make less so if it fails, I'll save myself from saying "I should have eaten the apples instead".

Anyway, great hub!


danielhunter10 profile image

danielhunter10 5 days ago from Gold Coast

Thanks for the idea. I will give this a go.

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