How a rancid scone changed my life

Taro bun with green filling?
Taro bun with green filling? | Source

The Genie was out of the bottle

What I found inside, was pretty much exactly what you can see in the photo opposite. Except it wasn't a taro bun, it was a cheese scone here in the UK.

It was a disgusting thing to bite into. I wasn't a happy person in that moment.

But in some ways, it was also the best thing I had ever bitten into!

What is food anyway?

I've always been a good eater, in the sense of enjoying a wide variety of foods. However, I've always felt that there's something seriously amiss in our relationship with food. Even as I child, I had misgivings as to what and how we ate.

For example, I felt uncomfortable eating animals, and found it strange the way we cooked animals and ate them for apparently no reason whatsoever (and as I learned later on in life, that's exactly what we were doing, eating them for no reason whatsoever!) Then there were also celebrations, which I joined in readily, for example at Christmas, with great quantities of all the usual Christmas treats. But it all seemed so weird somehow, making food the complete focus of happiness. It seemed so strange! Limited somehow, and really, a little sad.

I felt the infinity of space, the billions of stars in this one galaxy alone, and the love of some Creative Intelligence behind all things... And here we were, stuffing things into our mouths?


The fateful cheese scone

As I entered adulthood, I adapted my food to something I felt more comfortable with. For example, I became vegetarian in my early twenties, both for health reasons and for compassion. It seemed like eating meat, when there are other healthier sources of protein, was just pointless really. I immediately enjoyed a kitchen with less greasy dishes to clean!

I also became fitter and stronger, and mentally sharper. I have no idea what goes into making big juicy cows or chickens, and I think I'd rather not know. Or maybe people should know. How we ingest growth hormones given to them, how animals are fed proteins from the ground up product of their own kind; and so on. How even organically reared creatures release quantities of adrenalin into their flesh when they're executed, which humans then ingest; and so on.


God comes to see without ringing the bell
God comes to see without ringing the bell | Source

But all of this was just the beginning, right?

I felt like someone who knows something's not quite right, but couldn't put my finger on what. I was, after all, working against centuries and millennia of food habit and food doctrine, in all its rightness (in some cases), and wrongness (in other cases).

The rancid scone I bit into on that sunny day, was like an alarm bell going off. For years that rancid scone continued to be a reminder of something, but I just couldn't work out what?

I felt like something was creeping up on me, and I had to take note.

Hey, you, crazy vegan!

Some kind of conviction of spirit came about, when I knew that where I had to go, I had to let go of being bothered what people thought of me.

Food is such an intrinsic part of human social interaction, that if you plan to change the formula, you've got to expect some uncomfortable feedback from people.

I had already gone through that process turning vegetarian. I knew in my heart that I wanted to refine my food even more, and become vegan.

We had moved to the country, and lived beside a dairy farm. I'd known about cow stress and pain as a vague concept, but I'd never witnessed calves being separated from their mothers, and hearing the anguish go on for days and days. Also, I felt really dairy-ed out, over-milky, sinuses gummy, and was ready for a change. Again, for health and compassion, I thought I'd go vegan.

And so, just like that, I became vegan.

It wasn't that big a deal for me, as I wasn't reliant on anything non-vegan. I was expecting cravings, for maybe cheese or something (but not a cheese scone!!) but I can honestly say I had none. I actually thought about it, and I've tried to pull out a story about it, how I suffered some kind of withdrawal going vegan, but there was really nothing. It was a relief to be honest, to get away from all that milkiness.


Vegan food blew my mind!

Vegan chocolate cake
Vegan chocolate cake | Source
Vegan black bean quesadilla and lentil dal soup
Vegan black bean quesadilla and lentil dal soup | Source
Vegan meal
Vegan meal | Source

(Actually, these pictures aren't that great an example of vegan food. They make a vegan diet look a bit too clean somehow, sterile even, which is far, far, far from the truth. It's basically all the same food!!You don't have to be a meat eater to eat a good curry or chips, just as two examples... ;-)) )

It was easy. I didn't regret it at all. I hadn't been reliant psychologically on any foods that needed milk or eggs, or honey. Again, I felt better getting away from dairy. As a concept, I'd heard that cow's milk is designed for cows (kind of makes sense thinking of it that way), and more specifically to help turn calves into huge beasts, but it was only by cutting milk out that I began to understand the truth of it. I felt leaner, cleaner, better. The adverts, that milk makes your bones strong, were wrong in the sense that they weren't telling the whole story. They were, after all, adverts. There's better sources of calcium in various fruits and vegetables (see end of hub for more info).

Also, I started to get why certain nations that don't do cow's milk, find the average Westerner quite milky smelling. If someone eats a lot of onion, they smell of onion... that can happen to me! :-)) Likewise with milk.

I grew up in France. I ate a LOT of cheese. So much, in fact, that my cheese memories are so complete, that I shall never miss not having cheese ever again!


Thank you rancid scone!

It's kind of strange the way a rancid scone catapulted me to a different way of life. Well, not so much catapulted, as edged forward slowly, in truth. But it was always there, that moment in time, when it all came together, when I opened up the scone to have a look inside at the green innards.

I see now that really the scone just acted as a catalyst for a bunch of things that were already simmering just beneath the surface. A feeling of things not being right.

Without that scone, I still would have been creaking on knees that were bearing too much weight. I would have felt that discomfort in me from eating things that didn't agree with me, without understanding the source.


I get it now. I had to try a food change for a long period of time to understand the effect of these things I was eating. I understand now why some people are so scatty and/or agitated and/or depressed, always dealing with feelings of unwellness, which are interpreted as just being in a 'bad mood' or unhappy.

Without trying various food changes for a sustained period of time, I wouldn't have realized how much better I felt.

Actually, since incorporating tonnes of fruit into my diet, things have improved still, but that's for another hub.

So thank you rancid scone!

And thank you for reading, I hope it was an enjoyable use of your time :-))


About Milk

Though there is Calcium in milk, milk has a tonne of things in it that humans are better off without.

To quote from http://www.pcrm.org/health/health-topics/calcium-and-strong-bones

Dairy Products do contain calcium, but it is accompanied by animal proteins, lactose sugar, animal growth factors, occasional drugs and contaminants, and a substantial amount of fat and cholesterol in all but the defatted versions.

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Comments 6 comments

Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

I just love how you integrate food into your life and not your life into food. I really think that there are some people who cannot drink alcohol and others that should not eat dairy and meat. And yet I have met Yogi's that survive on rice and beer. Strange what is "right for us". I think I eat meat more like a hunter. Now and then when the harvest is right but never daily as is true with dairy. Yesterday was an all vegan day as was Monday, without any thought to it.

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Electro-Denizen profile image

Electro-Denizen 2 years ago from Wales, UK Author

You hit the nail on the head, everyone is so different. Sometimes it just takes time to work out what's best for oneself. I'm kind of lucky really, none of my immediate family give me a hard time; we go out, they eat their chicken or whatever, and I eat my salads and so on. I can't judge what people eat, because the judgement itself makes me feel bad and kind of takes me away from where I'm a heading.

p.s. hubpages has taken upon itself to always email me when you publish a new hub, but no-one else I follow... you must be honored by The Hub :-)


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

How peculiar. I wonder why that would be?


Electro-Denizen profile image

Electro-Denizen 2 years ago from Wales, UK Author

I really don't understand - I may ask a question to understand under what conditions Hubpages sends emails out


loveofnight profile image

loveofnight 2 years ago from Baltimore, Maryland

I was a vegetarian for about 3 years and really miss the lifestyle. what i have found is that it is cheaper to eat unhealthy than it is to eat healthy. the one thing that i find it hard to give up is cheese. i just love this stuff. even tho i do eat meat, i still find it a little odd that people enjoy eating the dead carcass of animals. i must admit that you are making me rethink my own eating habits, which i must say is a good thing. thanks for the share.


Electro-Denizen profile image

Electro-Denizen 2 years ago from Wales, UK Author

Thanks for stopping by loveofnight. I suppose eating unhealthily is cheap, though has to be said meat is really expensive, compared to, say a bag of brown rice. Ah cheese... I have very fond cheese memories. We used to have these small circular cheeses in France, with a walnut on top. I love the memory of it, not sure I'd actively enjoy it now, it's been so long.

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