What Is The Best Age To Begin Swimming Lessons?

Learning a few tips from Uncle Joe
Learning a few tips from Uncle Joe | Source

How To Decide What Age Is Right To Put Your Child In Swim Lessons

Whether summer is around the corner or it's winter and you are swimming at an indoor facility, parents have to ponder the question of when is the right age of your child to sign them up for swim lessons. The question is: at what age is it best to start swim lessons?

There is not one answer to this question; many variables should be taken into account to help you decide what age is best.

Your Child's Personality

This should be your starting determining factor on whether or not to enroll your child in swim lessons. If your child is shy, introverted, still learning their gross motor skills, then they are probably not yet ready for swim lessons in a class setting. They may still not be ready for any swim lessons in this stage and believe it or not, their age does not matter.

On the pool steps
On the pool steps | Source

Your Child's Age

Generally speaking, organized swim lesson classes start at 3 or 4 years old. I am not talking about the "Mom and Me" classes or the baby classes where they learn to float on their back. (I have done both of those and they have their advantages.) This would be a small class setting starting at pre-beginners level.

Your Child's Readiness

Ah-ha! This is what really matters! You will achieve the best results when your child is ready for swim lessons. And how do you tell if they are ready? Generally speaking, they have fun in the water, they can put their face in the water or head under the water, they show signs of mimicking those who can already swim, they want to go off the diving board, they want to be in the water every day!

Recommendations for Starting Swim Lessons for your Children

I have been teaching swim lessons privately for over 30 years. It is a passion for me. I love knowing I have helped someone become more confident and comfortable in the water. My recommendations then for the time to begin swim lessons are these:

  • When a child reaches the age of 5-6, their gross motor skills are well established in addition to easily being able to perform more than one task at a time. Since proper swimming requires a minimum of 3 tasks all at the same time (stroking, kicking and breathing), this is a good time to start swim lessons.
  • Enroll your child in a well-established program. If you do not know about the program, go and speak with the Aquatic Director and ask them the class ratio, the experience of the instructors, and the area of the pool lessons will be taught in. (Many traditional shaped pools have given way to water park style pools, so make sure there is a proper shallow area to have lessons.)
  • If possible, enroll in lessons after the early summer cooler temperatures. We live in Texas where the pool temperature is quite warm in May, but I have learned to begin lessons after the first week of June. That way the air is warmer, the sun is a little warmer, and the children will not get cold in the water. (Always apply sunscreen before lessons!)

Playing with the hose!
Playing with the hose! | Source

What To Do If The Time Is Not Right?

What if your child is not ready for any of the reasons listed above? Here is what I recommend:

  • Buy yourself a small plastic pool for the backyard. Fill it with only two inches of water. Get some safe toys and let your child play under your supervision. Another tactic you can use is the hose. We are big water conservators but there is something about playing with a hose that really intrigues and interests a young child. You can even start with an empty pool and let them play with the hose until you fill it with a few inches of water. Playing in the pool with various toys is also an excellent science lesson!
  • Bring your child to the local pool to learn to play in the water. This means you will also have to get in the water. Most water parks or public pools have a special area for toddlers to play in with a gradual grade of water level starting at zero and up to 18 inches. This is ideal for even infants to sit in, parents to sit along side, while the toddler is romping around in the water. Since you are very near, let them experiment and when they fall over be there to pick them up but don't panic, just calmly explain for them to put their arms out to catch themselves and try and stand up. This is a big accomplishment when they learn that they can fall, get wet or splashed in the face, stand back up and be OK.
  • If you own a pool, play with your children on the steps and hold them as you walk through the water. This shows them it is a fun place to be and it generally feels good. We started doing this when our children were one year olds and by the time they were two (the next season), they were happily jumping in off the side of the pool into our arms and "walking" around the edge of the pool with their arms. We taught them the words, "kick, kick, kick!" while we were holding them, and "hold on to the side" while we were taking them for a "ride" ending at the side of the pool. At this young age, only introduce the word kick because that is what they would need to do if, God forbid, they fell in the pool.
  • These recommendations sound old-fashioned but with my teaching experience I have found them to be highly successful. Ninety-five percent of the students I have taught can swim when they finish with lessons from me IF they were ready to start in the first place.
  • If the pool is still a scary place, use your bathtub as your fun place with water. Of course no swimming will take place, but you can still make it a fun place to be. I am not experienced with this because all of my kids loved the water.

Family Fun at Rainbow Beach
Family Fun at Rainbow Beach | Source

Water Safety

A water safety lesson is always included in my classes no matter what age of children in the class. You can always teach a child to throw or extend an object, to yell for help, or to know 911 should be called to help someone struggling in the water. May is National Water Safety Month. Always be safe near any body of water!

Water Safety Poll

What is the #1 rule of swimming?

  • Never put your face under water.
  • Never swim while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • Never swim alone, always swim with a buddy.
  • Never make a water rescue unless you are trained to do so.
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Please share any tips you may have on your experience with swim lessons. 6 comments

johnr54 profile image

johnr54 2 years ago from Texas Author

Thank You! I love what I do so it's easy to share.


JPSO138 profile image

JPSO138 2 years ago from Cebu, Philippines, International

Very useful tips indeed. I was always thinking of what age would my child start swimming lessons. Your hub surely provided a good insight.


Vickiw 3 years ago

This is a really useful article. Must be lovely to be able to use your pool for lessons - at least that is what I understand. You must be extremely popular with your neighbours! Learning to swim is so important for young children, and also so much fun when a knowledgeable teacher is in charge.


kittythedreamer profile image

kittythedreamer 4 years ago from the Ether

My daughter is 4 and has been taking swim lessons for the past 3 summers...I started her young but I felt it would be beneficial as we live in Florida and there are pools and water everywhere. AWesome tips!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America

Very good information. Our boys started swim lessons when they were 5-6. I'm so glad they went. Our daughter missed swimming lessons. I wish I could go back and make sure she had them. She's like me scared of the water.

We have lakes all around us. I remember two men were standing on the dock. One of the men's 10 year old son was with them he fell in the water and they couldn't find him. He died, if he had known how to swim maybe he wouldn't have.

Great hub Voted up and shared.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

Voting this up and useful. My parents taught us how to swim at such young ages that I don't even remember the beginning "lessons." Their first home was a lake cottage next to my grandmother's home on a lake. Even when they built the first home I remember as a child in the countryside of Wisconsin which was not on water, we would often swim at my grandmother's home.

I think it is important to teach kids how to swim at early ages as you suggested. It could save their lives someday! Most importantly...it is fun!!! Sounds like you are well credentialed to be giving advice. Sharing this with my followers.

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