How to Make a Portable Survival Kit

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What Do You Need?

Survival techniques and tools have become quite the thing for hunters and other outdorrsmen to be knowledgeable in over the last decade or so. Perhaps we are trying--albeit halfheartedly--to get back to our roots in some shape or fashion. But actually, this new interest in emergency and wilderness survival has created some rather new tools which are perfect for putting together one’s own portable survival kit.

As in any other survival kit, less means more. Having a few good items or tools is better than having a lot of inferior items in your kit. In this article we will discuss the most important of the items necessary for your portable survival kit. Basic survival skills are taken into consideration as we don’t want to have more than we can properly carry or store.

We will only discuss quality tools and products as your life may indeed depend on the selected items. It is suggested you practice using the tools and techniques for employing them as you compile this very important survival package.

Basic and Essential Survival Items

1--Fire starting kit ........................................................9--cotton for tender

2--Knife and/or multi-tool ...........................................10--flaslight

3--First aid kit .............................................................11--sewing kit

4--Whistle ...................................................................12--water treatment tablets

5--Mirror ......................................................................13--compass

6--Cord ........................................................................14--Snare wire

7--Basic survival guide ................................................15--Thermal blanket

8--fish hooks and line ...................................................16--small ax or hatchet

Quality Is The thing!

Actually, the recent interest in emergency and wilderness survival has created some rather new tools which are perfect for putting together one’s own portable survival kit. Special alloys have enabled many manufactures to create tools today which are much more durable and easier to use than those offered in the past. Even products from the aerospace industry have found their way into some survival kits.

As in any other survival kit, less means more. Having a few good items or tools is better than having a lot of inferior items in your kit. In this article we will discuss the most important of the items necessary for your portable survival kit. Basic survival skills are taken into consideration as we don’t want to have more than we can properly carry or store.

We will only discuss quality tools and products as your life may indeed depend on the selected items. It is suggested you practice using the tools and techniques for employing them as you compile this very important survival package.

Source
United Cutlery Bush Master Survival Knife
United Cutlery Bush Master Survival Knife

Almost a fully stocked survival kit in itself besides the great blade. check out the many extra tools and survival aids included.

 
Leatherman 830039 Wave Multitool with Leather/Nylon Combination Sheath, Silver
Leatherman 830039 Wave Multitool with Leather/Nylon Combination Sheath, Silver

I sell more of these great multi-tools than any other model. Wonderfully equipped for all situations and uses.

 
Victorinox Swiss Army Huntsman Pocket Knife with Leather Pouch, Red,Red with Pouch,91mm
Victorinox Swiss Army Huntsman Pocket Knife with Leather Pouch, Red,Red with Pouch,91mm

The original multi-tool is still around an now even better. Packed with great tools the Swiss Army kife is still a winner.

 

Choosing A Good cutting Edge

The most important item in your portable survival kit is a knife and/or multi-tool. A multi-tool would be the preference but only if it is of good quality. There are loads of cheap multi-tools on the market, and in this case, you get what you pay for. The same goes with survival knives. Don’t skimp on quality on either of these tools as your life, or that of your family and friends, may depend on it.

Choose a survival knife with a good heavy blade of quality steel because it may be used for chopping limbs as well as for cutting and slicing objects also. A multi-tool should contain a wood saw as it is one of the most useful of tools in the deep woods for survival purposes.

These are two items you must choose well. You may start a fire by rubbing two sticks together if you have the skill, but having a good sharp cutting tool is of the utmost importance for any survival attempt. This was one of man’s first tools and it still remains so today. You cannot argue with thousands of years of success.

Source

Fire Starting Tools and Aids

Elk Ridge 4-Piece  Fire Starter Kit with Striker
Elk Ridge 4-Piece Fire Starter Kit with Striker

Four individual magnesium flint fire starting survival tools. Very inexpensive for the value and enough for several spares.

 
Wilderness Solutions Scout Fire Piston - Includes tinder and fire making materials
Wilderness Solutions Scout Fire Piston - Includes tinder and fire making materials

Merely the best fire starting tool for the serious survivalist. Quick, easy to use, and works under extremely harsh conditions. Made by Coleman so you know they can be depended on in serious situations.

 
Coleman 829-205T Waterproof Matches (4 Pack)
Coleman 829-205T Waterproof Matches (4 Pack)

The old standby and everyone knows how to use these handy items to start a fire.

 

Fire Starting Skills and Aids

Perhaps the most important of all survival skills is the ability to start a fire. Besides the obvious use of a fire for warmth or cooking purposes, a fire is also useful for signaling a rescue party or for keeping wild animals at bay. Fire may be used for sterilizing water and for fabricating tools or shelter material.

There are several options to choose from for the fire starting items included in your portable survival kit so we’ll discuss them first. The most easily stored and maintenance free fire starting tool is the magnesium flint tool. Used with some cotton lint it can easily start a fire in adverse conditions if called for.

Another new innovation is the fire piston. Operating on the same principle as the diesel engine. it will instantly create an ember from many different tinder types by using compressed air. A rather costly item, but one of then easiest to use in survival conditions. Of course, there is the old standby of waterproof matches or even a disposable lighter if cost is an issue. One of these items is a must in your survival kit.

Like the scouts, you should be prepared for anything with your portable survival kit.
Like the scouts, you should be prepared for anything with your portable survival kit. | Source
SE CCH5-1 5-IN-1 Survival Whistle in Orange
SE CCH5-1 5-IN-1 Survival Whistle in Orange

Great item for your portable survival kit. Includes whistle, mirror, compass, lanyard, and match storage space.

 
Rothco 550lb. Type III Nylon Paracord
Rothco 550lb. Type III Nylon Paracord

The best and most used paracord in the survival game. High strength and lightweight portability make it a must for any survival kit.

 

Optional Survival Kit Items

Another essenntial item for your portable survival kit is some good strong cord. True survivalists use what is know as paracord. Able to withstand weights of over 500 pounds, this durable military type cord may be used for a number of different construction purposes , as well as for climbing or descending steep inclines. But once again, including some kind of strong cord in your kit is a must.

Supplying a whistle, small mirror, flashlight and other signaling devices should be easy and inexpensive enough as these items are simply to procure. Fish hooks and mono-filament line also are cheap, take up little space in the kit, and may be used to procure a source of food in the wild.

Depending on the portability you have in mind for your survival kit, there are many other items to choose from. Snare wire for catching small animals for food, a thermal blanket to help guard against the elements, water purifying tablets, and even a small thermal tent may be added to your portable survival kit.

Finishing Up The Package

A five gallon bucket should hold your survival items as anything bigger will slow you down if leaving in a hurry is necessary. Having more than one storage container will only multiply the chances of losing an important item if one of the survival containers is missing or left behind.

Make your kit as big or as small as you feel comfortable with maintaining and transporting by hand. You may not have the luxury of driving it to your destination in the event of a disaster or emergency. Choose the items wisely and feel secure in any emergency. Remember, don’t skimp on the important stuff if you want to survive a disaster or emergency.

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Comments 66 comments

billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

Great suggestions Randy! I've been schooled in this for years and your hub covers everything needed for survival....good job!


diogenes profile image

diogenes 4 years ago from UK and Mexico

Will go through this again later. I enjoy Ray Mears on TV and, yes, I think it is something to do with getting back to our hunter-gatherer beginings.

I have the good knife so far! A Shcrade Bear Claw i bought just before they went belly-up.

Bob


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 4 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Always wanted a piston firestarter ... a bit much though. I think a foragable. foods book might come in handy too!

Ben


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks BillyBuc! There's a fine line with getting too many survival tools and items if one isn't careful. Thanks for stopping by.

SSSSS


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@diognese--Hey Bob! There does seem to be a revived interest in survival skills. I wonder how much it has to do with the Mayan calendar event coming on 12-21-12? I know I've sold quite a bit of survival tools and gear over the last few years. Did someone buy out Schrade or did they quit making knives altogether? Thanks for your time.

SSSSS


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Ben Zltac--Me too, Ben. Sorta expensive but very reliable. I'd rather start a fire with two sticks if the weather is dry, impresses the rookies LOL-but in wet conditions a piston fire starter is hard to beat. I wonder if they would be hard to make? Hmmmm.

Yes, a good wild foods book is good to have along and should be included in the survival book included in the kit. I'll mention this in the next edit.

Thanks for the comments, Ben!

SSSSS


Cardisa profile image

Cardisa 4 years ago from Jamaica

Hey Randy I never packed an outdoor survival kit before but I guess it's similar to a hurricane kit. This is really great.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hi Cardisa! Yes, it is indeed similar (I've been in Jamaica during a mild hurricane a few years ago) but it does depend on one's particular area of the country what items you'll need the most. For instance, you might not need an emergency thermal blanket in your portable survival kit. LOL!

Thanks for the comments and good to hear from you.

SSSSS


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 4 years ago from Arizona

Randy, Good article, I have a mini kit on me all the time, I wear military cargo pants and a survival tin dropped in the leg pocket is just a good thing to have. The kit you showed in the video is good as well, especially if your going out and know it ahead of time. I use a 3 day assault pack for a "Bail out bag" if I have to un-ass my vehicle in a hurry and a rifle always on hand to go with. need to send you some pics. I've thought on writing on this topic but there is so much in print at the forum boards of places I train it would be easier to just refer to the Disaster preparedness boards for the 101s of this or a good source to get up to date info on stuff that we have used and is good to go. I digress if you want links I can kick them to you some really great stuff to read there.

This is a good post to get folks thinking on having something to help them get home with them all the time.

Peace,

dusty


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I would have bet a pretty penny you carried some sort of survival gear on you, Dusty. I feel positively naked without a knife of some sort on my person if not my multi-tool also. Actually, the amount of survival gear one needs in their kit depends on the ability of the person assembling it. It doesn't hurt to have some things which make the experience a bit easier though.

I've written several other survival type hubs but this was an exclusive title offered and I thought I'd see if it did any better than those where I made up the title. Time will tell!

Thanks for stopping by, Dusty!

SSSSS


CloudExplorer profile image

CloudExplorer 4 years ago from New York City

Thanks for this awesome survival kit hub, I did indeed like the detailing and informative approach you took in writing this hub here.

I will only add to it the necessity of having good footwear, and clean socks, because without our feet we won't make it far.

Awesome hub here, you've also managed to cover a great deal of useful items people will surely need, while at the same time by keeping things simple for them to maximize potential for survival.

Great job Randy, I'm dropping you a inbox message today, just check your email whenever you can, and its nice meeting you on hubpages.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks so much for the visit and comments, CloudExplorer. Good idea about the footwear as it's always important to have dry feet if possible in a survival situation.

I've checked my email but so far, no message from you yet. I wonder if HP still hasn't replaced my contact info as they removed it during my 3 month forum ban. If so let me know and I'll contact you. Nice to meet you also. :)

Thanks again!

SSSSS


Gnarles Snarkly profile image

Gnarles Snarkly 4 years ago from Hoosegow, Florida

Love it! Great job. Here in Florida, we like to keep a fresh survival kit ready for hurricane season. I find good stuff in the Boy Scout section of Ace Hardware. You can get military medic kits online now. They have all you will need, unless you get decapited or something.

Since nuts roll downhill, and end up in Florida, I keep a loaded 45 in mine. Of course, a fishing pole and basic tackle box help, too.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hey Gnarles! Thank for checking out my hub. Sorry to take so long to respond but I've been in an internet-free part of Georgia. Not free internet, just none at all! LOL! Appreciate the input, as always. :)

SSSSS


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 4 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

Well, I have everything you listed so we not only Nibiru fans but are literally on the same page with the survival pack.

I actually have three, two small ones and a biggie.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Good to know as I respect your opinion. Now for the wind generator and solar panels. Of course, the sun might not shine for a few years after......

Thanks for the visit and vote of confidence! :)

SSSSS


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 4 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

Yeah wind generators are expensive big time, saw a big timber rattler couple of weekends ago when I was scouting some fishing holes, got a good picture and was wondering how I could fit him into an article.

I was thinking of staying mobile and moving around a bit with maybe a base camp or two although I'm not from TN it certainly has its possibilities.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Not too difficult to build a wind turbine if you are good with tools, but keeping a low profile might be difficult using much new technology.

Snake articles do okay for me, but nothing spectacular. But you may have better luck.

Isolated spots are no problem for me. Plenty of swamps.

SSSSS


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ

Good stuff here. When my husband was in the Army, he went on a survival camp in Death Valley. They had a pair of pants, a t-shirt, boots and socks on their feet, a 4x4 foot plastic tarp and a knife. They were out there for 2 weeks and on their own. No two men together. Out of 20 men, two had to be rescued, dehydration; all but one lost 15 pounds or more. The one who did not lose weight, actually gained weight. It was of course, my husband. He is the one I want with me in a survival situation.

He has a knife just like yours and he loves it. It is actually his second. The first one had a blade break when he was using it to fix an electrical outlet and a surge broke it. He was using gloves and so had no damage to him. They replace those free of charge when they get broken. His survival kit also has a sheet of clear plastic due to his desert training. He also has a collapsible bucket and shovel in his pack, they really comes in handy.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Wow Becky, sound like your husband rally went through a strict training regimen for the army. I'll bet he learned a lot from the experience though.

Yes, it does depend on your part of the world for the little extra necessities of survival. Thanks loads for your much appreciated comments and time on this one. :)

SSSSS


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ

Randy, he was in Special Forces and they never knew what part of the world they would end up in. They tried to train them to take care of themselves if something unforeseen happened. I think they managed pretty well. He also spent some time in the Arctic training but didn't get sent out to survive. Too dangerous there to mess around.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

You should be proud of his experiences, Becky. It's a lot tougher to do than it seems. I'd hate to have to try to survive in any type of arctic situation. Give me the hot south anytime! :)

SSSSS


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ

I am proud of him Randy. He kept us going for years while we were fighting to get his VA disability. He would hunt and trap and take care of the kids while I worked and that was just enough that we got through. He is disabled now, but he still has the knowledge. Between us (I know a lot of the plant foods), we can get through anything.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

He sounds like a heckuva guy, Becky. I'm sure he appreciates you too! A man who would do so much for his family is something to be proud of in this day and time. A hard life isn't necessarily a bad life and is often something to be proud of.

SSSSS


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Hi Randy, I learned some of this in Girl Guides :) Thanks for the reminder. Disasters could strike at any moment, it is important to be prepared. We recently had a Tsunami evacuation (that turned out to be a non-event) and I realized how unprepared I am (still). Must put together a survival kit. Had an emergency kit in the car that has slowly been dismantled from using bits and pieces of it for non emergency situations, need to re-stock it. Regards, snakeslane


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for stopping by, Snakeslane. Yes, it only takes a little time and not too much cash to assemble a good portable survival kit. Peace of mind is worth it! Good to hear from you. :)

Randy


Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

Wesman Todd Shaw 3 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

Awesome stuff here, Good Sir, and keep it coming!

I'd likely chump out quick...but maybe not, in any case, filling the head with bread ain't a bad thing.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Ha! This is an "exclusive title" which is now idled, Wesman. So much for those titles. lol! thanks for stopping by as usual!


rasta1 profile image

rasta1 3 years ago from Jamaica

Survival of the fittest. Thanks for reminding me that it is the quality of the tools that is most important.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for checking this hub out, rasta! Yes the quality of the suvival tools is of extreme importance, especially when one is in an isolated area.


MikeNV profile image

MikeNV 3 years ago from Henderson, NV

If you are going to use water treatment tablets I'd suggest you try them out first. Might want to make you look for a filtering system and a way to easily carry and boil water. YUK is the best description I can give of them.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

You are correct, Mike. I don't vouch for their taste, and certainly a filtration system, or the option of boiling one's water, would be preferential.

Thanks for stopping by and for the excellent advice!

--RG


jpcmc profile image

jpcmc 2 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

Randy, this is a superb hub on survival items. I'm currently updating and restocking my bug out bag at home.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for reading, jpcmc. Always pays to be prepared for anything these days. :)


jpcmc profile image

jpcmc 2 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

It does Randy. After the super typhoon that struck the Philippines a few months back, it's never too soon or early to prepare.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

You got that right, jpcmc! The Boy Scout' motto had it right. :)


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

An article recently on Yahoo.news described how scientist had learned that pine wood (fresh) makes an excellent water filter and would even filter diseased lake water up to 97% efficient, so that you could drink it without having to boil it.

Another handy item is to save dryer lint to use incase you can't find any dry tender when its rainy or wet, just a little will instantly catch a spark and burn quickly.

Another item you should get is a pocket guide of edible plants in your area, as this will come in handy, when eating insects gets old.

I personally am going to use my implanted Alien tracking device to contact the Mother-ship and get the heck off the planet but for those of you that haven't been abducted lately, I wish you the best of luck.

Remember maggots from semi-fresh corpses taste just like shrimp, if you use the right seasoning and a little imagination. Maggots are good and once you pop, you can't stop!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

All good tips and suggestions when it gets right down to it, somethingblue. I'll pass on the maggots for now though! :P


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

I wasn't suggesting that you eat them now, although getting used to the taste might make them go down a little easier, later. Just saying that pound for pound, insects provide more protein than beef and they are easier to catch, kill and you don't have to clean them, just pop 'em right in.

You don't have to hunt an insect, just turn over a rock or log and you don't need a weapon to kill them. Since there will be plenty of rotting corpses after the Shift, maggots will be plentiful and once you get pass the smell you got 'em licked . . . so to speak!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I was kidding of course, plus they make excellent fish bait if one has the option to go angling. Yes, insects are an important source of protein, ask any bird that eats them. After all, our ancestors lived by scavenging for thousands--if not millions-of years.

Thanks for your suggestions and insights, somethingblue. They are all valuable tips if one ever has the need for a survival situation.


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

I wrote an article here on Hub Pages entitled Insects . . . It's What's For Dinner, a sort of tongue in cheek look at alternative food sources.

Have you ever considered how the first caveman convinced his buddies to go Mammoth hunting?

Imagine the scenario . . . Johnny Joe Caveman invents a spear, then he goes to his buddies hanging around the blackberry bush eating dessert and says "Yo, I'll teach you guys how to make a spear and we can all go kill a mammoth and eat meat for a week."

His buddies look at him like he is from the planet Krypton and say "Yo, this blackberry bush won't stomp us to death, why don't you go kill it and tell us how that works out for you."

I mean c'mon we exist on this planet for millions of years eating fruits, nuts, vegetables and the occasional cricket or fish and then one day we get the idea to kill and eat meat, it doesn't compute.

Someone had to show us that maneuver, 'cuz I just don't see the motivation. Further more before we invented spears what did we do run down deer and bite it to death, with our molars? Hello, anybody home, where are the claws, fangs and incredible strength and speed?

We live on the planet for 60 million years and then in the last thirty thousand we learn how to kill and there goes paradise, think about it?!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Johnny Joe Caveman? lol! Are you suggesting the first caveman was from the south? lol!

We simply didn't progress from being vegetarians and insectivores to hunting and killing animals overnight. I'd think we stole the prey of other predators either before or after they got through killing it. Scavenging was the transitional phase between being mostly vegetarian to being omnivorous I believe.


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

But, why is my point, sure we would need to supplement our diet with meat but overall the majority of our nutrition could be gained from veggies, so why start killing at all?

I'm saying the whole weapons technology phase came from another source altogether (off planet). If you buy into the Annunaki coming to this planet 400,000 years ago to mine gold, maybe we picked up killing from them. According to legend they did a lot of killing.

Of course we are getting off the topic but I guess what I'm trying to say is that if we truly want peace on this planet then after the Shift we will have the opportunity to create a whole new paradigm and that could start with learning not to kill and it starts with what we eat.

Sorry, I've been living down here now for so long I'm starting to write like trailer living, sign shooting, appliances in the front yard having, living over yonder in the Holler, redneck, pecker wood, not that there is anything wrong with that, mind you.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

The Annunaki legend--or myth--is a very interesting story, but I'm not sure I buy into the whole thing. After all, if some ETs had the know-how to come from a far planet, then would be able to create robots to do the labor for them.

Some think our brains only became bigger after turning to meat instead of fruits. They claim the added protein and calories were needed to operate a big brain. Personally, I like both meat and potatoes.


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

Neanderthal Man, which have only a vegetarian diet, have a bigger brain than we do, no meat. Incidentally they did survive but are commonly misidentified as Big foot or Yeti. They have retreated to the remote parts of the World, sleep mostly underground during the day and are nocturnal. Their telepathic abilities allow them to 'sense' humans many miles away and easily avid them. They are master of camouflage and avoid human contact at all cost.

Why create expensive robots that require maintenance and require a factory to build when you already have a ready made labor force on the ground? The Annunaki live on a planet that orbits our Sun every 3,600 years so when it comes around our Sun it is in our solar system and doesn't require a long space flight, just a little hop , skip and jump.

Because one Nibiru year equals 3,600 Earth years, they would seem to be immortal to us and live a very long time on Earth and be considered Gods to ancient man.

The age old myth that humans require protein from meat is just for control purposes. If you can convince folks that they need to eat cows to live healthy lives, guess what most people will eat cows. Living sells itself and you don't need an advertising campaign. If four out of five dentists tell you that fluoride in your water is good for your teeth, then most people will by into the farce.

Fluoride serves two purposes, it is a masking agent for all the other chemicals and it calcifies the Pineal Gland. The Pineal Gland is the God organ and helps humans to use their sixth sense, which when operating correctly allows you to astral project, use telepathy and instantly know the truth about any subject as it will help you to access the Akashic records.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Where did you find out that neanderthals were vegetarian? It's the first I've heard of that being the case. I suppose they used leaves for clothing since they didn't kill animals for their skins, and this too in a cold climate.

Got a link to this info?


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

Sure do, Neanderthal Man doesn't wear clothes they have no need to, they're covered in thick hair (fur).

You can go to Lloyd Pye's website http://www.lloydpye.com/ or read as I have, Everything You Know Is Wrong, which is a fascinating and unparalleled look at our origins.

The website will get you started and he has many videos of his lectures and even a movie you can order. He concentrates on the many facts left out of our history books and weaves them into a tapestry that will leave you stunned.

His research encompasses over fifty years of teaching at a major University, he makes the creation of man by a highly evolved Alien civilization far more believable than any author I have ever read and I have read them all.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Intriguing theory but I can't see how they figured out the skull resembled an alien gray skull, unless they have one to compare it to of course. Just a bit too far fetched for my taste.


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

The Starchild skull is a minor footnote in his theory of our origins and it will take you days, even if you are a fast reader, to get through it all.

The book Everything You Know Is Wrong is what really describes his theory best and is incredibly fascinating but deals mostly with our history and not with Aliens, or you can watch his many videos.

What makes it so believable is that it matches with many other ancient origin stories from civilizations in our past and takes you where Darwin dared not go. It also coincides with some channeled material I have read about Neanderthal Man and how they moved in a different, less warlike direction from Cro-Magnon or us.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Okay, but please post the link to Neanderthals being vegetarian and their habit of not wearing any type of protective clothing in the cold environments they lived.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

You make some good points, Randy, and so does somethgblue. My first thought on the Neanderthals was their skeletons, seemingly built for meat-chewing and a tough life in general. But then I thought about gorillas, who are strictly omnivorous if not mistaken. So, kinda of in the middle now. Anyway, most interesting discussion my friend.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

One other thought: hasn't the Neanderthal genome been recently discovered in some modern humans? If so wouldn't that indicate they at least mingled some with Cro-Magons and thus been exposed to carnivorous habits?


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

I did post the link, in his book Everything You Know Is Wrong he spells it out in very plain English exactly how Neanderthal Man still exists in modern times by living in remote areas of the World, mostly mountainous regions in colder environments.

They live a nomadic lifestyle and travel great distances, they eat mostly nuts, fruits, berries and indigenous plants. They will occasionally eat flesh such as fish and insects, eggs, etc., they sleep during the day and forage at night. They have very good eyesight, communicate telepathically with each other and can easily avoid humans as they have had millions of years of practice.

Do you see bears wearing clothing? Do you see elk wearing clothes? Use some common sense, they can make fire but they don't use it so why give away your position. They have existed here far longer than modern man and know this planet like the back of their hand.

I could go on and on but the point is if you want the information I have given you the link . . . go read the book, hello?


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

"...go read the book, hello? Your doing a pretty good job yourself of explaining it. Neanderthals still alive and extant? I believe the case for Bigfoot is more persuasive, especially after the recent announcement with the three top DNA samples' results in.:)


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

See, here is the thing about our conditioned society, the majority of humans are all about proof. Because generations of folks have been raised on TV dramas, where by the shows end you have your proof neatly wrapped up and given to you, no thinking is involved.

You literally have the TV do your thinking for you, neat & simple, all you have to do is sit there and listen and watch.

In 2003 the US Supreme Court ruled that TV News Stations were not required to tell their audiences the truth. That TV was entertainment and the News could literally be made up any way they saw fit . . . guess how many News Stations covered that story?

The point is, if you require proof, because you're to lazy or incompetent to think for yourself then you will never know the truth because, the Fake Stream Media, isn't about the truth. They are about telling you what their Masters tell them to dish out to you. Knowledge is Power and those that don't have it are more easily controlled.

Ever wonder why you never see any good photos or videos of Big Foot? Any idea why?

Because they don't want you to see them, period end of story.

They don't want you to realize that there is a completely separate race of humans living on and in this planet far older than modern man, that your government has no control over. That doesn't pay rent to live here, doesn't get diseased, doesn't fight, doesn't have a job . . . hello? Seeing the picture.

We have been lied to on so many levels it isn't even funny but because, no one reads books anymore they prefer to let, the TV or YouTube do their thinking for them and require proof to believe anything then they will be lead around like sheep!

Baa, Baa . . . go read a book!


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

Your preaching to the choir, dude. I don't watch TV much at all and there are good photos of BF and videos too. You're right about TPTB not wanting stuff like strong BF evidence out. Maybe the Neanderthals can show us the way to utopia but I doubt it. And please don't be condescending to people with your Baa, Baa sheeple go read a book line anymore. Chow....:)

Apologize for jumping in on your and somethgblue's discussion, Randy.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

No problem, Alastar. These discussions are always interesting to me, no matter if I agree with the opinions or not. You're always welcome to chime in on them with your 2 cents worth! :)


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

Haha, two cents from me is right on, Randy! Look forward to you and the 'blue's continued posts here my friend. Think I'll get off the playing field and join the others in the stands, but thanks!


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

Boo, Hoo . . . only a person insecure in their own intelligence 'might' find (go read a book), condescending

The point I was trying to make is that 'you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him swim.'

If I provide a link when requested and the person prefers not to read the material, then it is out of my hands. Without getting the book out and finding the exact page and description, all I can do is para-phrase the material, which I already did.

The Neanderthal's decided to 'find' their own way to Utopia, on a different spiritual path in harmony with nature. They asked for and received permission from the Keepers of the Garden (Dolores Cannon) to co-exist on this planet with mankind. They were given the tools and means to do so.

Their primary location is the Himalayas, which by the way is a mountain range near Tibet and China that is as large as the mainland of the United States, that is more than enough room to stay hidden from humanity, as much of it is unexplored.

There are five different species or races of Neanderthal of which only one could be considered aggressive, they live all over the world, some in the jungles of South America, some in the Pacific Northwest, USA.

Think of all the biggest animals on the planet, one of the things they have in common is that they eat plants and yet grow to huge sizes. Think of the animals that live above 10,000 feet, none of them wear clothes.

I'm not asking anyone to agree with me, I'm asking that you research and think about how a race of man could exist and hardly ever be seen, right under our noses.

Humanity 'thinks' they have conquered the land masses on this planet, they haven't even come close.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

That's " You can lead a condescending horse to water but you can't make him drink the liquid of politeness." I truly wanted to read all your comment, but after the first two sentences lost all desire to. Over and out...chow.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Er...weren't there even larger creatures that were carnivorous back during the era of the dinosaurs than exist now? T Rex being an example of a larger land dwelling creature than exists presently. This seems to indicate that meat eaters can obtain size and mass as well.

Forget the link, I'll do my own research as to Neanderthal man's diet and clothing, or lack thereof.


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

Looks like it is time to write a Hub on the matter . . . Neanderthal Man Is Big Foot!

Yes, meat eaters can obtain mass . . . and the point is? T Rex exist now . . . where?


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'll be looking forward to your hub, somethingblue. Good luck with that theory.


somethgblue profile image

somethgblue 2 years ago from Shelbyville, Tennessee

Everything You Know Is Wrong by Lloyd Pye, page 113.

Sasquatch, The Apes Among Us by John Green, chapter 20, page 366.

Abominable Snowmen by Ivan T. Sanderson, chapter 8, page 148.

I will provide more links in the upcoming article but that should get you started, alas I can't claim the theory as my own.


Victoria Lynn profile image

Victoria Lynn 2 years ago from Arkansas, USA

I've been meaning to put together a survival kit. I have several of the items--just gotta finish it. Great tips here!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

You never know when a situation will arise, Victoria. Better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it. That's deep isn't it? :P

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