Sleep Habits Linked to Childhood Obesity!

Obesity may not just be the result of over-eating or the wrong types of food.
Obesity may not just be the result of over-eating or the wrong types of food.

Kids, Sleep and Obesity

Sleep just published a very interesting article about Australian kids and sleep and its relationship to obesity.

Researchers at the University of South Australia studied over 2,000 children, ages nine to 16, including their sleep time, when they went to bed and when they awoke and of course, their weight.

They came up with some interesting facts.

It's not how much sleep the kids get, but rather when they go to bed and awake, that affects their weight and activity levels.
It's not how much sleep the kids get, but rather when they go to bed and awake, that affects their weight and activity levels.

The Study's Findings...

When it comes to sleep and obesity, the study found that kids that went to bed early and rose early were likely to be slim and active. Those, on the other hand, who went to bed late and got up late were almost twice as likely to be obese; were one-and-a-half times less active; and almost three times more likely to stay glued to the boob-tube (either TV or computer) throughout the day.

The kids in both groups got the same hours of sleep, so the number of hours they slept did not affect their weight or their behavior.

Ben Franklin was right... He just didn't know that what he said applied to our kids, too.
Ben Franklin was right... He just didn't know that what he said applied to our kids, too.

Ben Franklin Was Right!

Ben was the guy who said, "Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise!"

Little did he know how that adage would affect children--actually influencing their weight, their physical activity, and their desire to spend more of their waking hours in creative/physical pursuits other than watching a TV or a computer screen.

NOTE: I'm not saying that computers are bad or TV for that matter. But what is unhealthy is for children to sit in front of a screen, no matter what type, and gaze at it for hours on end. According to research from ChildWise 1,800 children aged five to 16 were found to spend an average of 2.7 hours a day watching TV, 1.5 on the internet and 1.3 playing on games consoles...

CAUTION: The information included herein is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan.



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