Medications and Photosensitivity

Medication Cautions for Doxycycline Hyclate. Note the first caution: "You Should Avoid Prolonged Or Excessive Exposure To Direct And/Or Artificial Sunlight While Taking This Medicine."
Medication Cautions for Doxycycline Hyclate. Note the first caution: "You Should Avoid Prolonged Or Excessive Exposure To Direct And/Or Artificial Sunlight While Taking This Medicine." | Source

Read Your Prescription Warning Labels

I'll never forget what caused me to learn about medication-induced photosensitivity.

When I was living in New Jersey several years ago, I went to an Atlantic Ocean beach with friends.

We had been sitting on our blankets on the sand for only a few minutes when my face, arms, and legs turned red...bright, painful-when-touched red.

When I'm at the beach, or at the lake near my home in Southern California now, my skin might become a little bit red. The redness changes to tan a few hours later.

This day at the beach in New Jersey was different. I turned very red very soon after arriving at the beach.

If you can imagine being scalded by boiling water and becoming bright red, you can empathize with me. If you can imagine how being scalded by boiling water feels, you can get an idea of how I felt.

I wasn't sunburnt.

My friends and I left the beach immediately and drove to the nearest drugstore. It was a Saturday in May, not yet Memorial Day Weekend, which is generally considered the start of the summer beach season. I thought I was going to be the first person that summer in Bradley Beach, New Jersey to purchase a soothing after-sun preparaton.

I asked the pharmacist to recommend a preparation for sunburn, and he informed me that I wasn't sunburnt.

?????

I had been in the sun on the beach, I was bright red, I was in pain, and I wasn't sunburnt?

Bradley Beach, New Jersey: the beach on which I was sunbathing on the day I experienced the phototoxic reaction to the sun,
Bradley Beach, New Jersey: the beach on which I was sunbathing on the day I experienced the phototoxic reaction to the sun, | Source

I had a phototoxic reaction to the sun.

The pharmacist asked me if I was currently taking any prescription medication. I said that I was — pills for my allergic rhinitis (hayfever).

He asked if I was taking anything else. I replied that I was taking something for a sinus infection. Did I have the prescription with me? Yes. Could he see the container? Yes.

The pharmacist explained that although he wasn't a physician and couldn't practice medicine, he was a pharmacist in a beach town and was often asked to recommend products that would take the burn out of a sunburn.

The pharmacist then explained that I was experiencing a phototoxic reaction to the sun. He recommended an after-sun spray and said I should stay out of the sun for the rest of the day, and call my doctor on Monday...in two days.

What is photosensitivity?

Photosensitivity is a skin inflammation caused by a combination of sunlight and certain medications. In order for this redness (Inflammation) to occur, you had to have taken a certain sun sensitive medication and be exposed to the sun. The redness looks similar to sunburn, but it isn't sunburn, and using suntan lotion or a similar product won't help you.

Photosensitive reactions are of two types — phototoxic reactions and photoallergic reactions. The reaction I had was a phototoxic reaction. The culprit in my case was Doxycycline Hyclate, the antibiotic I was taking for my sinus infection.

What is a phototoxic reaction?

A phototoxic reaction occurs when a certain medication you are taking reacts to your being exposed to direct sunlight. It's as if you were receiving a megadose of the medication all at once. Your skin becomes damaged and turns bright red. Usually only the parts of your skin that are exposed to the sun become damaged. Those parts that are covered by clothing don't experience the burn-like redness and pain.

What is a photoallergic reaction?

A photoallergic reaction occurs when the chemical structure of a medication changes when it is exposed to ultraviolet radiation. The body's immune system thinks this changed medication doesn't belong in the body, and an allergic reaction to the medication occurs. The allergic reacton, which manifests itself in the form of redness and a bumpy rash that looks like eczema, can continue long after you've stopped taking the medication. I've had allergic reactions to several medications, but thankfully have never had a photoallergic reaction.

Medications That Cause Photosensitivity

The table below lists some medications and topical preparations that are known to cause either a phototoxic or photoallergic reaction. I am not licensed to practice medicine, but I would like to recommend that if you are taking any of these medications, it would be best if you were to stay out of direct sunlight.

Phototoxic Reactions
Photoallergic Reactions
ANTIBIOTIC
ANTI-MICROBIAL
ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, levofloxacin,
chlorhexidine, dapsone,
sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline
hexachlorophene
ANTIHISTAMINE
FRAGRANCE
diphenhydramine
6-methylcoumarine, musk
CARDIAC
PAINKILLER
amiodarone, diltiazem, nifedipine,
celecoxib
quinidine
SUNSCREEN
CHEMOTHERAPY
benzophenones, cinnamate, cyclohexanol,
5-fluorouracil, dacarbazine, vinblastine
para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA),
DIABETIC
oxybenzone, salicylates
chlorpropamide, glyburide
 
DIURETIC
 
furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide
 
PAINKILLER
 
naproxen, piroxicam
 
PSYCHIATRIC
 
chlorpromazine, despiramine, imipramine
 

More by this Author


Comments 72 comments

Teresa Coppens profile image

Teresa Coppens 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Very useful hub Daisy for those suffering from either of these afflictions. Hope you haven't had a repeat of your beach experience! voted up and shared.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Teresa,

Thanks so much reading, commenting in, and sharing my Hub. I appreciate it.

When I receive a prescription medication, I make certain that I read all the warning labels on the prescription bottle. I live in Southern California, in a climate where I rarely have to wear more than a thin jacket when I'm outdoors. I try to avoid direct sunlight when I'm taking a medication that could potentially cause a photosensitivity problem.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

This has never happened to me personally, but it has happened to a friend of mine. I always pay attention to warnings on certain drugs because obviously this does happen. I seen the warning recently, but I've been on so many drugs lately I can't remember which one it was and I won't remember in the near future. Everyone just needs to pay attention to possible side effects. Informative article!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Sunshine,

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. I hope that by publishing this Hub more people will read the cautions on their prescription bottles and not experience the effects of photosensitivity that I experienced.


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Daisy....Excellent topic to bring to the forefront. It is amazing how many epople do not read labels or pamphlets at all. The problems can arise anytime, also, even if you have been taking a Rx for any length of time.

It is surprising to learn even food and Bev and OTC that must not be mixed with certain meds.

We really do need to be vigilant!! UP+++


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Paula (fpherj48),

Thanks for your comments. Compared to other types of warnings about medications, I'm surprised at how little information about phototoxic and photoallergic reactions can be found in the media.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

This reminds me of the time when I mixed a "lethal" mixture of cleaning supplies.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rebecca,

Thanks for reading my Hub and commenting in it. What occurred with the cleaning supplies? Did the fumes get to you? Or did something happen when they touched your skin?


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

Daisy, this is very useful. I also have hayfever but I can't take anti-histamines. I would have freaked out if what happened to you happened to me, sounds awful. I have never even heard of this type of reaction to a drug, scary!


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

Thanks for the warning, Daisy -- I'm certainly aware that medicine can cause certain reaction but never heard of this before. I'm surprised that sunscreen would cause photoallergic reactions -- thought that would be the least likely culprit. Voting this Up and Useful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Julie,

Thanks for your comments. The phototoxic reaction I experienced was scary. I had never heard of that happening before. I'm very careful with my medications now if I'm exposed to direct sunlight.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Aurelio,

This week's Weekly Topic Inspiration in HubPages is "Background on the Medicines We Take". When I saw that, I decided to tell my story.

I wasn't aware of the problems sunscreens could cause until I did my research for the article. It sppears that with sunscreens, it's certain "ingredients" that are the culprits. Now I see why some sunscreen advertisements state that the product doesn't contain PABA.


alissaroberts profile image

alissaroberts 4 years ago from Normandy, TN

Oh how scary! I have seen this warning on antibiotics before but honestly have never paid attention to it. I definitely will now after reading your hub. Thanks for sharing your story and all the useful info! Voted up!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Alissa,

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my Hubs.

I, too, had seen the warning labels on prescription medicine bottles. I would read the ones about whether the medication should be taken on an empty stomach or with food. I paid attention to those.

When I was living in New Jersey, if I saw the warning about exposure to the sun, it must not have registered with me. The warning doesn't explain what will happen if you're taking a medication and are exposed to direct sunlight. I'm afraid a lot of people don't realize the danger.


Dexter Yarbrough profile image

Dexter Yarbrough 4 years ago from United States

This really great information. I never paid any attention to this but now realize that I should. Providing this great information could certainly save many from suffering. Voted up!


m0rd0r profile image

m0rd0r 4 years ago from Sofia, Bulgaria

Not a cool thing to experience at all Daisy. I hope everything got well after detoxing the medicine...

Voted up and useful. The table you provided will enter my blacklist.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dexter,

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my Hubs. With your outdoor photographic work, awareness of the medications that can cause photosensitivity is important.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Stoill (m0rd0r),

Thanks for your comments. It took a few days, but I did completely recover from the phototoxicity.

I still had the sinus infection, and the only thing I could use for that was a salt water solution. I couldn't use steam because my face was sensitive due to the problem on the beach, and I was afraid to take any medication.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

What a really useful Hub, especially with beach weather coming. The reference table is out a sight! Voted up and shared!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rebecca,

Thanks for reading, commenting in, and sharing my Hub. I appreciate it.

I hope that I've helped some people by writing about this subject.


lindacee profile image

lindacee 4 years ago from Southern Arizona

Wow! Thanks for including the list of common medications that can cause phototoxic reactions. Antibiotics, I had heard about, but the others were a complete surprise. Good information. And thanks for sharing your experience.


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

Daisy, this is a very useful hub. It underlines the importance of reading the medicine labels thoroughly before taking them.

The table is a real help as well.

Thanks for sharing.

Voted up and across. Shared it all over.


StephanieBCrosby profile image

StephanieBCrosby 4 years ago from New Jersey

This was really informative. I could not wait to see what all could cause such a reaction. This gives new meaning to even what I wrote about in terms of medication. It can make diagnosing certain conditions even harder if one prescription is causing reactions that masquerade as others. Very useful and interesting.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda,

It's very nice to meet you. I have a long "to write" list, but as soon as I saw that the Weekly Topic Inspiration was "Background on the Medicines We Take," I had to stop researching some geography articles and write this Hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rajan,

Thanks for reading my article, commenting in it, and sharing it in several places. I appreciate your support very much.

One of the items in the phototoxic column in my table is the painkiller *naproxen*. (I can't take that medication because I'm allergic to it.)

What many people might not realize is that naproxen is a stronger version of the over-the-counter pain medication *Aleve*. I didn't do the research on it, but I wondering if the weaker medication Aleve can also cause phototoxicity.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Stephanie,

It's nice to meet you. A photosensitivity problem also makes treating other conditions difficult.

I was taking the doxycycline because I had a sinus infection, but the sinus infection couldn't be treated because of my phototoxic reaction to the doxycycline.


KDuBarry03 4 years ago

Wow, very important hub! This is useful information for anyone going to the beach so often (or even stepping into the sun at all and may obtain a reaction). Thank you so much for sharing!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Keith,

Thanks for reading and commenting in my Hub.

When I lived in New Jersey, I would have said that my article contained useful information for *anyone going to the beach*. Now that I live in Southern California, I would amend that statement to useful information for *anyone going outdoors during the daytime*.


QudsiaP1 profile image

QudsiaP1 4 years ago

When I was ill, a doctor prescribed me a mix of medicines because he could not decide why I was ill. As a result of his foolish experimentation, I had to suffer photosensitivity and phototoxity for 2 months until thank God I recovered.

It is good that you are educating people about this. Thank you. :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Qudsia,

Thanks for reading and commenting in my Hub. I'm sorry that you experienced photosensitivity reactions that lasted so long. Wouldn't it have been better if diagnostic tests had been done to determine the cause of your illness rather than just prescribe medications to treat the symptoms?


MarleneB profile image

MarleneB 4 years ago from Northern California, USA

Oh, what pain you had to endure. I am glad you are OK now. Thank you for the chart you provided. I was particularly amazed to see sunscreen on the photoallergic side of the table. It goes to show that we can never be too safe.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

MarleneB,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading and commenting in my Hub. I hope by my discussing what happened to me, I will have helped other people avoid the same reaction that I had.

It sounds like with sunscreens that reading the label is just as important as reading the warnings on prescription medicine bottles.


Doc Sonic profile image

Doc Sonic 4 years ago from Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Daisy, what a terrible experience that must've been. Fortunately the pharmacist was on the ball! Thanks for the reminder that we really do need to read the warnings, even on OTC drugs. Voted up and useful.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Glen,

Thanks reading and commenting in another of my Hubs. I don't know how much training pharmacists get in recognizing reactions such as photosensitivity. I'm wondering if the pharmacist made it his business to become familiar with medical-related things that could happen to tourists while they were visiting his city.


Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 4 years ago from San Francisco

Oh goody- yet ANOTHER thing to worry about when it comes to sun exposure! Hahaa. Seriously though- phototoxic reactions sound awful! Thanks for getting me up to speed on the subject.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Simone,

Thanks for reading my Hub and commenting in it. I'm glad I took a break from my craft "how-to" and geography Hubs to write the article. The topic is important, but I don't think it gets enough press.


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 4 years ago from North Carolina

What a great hub, Daisy. Very timely points. I'm in FL vacationing right now and was cautious in the sunlight because of the very problem you described here. I stayed mostly in the shade and then briefly out in the water and sun; then back into the condo. My son in law was ill that night with bright red skin and we all thought it was sunburn, but reading this has given me new thoughts about it, which I plan to discuss with him. I know he is on a number of medications as well, and I'm suspecting this was not ordinary sunburn. Thanks for sharing.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Denise,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it.

Please have your son-in-law read the labels on all of his medications. I'm not a physician, but it sounds like his bright read skin is not a sunburn. It sounds like he's expereinced a phototoxic reaction and should stay completely out of the sun.


Docmo profile image

Docmo 4 years ago from UK

I a,ways shiver internally whe a helpful medical article appears online - this is because people rarely get the full picture I am delighted Daisy that you not only got the facts right but also included a very helpful list of drugs to think about in this super useful hub. Well done and voted up/ useful!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Doctor Mohan Kumar (Docmo),

I am honored that a member of the medical profession took the time to read and comment in my article.

I am thrilled at what you had to say.

There was a Weekly Topic Inspiration (WTI) a few weeks ago regarding the medications we take. As soon as I saw the topic, I knew I had to write this article. I was a bit nervous about writing this Hub, since I am not licensed to practice medicine, but I thought that if I wrote from the viewpoint of my personal experience, I would be OK.

Thank you for your continued support, my friend.


ChristyWrites profile image

ChristyWrites 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Thank-you for listing the medications that can cause this. Well done and informative Daisy. I vote up and will share too in order to educate others.


lovedoctor926 4 years ago

This is useful information. Thank you for spreading awareness. It's good to know that you caught this on time. Nice to meet you Daisy.


whonunuwho profile image

whonunuwho 4 years ago from United States

Thanks for the very informative hub and possibly one that can help prevent a lot of suffering.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Christy,

It's good to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my Hub, commenting in it, and sharing it on Google+. I appreciate your continued support.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

lovedoctor926,

It's nice to meet you, too. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I appreciate your very kind words.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

whonunuwho,

It's nice to meet you. Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. It would be wonderful if by reading my Hub someone didn't experience the phototoxic reaction that I did.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi Daisy, this is such a great help, but I am sorry to see you had to suffer to find out! I must admit that today, as it was in the 90s over here I did wonder if my skin was going to burn as my arms are really sensitive to the sun, but never thought of the medication. I use ventolin inhaler and thyroid meds so hopefully they are fine, thanks nell


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nell,

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my Hubs. I'm glad to hear you're finally having good weather in England. If you're sensitive to the sun, it might be a good idea to check if it's OK to be out in the sun with the meds you're taking.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

I can only echo those that went before me; excellent, useful, informative. We humans are a stubborn breed and seem to have to learn the hard way. Thanks to you this is one lesson we won't have to learn the hard way since you did it for us!

Voted up, useful, and interesting.


Melovy profile image

Melovy 4 years ago from UK

Daisy this is a very useful hub. I didn't know so many medicines could cause these reactions. I guess with hay fever being so prevalent in summer people need to be extra careful.

I have only glanced through the comments so someone else may have mentioned this, but did you know that the herb St John's Wort (effective for depression) also causes photosensitivity?

Great hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mary (tillsontitan),

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. I'm glad that my sharing what happened to me might result in others not suffering like I did.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Yvonne (Melovy),

Thanks for reading and commenting in my Hub. I appreciate your adding the information about St. John's Wort. I had known that it causes adverse reactions when combined in one's system with some other herbs and medications, but I had not known that it causes photosensitivity.


Alecia Murphy profile image

Alecia Murphy 4 years ago from Wilmington, North Carolina

Not enough doctors emphasize side effects to me. They say- this should help but don't go beyond that. So essentially you have to do your own homework.

Thanks so much for sharing such valuable information-I'll be sure to check for this on my medicine.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Alecia,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. I was fortunate that I encountered a very knowledgeable pharmacist, even though it was after the fact.


Stephanie Henkel profile image

Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

This is an important reminder to anyone taking any kind of medication! We do need to be aware of side effects, and, as you pointed out, photosensitivity can take us unaware. Great hub!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Stephanie,

Thanks for reading my article and adding your comment. I learned my lesson after this unpleasant experience. I always read the precautions on the prescription labels now, even when I have a prescription refilled.


Mike Robbers profile image

Mike Robbers 4 years ago from London

I almost daily stay exposed in the sun because of the vitamin D benefits offered, not more though than 15 to 20 min. Sun is lovely and healthy but evil and dangerous as well.. we should always be aware of that.

Thanks for your important information and I'm really sorry you had to endure such pain,, so nice you are ok now.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mike,

Thanks for reading my article and commenting. I appreciate your very kind words.

My primary care physician (GP) has suggested I take a vitamin D supplement every day. She says that many people are lacking in the minimum daily requirement for vitamin D.


rasta1 profile image

rasta1 3 years ago from Jamaica

Very nice assessment. A very nice heads up for those taking medication and would like to go to the beach.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Art (rasta1),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I appreciate your very kind words.

I hope readers are helped by the information I've provided. Phototoxic reactions are an unpleasant experience.


Sherry Hewins profile image

Sherry Hewins 3 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

I had a similar experience when a medication I was taking made me unable to sweat. I was sitting in the sun at a music festival on a very hot day. I got a terrible headache, I just knew I needed to get out of the sun, I had to lie in the shade for a couple of hours before I felt better. I didn't realize what happened until weeks later. My doctor had given me samples of the medicine and not warned me of the side effects.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Sherry,

Thanks for reading my article and sharing your anecdote. What a terrible experience that must have been at the music festival!

I learned my lesson after the photosensitivity reaction. Whenever I get a new or a refill of a prescription medication or a new bottle of an over-the-counter pill, I read the label.


Vellur profile image

Vellur 3 years ago from Dubai

I never knew about this, thank you for sharing this information. Great hub, voted up.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nithya (Vellur),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for sharing my Hub.

I didn't know about phototoxic reactions to the sun until I experienced one. It wasn't a pleasant experience at all.


vocalcoach profile image

vocalcoach 3 years ago from Nashville Tn.

What great information you've provided us with. I knew nothing about photosensitivity until reading your article here. I've a couple of dark spots on my face and I know what caused them now. I have one prescription warning me to avoid sunlight while taking it. Big thanks, Daisy/ shares.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Audrey (vocalcoach),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. I'm glad the information in my Hub has helped you.

Whenever I am prescribed a "new" medication, I read all the accompanying literature. When I experienced the reaction to the sun which I described in my article, it felt as though I had been scalded with boiling water. I wouldn't wish the experience on anyone.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

Medications have so many side effects that they print out pages and pages of warnings. It's scary. So sorry you had this reaction to the photosensitive meds. Not a good day at the beach.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Peg (PegCole17),

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. We used to just see warning labels on prescription bottles, but, as you mentioned, it's now several pages of information.

I try to avoid taking "new" prescription medications. I have allergies to so many medications, I never know what's going to happen when I take something that's never before been prescribed for me.


Stephanie Henkel profile image

Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

Great hub and worth revisiting as a reminder to always know the side effects of medications we are taking.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Stephanie,

Thanks for reading my article another time and adding your comment. Whenever I'm prescribed a medication which I haven't taken previously, I read the accompanying literature in addition to the warning labels on the medicine bottle.

Living in Southern California, it's difficult for me avoid being outdoors in sunny weather. There's a lake a little over a mile from our house with a sand beach and other amenities. I always bring a beach umbrella which clamps onto the arm of my beach chair. It's a great help in preventing me from becoming sunburned.


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

Very useful and informative hub!

I am extra--extra careful when a medicine is prescribed to me. Because I have had my share of medicine allergies. And these allergies are so stubborn that it becomes very difficult to treat them.

You have done a great job by spreading awareness in this regard. Thanks!

Voted up and tweeted!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 2 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Chitrangada,

Thanks for reading my article and posting your comment. Thanks, too, for tweeting my Hub.

I read the literature which accompanies every medication I am prescribed. For some, I go online and do further research. One cannot be too careful in this regard.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working