Preventive Steps For Male

Men's Health Schedule

Preventive Steps to Start Your Child on a Long and Healthy Life

Birth to Age 6 (male)

  • Keep all recommended well-child visits.
  • Have your child receive all childhood vaccines and keep a record of them.
  • Limit the amount of fat and cholesterol intake and emphasize grains, fruits, and vegetables in meals given to children two and older.
  • Breastfeed if you can. If not, use iron-enriched formulas and foods for infants and toddlers.
  • Lie infant on his/her back for sleeping.
  • Avoid tooth decay - don't put infants to bed with a bottle.
  • Make regular dental visits. Children should see a dentist either within six months after their first tooth emerges through the gum (usually at six to eight months) or by their first birthday. Floss and use fluoride toothpaste daily. Check with your dentist or doctor about the need for additional fluoride and vitamins.
  • If you smoke, quit smoking for your child's health. Exposure to passive smoke is harmful.
  • Always use safety car seats in the back seat for children under five and lap/shoulder belts for children over five years. Selection of appropriate seat is dependent on child's weight.
  • Install and maintain smoke detectors in your home.
  • Use flame-retardant sleepwear.
  • Make sure water heater temperature is set below 120° to 130º degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Keep the poison control number on hand for accidental poisoning.
  • Store drugs, toxic substances, firearms and matches safely.
  • Install guards for windows and stairs.
  • Surround your pool with a fence.
  • Keep emergency phone numbers by the phone.
  • Consider taking CPR training if you are a parent or caretaker.

Screening Recommendations:

Birth to Age 6 (male)

Below is a summary of preventive services recommendations for healthy children with normal risk. Talk with your doctor to find out what preventive services are right for your children and when they should have them. A full list of the most current screening recommendations can be found on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) website at  http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm .  Vaccine schedules change often.  The most current recommendations for vaccines can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at www.cdc.gov/vaccines. A catch-up vaccine schedule is also available at the CDC website for children who have fallen behind or started late.

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SCREENING TEST*

RECOMMENDATIONS

PKU, sickle cell hemoglobinopathies, hypothyroidism

Once--Newborns

Hearing

Once--Newborns before 1 month of age

Vision

Periodically-- 0-5 years of age

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Periodically-- 6-18 years of age

VACCINES**

RECOMMENDATIONS

Hepatitis B

3-4 Doses--1 dose at birth; 1 dose 1-2 months later; 1 dose at 4 months of age1; and 1 dose between 6-18 months of age

Hepatitis A

2 Doses-- 2 doses 6 months apart between 12-23 months of age

Rotavirus

2-3 Doses-- 1 dose each at age 2, 4, and 6 months of age1

Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP)

5 Doses-- 1 dose each at age 2, 4, and 6 months of age; 1 dose between 15-18 months of age; and 1 dose between 4-6 years of age

Inactivated Polio (IPV)

4 Doses-- 1 dose each at age 2 and 4 months of age; 1 dose between 6-18 months of age; and 1 dose between 4-6 years of age

H. Influenzae type b (Hib)

3-4 Doses-- 1 dose each at age 2, 4, and 6 months of age1; and 1 dose between 12-15 months of age

Pneumococcal Conjugate

4 Doses-- 1 dose each at age 2, 4, and 6 months of age; and 1 dose between 12-15 months of age

Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

2 Doses-- 1 dose between 12-15 months of age; and 1 dose between 4-6 years of age

Chicken pox (Varicella)

2 Doses-- 1 dose between 12-15 months of age; and 1 dose between 4-6 years of age

Influenza

Every flu season-- Beginning at 6 months of age2

*The preventive health screenings are based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) found online http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm as of 2/1/10.

**The vaccine recommendations are based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found online at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines as of 2/1/10.

1 Dependent on vaccine type.

2 All children younger than 9 years of age getting the vaccine for the first time should receive two doses. If only one dose was given in the first year, two doses should be given in the following year. Household/close contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children age 0-59 months and children who have high-risk conditions should also receive the influenza vaccine.

Preventive Steps to Start Your Child on a Long and Healthy Life

Ages 7 To 12 Years (male)

  • Keep all recommended well-child visits.
  • Have your child receive all adolescent vaccines and keep a record of them.
  • Avoid unintentional injuries in the home by making sure your home has smoke detectors and buying flame-retardant sleepwear for your children.
  • Make sure firearms are locked and safely stored away.
  • Consider taking CPR training, if you are a parent or caretaker.
  • Pay attention to speed limits and never drink and drive, for your child's sake, as well as your own.
  • Teach your child to avoid bicycling near traffic.
  • Make sure your child always wears a helmet when bicycling, rollerblading or riding a scooter or all-terrain vehicle (ATV).
  • Limit the amount of fat and cholesterol in family meals and use lots of grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Make regular dental visits; floss and use fluoride toothpaste daily. Check with your dentist or doctor about the need for additional fluoride and vitamins.
  • Encourage your children to engage in regular physical activities.
  • Teach your children about the danger of smoking, and if you smoke, improve your health and set a good example for your children by quitting.

Screening Recommendations:

Ages 7 to 12 Years (male)

Below is a summary of preventive services recommendations for healthy children with normal risk. Talk with your doctor to find out what preventive services are right for your children and when they should have them.  A full list of the most current screening recommendations can be found on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) website at  http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm .  Vaccine schedules change often. The most current recommendations for vaccines can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at www.cdc.gov/vaccinesRoutine childhood vaccines should be completed by this age.  A catch-up vaccine schedule is also available at the CDC website for children who have fallen behind or started late.

SCREENINGS*

RECOMMENDATIONS

Depression

Routinely---12-18 years of age

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Periodically-- 6-18 years of age

VACCINES**

RECOMMENDATIONS

Tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis (Tdap)

1 Dose-- 1 dose between 11-12 years of age if the childhood DTP/DTaP series is complete and the child has not received the Td booster dose

Meningococcal

1 Dose-- 1 dose between 11-12 years of age

Influenza

Every flu season-- Beginning at 6 months of age1

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

3 Doses-- First dose between 11-12 years of age; second dose 2 months later; third dose 6 months after the first dose2

*The preventive health screenings are based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) found online http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm as of 2/1/10.

**The vaccine recommendations are based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found online at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines as of 2/1/10.

1 All children younger than 9 years of age getting the vaccine for the first time should receive two doses.  If only one dose was given in the first year, two doses should be given in the following year. Household/close contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children age 0-59 months and children who have high-risk conditions should also receive the influenza vaccine.

2 Boys age 11-26 may also be vaccinated with one of the HPV vaccines (Gardisil) to reduce their likelihood of getting genital warts.

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

  • Keep all recommended well-child visits.
  • Have your child receive all adolescent vaccines and keep a record of them.
  • Limit the amount of fat and cholesterol in family meals and use lots of grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Encourage your children to engage in regular physical activities.
  • Make regular dental visits; floss and use fluoride toothpaste daily. Check with your dentist or doctor about the need for additional fluoride and vitamins.
  • Don't smoke. If you do, quit.
  • Avoid alcohol and illegal drugs.
  • Never drink and drive.
  • Pay attention to speed limits.
  • Encourage open and frank discussions regarding sexual activity.
  • Always wear lap and shoulder belts when driving or riding in a motor vehicle.
  • Always wear a helmet when rollerblading, or riding a bicycle, scooter, motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle (ATV).
  • Make sure firearms are locked and safely stored away.
  • Make sure smoke detectors are installed and maintained in your home.
  • Consider taking CPR training, if you are a parent or caretaker.

Screening Recommendations:

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

Below is a summary of preventive services recommendations for healthy children with normal risk. Talk with your doctor to find out what preventive services are right for your children and when they should have them. A full list of the most current screening recommendations can be found on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) website at  http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm . Vaccine schedules change often.  The most current recommendations for vaccines can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at www.cdc.gov/vaccinesRoutine childhood and adolescent vaccines should be completed by this age.  A catch-up vaccine schedule is also available at the CDC website for children who have fallen behind or started late.

SCREENING TESTS*

RECOMMENDATIONS

Blood Pressure

Every 2 years-- 18 years of age and older

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Periodically-- 6-18 years of age

Alcohol Misuse

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

Depression

Routinely-- 12-18 years of age

Tobacco Use

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

VACCINES**

RECOMMENDATIONS

Influenza

Every flu season-- Beginning 6 months of age through 18 years of age1

*The preventive health screenings are based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) found online http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm as of 2/1/10.

**The vaccine recommendations are based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found online at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines as of 2/1/10.

1 Household/close contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children age 0-59 months and children who have high-risk conditions should also receive the influenza immunization.

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

  • Keep all recommended well-child visits.
  • Have your child receive all adolescent vaccines and keep a record of them.
  • Limit the amount of fat and cholesterol in family meals and use lots of grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Encourage your children to engage in regular physical activities.
  • Make regular dental visits; floss and use fluoride toothpaste daily. Check with your dentist or doctor about the need for additional fluoride and vitamins.
  • Don't smoke. If you do, quit.
  • Avoid alcohol and illegal drugs.
  • Never drink and drive.
  • Pay attention to speed limits.
  • Encourage open and frank discussions regarding sexual activity.
  • Always wear lap and shoulder belts when driving or riding in a motor vehicle.
  • Always wear a helmet when rollerblading, or riding a bicycle, scooter, motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle (ATV).
  • Make sure firearms are locked and safely stored away.
  • Make sure smoke detectors are installed and maintained in your home.
  • Consider taking CPR training, if you are a parent or caretaker.

Screening Recommendations:

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

Below is a summary of preventive services recommendations for healthy children with normal risk. Talk with your doctor to find out what preventive services are right for your children and when they should have them. A full list of the most current screening recommendations can be found on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) website at  http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm . Vaccine schedules change often.  The most current recommendations for vaccines can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at www.cdc.gov/vaccinesRoutine childhood and adolescent vaccines should be completed by this age.  A catch-up vaccine schedule is also available at the CDC website for children who have fallen behind or started late.

SCREENING TESTS*

RECOMMENDATIONS

Blood Pressure

Every 2 years-- 18 years of age and older

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Periodically-- 6-18 years of age

Alcohol Misuse

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

Depression

Routinely-- 12-18 years of age

Tobacco Use

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

VACCINES**

RECOMMENDATIONS

Influenza

Every flu season-- Beginning 6 months of age through 18 years of age1

*The preventive health screenings are based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) found online http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm as of 2/1/10.

**The vaccine recommendations are based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found online at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines as of 2/1/10.

1 Household/close contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children age 0-59 months and children who have high-risk conditions should also receive the influenza immunization.

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

  • Keep all recommended well-child visits.
  • Have your child receive all adolescent vaccines and keep a record of them.
  • Limit the amount of fat and cholesterol in family meals and use lots of grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Encourage your children to engage in regular physical activities.
  • Make regular dental visits; floss and use fluoride toothpaste daily. Check with your dentist or doctor about the need for additional fluoride and vitamins.
  • Don't smoke. If you do, quit.
  • Avoid alcohol and illegal drugs.
  • Never drink and drive.
  • Pay attention to speed limits.
  • Encourage open and frank discussions regarding sexual activity.
  • Always wear lap and shoulder belts when driving or riding in a motor vehicle.
  • Always wear a helmet when rollerblading, or riding a bicycle, scooter, motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle (ATV).
  • Make sure firearms are locked and safely stored away.
  • Make sure smoke detectors are installed and maintained in your home.
  • Consider taking CPR training, if you are a parent or caretaker.

Screening Recommendations:

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

Below is a summary of preventive services recommendations for healthy children with normal risk. Talk with your doctor to find out what preventive services are right for your children and when they should have them. A full list of the most current screening recommendations can be found on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) website at  http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm . Vaccine schedules change often.  The most current recommendations for vaccines can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at www.cdc.gov/vaccinesRoutine childhood and adolescent vaccines should be completed by this age.  A catch-up vaccine schedule is also available at the CDC website for children who have fallen behind or started late.

SCREENING TESTS*

RECOMMENDATIONS

Blood Pressure

Every 2 years-- 18 years of age and older

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Periodically-- 6-18 years of age

Alcohol Misuse

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

Depression

Routinely-- 12-18 years of age

Tobacco Use

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

VACCINES**

RECOMMENDATIONS

Influenza

Every flu season-- Beginning 6 months of age through 18 years of age1

*The preventive health screenings are based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) found online http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm as of 2/1/10.

**The vaccine recommendations are based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found online at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines as of 2/1/10.

1 Household/close contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children age 0-59 months and children who have high-risk conditions should also receive the influenza immunization.

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

  • Keep all recommended well-child visits.
  • Have your child receive all adolescent vaccines and keep a record of them.
  • Limit the amount of fat and cholesterol in family meals and use lots of grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Encourage your children to engage in regular physical activities.
  • Make regular dental visits; floss and use fluoride toothpaste daily. Check with your dentist or doctor about the need for additional fluoride and vitamins.
  • Don't smoke. If you do, quit.
  • Avoid alcohol and illegal drugs.
  • Never drink and drive.
  • Pay attention to speed limits.
  • Encourage open and frank discussions regarding sexual activity.
  • Always wear lap and shoulder belts when driving or riding in a motor vehicle.
  • Always wear a helmet when rollerblading, or riding a bicycle, scooter, motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle (ATV).
  • Make sure firearms are locked and safely stored away.
  • Make sure smoke detectors are installed and maintained in your home.
  • Consider taking CPR training, if you are a parent or caretaker.

Screening Recommendations:

Ages 13 to 18 Years (male)

Below is a summary of preventive services recommendations for healthy children with normal risk. Talk with your doctor to find out what preventive services are right for your children and when they should have them. A full list of the most current screening recommendations can be found on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) website at  http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm . Vaccine schedules change often.  The most current recommendations for vaccines can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at www.cdc.gov/vaccinesRoutine childhood and adolescent vaccines should be completed by this age.  A catch-up vaccine schedule is also available at the CDC website for children who have fallen behind or started late.

SCREENING TESTS*

RECOMMENDATIONS

Blood Pressure

Every 2 years-- 18 years of age and older

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Periodically-- 6-18 years of age

Alcohol Misuse

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

Depression

Routinely-- 12-18 years of age

Tobacco Use

Routinely-- 18 years of age and older

VACCINES**

RECOMMENDATIONS

Influenza

Every flu season-- Beginning 6 months of age through 18 years of age1

*The preventive health screenings are based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) found online http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfix.htm as of 2/1/10.

**The vaccine recommendations are based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found online at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines as of 2/1/10.

1 Household/close contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children age 0-59 months and children who have high-risk conditions should also receive the influenza immunization.

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