Can You Take Suboxone? You Must Be Opiate Dependent to Use Buprenorphine – Take This Opiate Addiction Self Test

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Suboxone (buprenorphine) is a relatively new drug used in the treatment of opiate addiction. It is used as a substitute for a drug of abuse (much like methadone is) and allows an addicted person to withdraw gradually off of opiates without feeling any (or much less) detox pains.

Suboxone is not for everyone, and there are certain groups of people, such as alcoholics, benzodiazepine users, pregnant women etc. that may not be viable candidates for the medication. Most fundamentally though, to be a suitable candidate for Suboxone you must be opiate dependent – that is, you must be "addicted" to opiates (drugs like heroin, morphine, oxycodone, oxycontin etc.).

Suboxone is given to non opiate dependent patients in some more rare instances, such as when previously addicted persons are released from prison, and are at risk for overdose.

Are You Addicted?

Before giving you Suboxone, your doctor will want to confirm that you are in fact dependent on opiates, and to assess this, she may use the assessment checklist of the American Psychiatric Association's DSM-IV.

The DSM-IV Checklist is simply a series of questions that clinicians can use as a diagnostic tool, and in this case, a score of three positive criteria or greater indicates opiate dependence, and makes a patient a possibly appropriate candidate for buprenorphine treatment (Suboxone or Subutex).

Take this modified version of the DSM-IV for yourself, and see if you meet the criteria for opiate dependence.

Opiate Dependence Self Test

  1. Does the user show a tolerance, either by needing ever greater amounts to get high, or by experiencing ever diminishing effects from a same dosage?
  2. Does the user experience withdrawal symptoms when she stops taking opiates, or does she take an opiate or similar type of drug to avoid feeling the pains of withdrawal?
  3. Does the user use the drug for longer, or in greater amounts than she had intended on using?
  4. Does the user want persistently to cut down, or has he tried, and been unable to do so?
  5. Does the user devote a lot of time and energy to getting the drug, or to recovering from its use?
  6. Has the user stopped or lessened participation in previously important social, recreational or occupational activities because of their drug usage?
  7. Does the user continue to use even though she knows the harm that her use is causing to her?

Three or more yes answers indicate opiate dependence, and makes the person a potentially suitable candidate for opiate replacement therapy with Suboxone.

Some people will not find acceptable symptoms relief from buprenorphine. People who have been using opiates very heavily may need to use the much stronger medication called methadone, at least to start off with. Your doctor will be able to advise you on which medication is best for you and be able to answer any questions that you may have about opiate replacement therapy.

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Comments 5 comments

diane chess 7 years ago

i have been on methadone for 15yrs. i tried detoxing about iyr. ago i dropped img every 6wks. , got down to 30mgs. and i thought i had punemonia on and off for about 5wks. realized i was not able to detox, ever! my reason fpr wanting to detox is due to the SEVERE SWEATING, and i only sweat when i walk briskly, etc, only when i move, if i sit on the bed reading for hours , never sweat a drop, however if i get up and change the bed, vacuum, i am dripping wet , seriously dripping, from the head mostly. am i alone w/ this problem, is there anything i can take for this awful awful problem,it is ruining my life and it happens if it is10 degrees out, the temp or clothing does not matter,help me!!!


diane chess 7 years ago

i have been on methadone for 15yrs. i tried detoxing about iyr. ago i dropped img every 6wks. , got down to 30mgs. and i thought i had punemonia on and off for about 5wks. realized i was not able to detox, ever! my reason fpr wanting to detox is due to the SEVERE SWEATING, and i only sweat when i walk briskly, etc, only when i move, if i sit on the bed reading for hours , never sweat a drop, however if i get up and change the bed, vacuum, i am dripping wet , seriously dripping, from the head mostly. am i alone w/ this problem, is there anything i can take for this awful awful problem,it is ruining my life and it happens if it is10 degrees out, the temp or clothing does not matter,help me!!!


screwed 5 years ago

how do i take suboxon without the wicked withdrawels,woke up yesterday normally its time for a shot,so i did 4mgs and holy shit lookout wanted to run around the yard like a turky crazy arms n legs an everything else how long do i wait so it wont happen again


Barb 4 years ago

The suboxone zone will go away in about 2 weeks. I always feel positive and motivated from this drug so it is better than sleeping and nodding and getting sick. I think it is a miracle pill and unfortunatly so do the makers. heroin is much cheaper so motivation to stay clean is the key GOOD LUCK Peace


Ian D. Samson 3 years ago

I am not opiate-dependent yet I have intractable/refractory chronic neuropathic pain of unknown aetiology, treatment with Buprenorphine 5mcg/h plus Gabapentin (Nurontin) 200mg nocte. Not as effective as FENTANYL 25mcg/h but less expensive and longer lasting. History of no dependencies apart from tobacco. Other research finds Cannabis Indica in any dosage very effective in alleviation of chronic neuropathic pain but it remains illegal in South Africa.

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