How Potassium Can Kill

File:Potassium-sulfide-unit-cell-3D-ionic.png
File:Potassium-sulfide-unit-cell-3D-ionic.png | Source

Potassium is a Mineral

All that it does.


Potassium is a mineral that helps in a healthy fluid balance of our body. Also it plays an important part in making sure our nerves and muscles work as they should. Potassium is very important for the normal working of the muscles, heart, and nerves. Then too it is an important part in controlling activity of smooth muscle; along with skeletal and cardiac muscle. Smooth being one of the kinds of muscle tissue in the body and as a rule forms the supporting tissue of blood vessels and containing internal organs, such as stomach, intestine, and bladder. This muscle; considered smooth because it does not have the microscopic look seen in the other two types of muscle. Smooth and skeletal muscle are muscles of the extremities and body along with muscles of the heart; important too, for regular transmissions of electrical signals throughout the nervous system.


Acesulfame potassium
Acesulfame potassium | Source

Another Silent Killer

How many has it claimed unknown to anyone?

How many times has potassium killed without being named? It could be very many. You usually hear of low potassium and so many people without thinking they could be committing suicide with high potassium start stuffing in those bananas and anything high in potassium without a thought!

Causes

Small glands located next to the kidneys, and important in secreting hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone are adrenal gland. Aldosterone causes the kidneys to hold sodium and fluid while ridding potassium through the urine. So then diseases of the adrenal gland, such as Addison’s disease, that leads to lowered aldosterone secretion that can lower kidney excretion of potassium, causing the body to collect and hold potassium; causing hyperkalemia.

Extremely high levels of potassium in the blood (severe hyperkalemia) can lead to heart attack and death. High potassium can cause hyperkalemia and when not recognized and treated properly, severe hyperkalemia can result in a mortality rate of about 67%! High potassium kills.

Not once in all these years did I hear of high potassium being a danger. I only had blood work done once or twice a year, and no one ever called me on it except about my cholesterol high once so I took care of that. I always try natural and generally it does work. If someone does not tell you anything though, how can you know?

I have had a horrible past few years trying to get my blood pressure under control and even though I had an allergic reaction to the main blood pressure medicine I am now on, I was able to take it going off all and taking this in half doses twice a day.

Still it was not low enough and I was sent to a heart specialist who put me on a medicine that was a little scarier than most but I only took half the dosage until I saw how it would affect me. It went pretty low although there were just some times it went up again and never to the highs I had been looking at for years.


Bananas good or bad? Isn't this one of our favorite ways to get potassium? If your potassium is too high you want to avoid them!
Bananas good or bad? Isn't this one of our favorite ways to get potassium? If your potassium is too high you want to avoid them! | Source

Always Read the Side Effects

One man's medicine is another man's poison.

High Potassium

Were you already aware of high potassium and the risk of it?

See results without voting

At the pharmacy one day I asked the pharmacist if I could take something over the counter and showed her the two medicines I was taking and she said that would be fine, she would be more concerned with the two blood pressure medicines I was taking together, she said. That was a little scary and my first hint I had anything to worry about.

I knew I couldn’t go confront this heart specialist with this because for one thing doctors do not like pharmacists giving us advice or telling us anything for that matter. I had another heart specialist almost have a fit when he asked me did I think pharmacist knew more about medicines than a doctor and I said yes. He often tried to get me to say different but I would not do it because I know these people only study medicine and know their stuff. I also know little salesmen run in and out of doctor’s offices with their medicines and something is happening here that I think equals lobbying.

"A wise man should consider that health is the greatest of human blessings, and learn how by his own thought to derive benefit from his illnesses."

— Hippocrates

Which fruits should you eat when potassium is high?

Choose fruit low in potassium when you are in danger of high.
Choose fruit low in potassium when you are in danger of high. | Source

Don't Be Afraid to Talk to Your Doctor!

It is your life and definitely your business.

The normal blood potassium reading should be between 3.7 to 5.2 milliequivalents. Levels above 6 milliequivalents and those below 3 milliequivalents are said to be dangerous. People though suffering from chronic kidney disease will not be able to excrete excess potassium from the body due to the malfunction of the kidney; resulting in excess levels of blood potassium leading to a condition known as hyperkalemia. Hyperkalemia means an abnormally elevated level of potassium in the blood. Danger of developing hyperkalemia can be greatly reduced by being on a low potassium diet. I came to this conclusion and plan on my own and I should not have had to.

Don't wait until it is too late

Massive tissue destruction can result in elevated levels of blood potassium as the damaged cells release potassium; trauma, burns, surgical procedures, destruction of tumor cells or red blood cells, and diabetic ketoacidosis can cause this release, among other things. Symptoms of hyperkalemia are nausea, fatigue, muscle weakness and tingling sensation.

Symptoms of hyperkalemia are not easy to recognize until the potassium level in blood rises to very high levels. At higher levels there is the possibility of dangerous complications developing leading to irregular heart rhythm, severe weakness of the muscles and even paralysis; and can be very dangerous.

My guess would be most people suffer from potassium being too low but you should find out about medicines that not only rob you of potassium but those that may kill you causing it to raise too high.

There is not a lot known about this and I would guess many deaths could have very easily been caused by this with no one ever the wiser.

Just dead from heart attack and no clue it could have easily been prevented!

Heart to heart

So when I saw my heart specialist again I asked him about the new medicine and he said well the main danger of this new medicine was running your potassium high and that my blood work from my regular doctor showed my potassium to be very low so it seemed safe to try.

Now wouldn’t it have been nice if he had mentioned a diet to me then and wouldn’t it have been nice if someone had told me even months ago my potassium was low? I asked them about this at my regular doctors office and that last blood work had been done close to a year ago!

Of course in the mean time the heart specialist had decided to check it I suppose with me questioning and it was in the middle of acceptable numbers. I am assuming though because he saw my potassium was so low before this that I would be a good candidate to try this medicine that was not a necessary popular one but it may be the only one to save my life. I need to keep my potassium low now and I also need to keep it checked. No doctor told me this; I had to figure it out on my own. I could have had a stroke and died and do you think the word potassium would have ever been said? Of course not.

May Be Fatal if Left Untreated.

Can start small and get out of control.

Leave none untreated

Hyperkalemic paralysis inherited but rare disorder

  • Hyperkalemic paralysis is an inherited but rare disorder where patients can develop a quick onset of hyperkalemia which in turn causes muscle paralysis. An effect of hyperkalemia is interference with functioning of the skeletal muscles. The reason for the muscle paralysis is known but it is thought to be due to hyperkalemia suppressing the electrical activity of the muscle.

All hyperkalemia conditions should be treated

  • Most patients with problems have mild hyperkalemia yet any condition causing even mild hyperkalemia should be treated to stop hyperkalemia from becoming more severe. Very high levels of potassium in the blood known as severe hyperkalemia; can cause heart attack and death. When not caught and treated properly, severe hyperkalemia results in a death rate of a 67%.

  • According to the information above you want to be alerted at mid levels to put a stop to your rising potassium but at this point it would probably be safe enough for you to take care of this yourself if possible by knowing what is making it high if it is something you are taking as I mentioned in part one.
  • This can be medicines that you may be able to change or if your numbers are not too very high possible a close watch of your diet will bring your numbers down. I would like to make special mention here that although mild hyperkalemia is common with these medications, severe hyperkalemia usually do not occur unless these medications are given to patients with kidney dysfunction. So if you take a medicine that can raise potassium be sure you have no kidney problem and start a diet beneficial to kidneys. Personally though I did take a medicine like that I soon got off it when it ran my numbers up. I was put on a blood pressure medicine that did not have this risk and it worked fine and still is. I still want my potassium checked about every three months though and more often if it is up any.
  • Normal levels in the blood is 3.5-5.0. - 3.6 to 4.8 in some reports. Levels between 5.1 to 6.0 reflect mild hyperkalemia. Levels of 6.1 to 7.0 are moderate hyperkalemia, and levels above 7 are severe hyperkalemia.
  • Regular testing will let you know if you are managing to lower it or if it needs more serious treatment

Never just assume potassium fruits are for you. Bananas is not always a good idea!
Never just assume potassium fruits are for you. Bananas is not always a good idea! | Source

Know Your Numbers!

Never assume.

Potassium

Can be fatal

  • Regular blood levels of potassium are vital for keeping normal heart electrical rhythm. Low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia) and high blood potassium levels (hyperkalemia) can cause irregular heartbeats. The number one effect of hyperkalemia is related to electrical rhythm of the heart. As mild hyperkalemia probably has a small effect on the heart, moderate hyperkalemia can produce EKG changes and severe hyperkalemia can cause containment of electrical activity of the heart and can stop the beating of the heart.

Whole grain breads and other products helping in the risk of heart disease are not for the ones in danger of high potassium. Whole grain products have more potassium than refined grains like white flour. High amounts of potassium can considerably increase the risk of life threatening complications. What you think you are doing best for your health could kill you!

Get to know your blood reading in all things and what you should do about it. Blood should be checked no less than every twelve weeks when this is in question and the cardiologist think if the readings are good that is often enough. Of course if they aren’t then you need to be discussing that with your doctor. Probably you don’t want to go very long and you want to give immediate attention to raise or lower potassium, whichever you need. Call and check on all blood works if there is a special concern or you are having health problems or unusual symptoms. It is your body, the blood tests are not free and a good doctor should always go over tests with each patient.

If you have high or low; make a list of the foods you personally need and keep on your fridge door until you are pretty sure you have it down pat; the foods to help you that will probably not change unless you change medications.

This is a further needed step in the values of what we consume. Perhaps a little known life-saving step. It has not been an easy research but I think finally I can feel good about getting on a diet to keep my potassium from causing a heart attack. Please make sure you have neither problem. It is your right and could save your life.

Acesulfame Potassium
Acesulfame Potassium | Source

Possible Treatment for Hyperkalemia

Treat the cause

Address the cause. Keep your blood work times and results on a calendar with plenty of writing room. Make sure when you are medicines or have any health problems to have blood works that you need to know about and know right where to go to find records of every reading and what it is for, in this case of course; potassium. If your numbers are rising there is a reason and it is your doctors place to find the cause. If he doesn’t and does not show concern, find a new doctor.Heart and kidneys are things we do not want to chance! Hyperkalemia effects both. Know your numbers!

  • For mild cases a diet low in potassium may do the trick
  • Other Treatments
  • Stop medications that increase blood potassium levels. This can be your blood pressure medication as it was with me and many others I have read about, some with serious outcomes. This should be gone over with your doctor though because you cannot simply give up your medicines and there is always a process. If you don't get satisfaction, get a new doctor! I cannot stress that enough. It is your body and doctors are not all the same.
  • Giving glucose and insulin, (Intravenous) which advances movement of potassium from the extracellular space back into the cells.
  • Giving Intravenous calcium to provisionally protect the heart and muscles from the effects of hyperkalemia.
  • Sodium bicarbonate control to counteract acidosis and help movement of potassium from the extracellular space back into the cells.
  • Administration of diuretic to decrease the potassium supplies through increasing potassium excretion in the urine. It is important to note that most diuretics increase kidney excretion of potassium. Only the potassium-sparing diuretics mentioned above decrease kidney excretion of potassium.

Sources

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperkalemia

http://www.medicinenet.com/hyperkalemia/article.htm

More by this Author


Comments 78 comments

WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

A very thoughtful and informative Hub. Good work. Jackie!


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

Very well informed and so useful; A great hub and one to vote up without a doubt.

Take care and enjoy your day.

Eddy.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

WillStarr, thank you so much for reading and commenting! Glad you liked it!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Really ,it is so much more serious than most of us know! I will not eat bananas anymore until I know my potassium is out of danger for good, which to me means changing my diet around until I can work myself off that medicine and I have come down on it some, but still with blood work only every three months much can happen. I am doing a follow up to tell more.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Eiddwen, I think it is very important really and I do think this has probably caused many deaths unbeknown!

You take care too and good day back at ya!


Tams R profile image

Tams R 4 years ago from Missouri

I always knew taking too many potassium supplements could kill you, but I never knew the rest of this information. Thanks for increasing my awareness.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Tams, I have more written to publish real soon I think will be a big help.


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Wow, I was never aware of this before reading your hub. Thanks for getting this information out there.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

Extremely helpful hub Jackie! Very detailed! A friend of mine had an issue with low potassium levels and her life become a nightmare for a short while. She's better now. Wishing you good health:))


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thanks Susan, I believe it is a little known very important issue and I hope to make many aware.

Sunshine, I have more information to release soon and it seems the high might be the most dangerous and least known about.


Vinaya Ghimire profile image

Vinaya Ghimire 4 years ago from Nepal

Thanks for sharing this informative article. I was not aware about potassium being silent killer.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thanks for reading Vinaya, I didn't either until very recently.


DonnaCosmato profile image

DonnaCosmato 4 years ago from USA

Wow, what an insightful hub on a serious subject! Thanks for alerting us on the inherent dangers of potassium.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Donna, I have a follow up I hope really will be a help to ones who do have this problem and it will also help ones with low knowing what to eat. I really do wonder how many thousands of people who had heart attacks had them related to this.


BRIAN SLATER profile image

BRIAN SLATER 4 years ago from Nottingham Uk

Useful info her Jackie- have bookmarked this one to read again. voted up :)


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Brian and I will have a follow up with more important information following.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas

Doctor's do need to take more care and be more forthcoming with information with us. Great hub with lots of useful info!


Alecia Murphy profile image

Alecia Murphy 4 years ago from Wilmington, North Carolina

I didn't know this but thank you for sharing this valuable information Jackie.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you homesteadbound, this was a real shocker for me.

Alecia- I was very aware of the low helping my mother with that but never had I been aware of high and really all the foods potassium is high in I am surprised anyone could have low. Thanks for commenting.


mljdgulley354 profile image

mljdgulley354 4 years ago

Jackie this is a very informative hub, especially for those who use alternative medications. My doctor told me I needed more potassium and I started having heart palpitations within 3 days. Luckily that was the only new thing I had ingested. It took a week after I quit taking potassium for me to feel better.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Wow so you are proof of what I am saying and so glad you told us! I have another potassium one I have ready to post today or tomorrow. I hope you will come back and tell more on it. I think most people are brushing it off and I really do wonder how many are in graves from high potassium. I have had the cramps and heart palpitations too which of course luckily I attributed to the new medication although I had no idea it raised potassium, but sometimes our body talks to us if we will listen. Thank you so much!


mljdgulley354 profile image

mljdgulley354 4 years ago

I will be on the lookout for your next hub. I have become very skeptical of doctors which is why I use alternative medicine. Through the years I have learned to listen to my body and pay attention to what I am eating or not eating enough of.


jhamann profile image

jhamann 4 years ago from Reno NV

I feel it is important that more people realize that Potassium and Sodium are silent killers and that most processed foods are full of way too much of both of these ingredients. Thank You. Jamie


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you jhamann, and I spent hours researching and studying for all those answers to help people prevent this but hubpages shut it down and threatened to close my account if I reprint it so I will have to put that elsewhere but I will have a link, I think it is very important or I would not have invested so much time on it.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 4 years ago from California

Wow--thank you Jackie! I need to look at this--as I am a banana lover


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Audrey, I had another one with the information I felt everyone needed but Hubpages thinks it is a repeat of this one and won't let me publish it, sorry. I can't see any way around it since I can't change what things are called. Thanks for reading though and I will get the other out somewhere with a link soon as I can!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi, this doesn't surprise me, sadly its one of those things that doctors 'forget' to mention. my brother was in hospital the other day with bad palpitations, they checked this and that, and it was only when I said, well, what about potassium, vitamin deficiency etc that they looked at me in surprise! talk about heal thyself! great info and very well timed, cheers nell


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Ah well I hope you will let us know and I am so glad you did mention it. All this was going on behind my back really and I had no idea. I am working my way off that medicine and of course I know better than to say here just how; not wanting to persuade anyone else in a direction that could be wrong for them but it seems to really be working. I am kind of amazed and so thankful!

Thanks for stopping by!


kelleyward 4 years ago

Very informative. Thanks for sharing your knowledge about potassium.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you kelleyward for reading and responding!


Vellur profile image

Vellur 4 years ago from Dubai

Very useful and interesting hub. I never knew about all this, thanks very much for sharing. Now I will check for Potassium levels and spread the word, you are a life saver indeed. Voted up.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you so much Vellur, I hope you will and tell them to learn their numbers for sure, we need to let the doctors know we are aware and expect attention on this!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Yes I mention here that medication or supplements are probably the cause but as with me on a medication to keep blood pressure under control I am forced to search ways to keep mine lower with foods until I can get off the medicine, which could be months yet. Therefore foods may be very important; the only thing I can do really. I would think a blood test might not show it to be as high as it is depending on fasting etc, before an appointment. Probably either way really but what is the sense in a test if it is totally ignored?


healthwealthmusic profile image

healthwealthmusic 4 years ago from Everywhere Online ~ Fingerlakes ~ Upstate New York

Thank you for sharing - I never heard of potassium being to high or that there is danger when it is. A good thing to know!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you for reading and I plan to talk this over with a pharmacist for maybe a clearer idea of how serious it may be. I certainly know I don't appreciate being kept in the dark and having to Ms Marble it myself, lol.


acaetnna profile image

acaetnna 4 years ago from Guildford

Oh my word this was a very scary read. I obviously need to be very careful about the amount of potassium I take. Thanks for the warning, brilliant hub. Voting up and pressing the appropriate buttons too.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Well you may not acaetna but everyone should know whether they run high, low or normal and go from there, thanks for reading.


Poetic Fool 4 years ago

Jackie, this is very interesting and useful info! Thanks for sharing it. I was recently chatting with a friend who had a problem with high serum potassium. It seems to be a more common problem than most people suspect. Your hub serves as a warning for people to get checked.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Rick, I had a personally bad experience with it and it can be fatal and I think in general people do know so little about it, always striving to raise their potassium when it could be suicide and I do believe after learning all I have it probably has been responsible for countless deaths simply listed as heart failure or heart attack! I wanted to do the part two and do have it done but Hp would not let me put it containing the same subject but I really should combine them and put them elsewhere, thank you for the reminder.


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland

Great hub and this will be very useful for any patients. I also congratulate you for sticking up for yourself with your doctor and asking questions. I say that because as a nurse I don't know how often I've told patients not to be afraid to ask the doctors anything they don't understand or if they are unsure about anything - they are not gods, although one or two think they are! But still today, there is this absolute disregard for giving patients the information that not only should they know, but they have a dam well right to know!

As for pharmacists - they are one group of folks that I have the highest respect for and I've seen a number of cases where the pharmacist was correct and the doctor wrong! Pharmacists - at least 99.9% of them - know their stuff and know it very well. If I'm not sure about a drug I wouldn't hesitate to ask my pharmacist his/her opinion.

Great hub + voted up!!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you so much Seeker7, am really pleased to see someone in the medical field come in to comment. Really; doctors are a real problem. I don't know about others but many times I find myself coming home with a prescription for something I did not even complain about and what I went for was simply brushed over!

They; or many, appear to have become pushers!


DoItForHer 4 years ago

That sounds like you were speaking with your cell phone carrier about a problem with your service. What a mess!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

For sure DoItForHer; and I really need to do the part two to this.


CriticalMessage profile image

CriticalMessage 4 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Never thought it would be... Yet Potassium levels are of a huge concern for me these days... So thank you very much indeed... I found this to be usefully informative, to say the least... Thank You!!!


ChristyWrites profile image

ChristyWrites 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Thank-you for sharing your experience with us. Stay healthy Jackie xx


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

Good job, Jackie! I know a lately who had to be hospitalized a few months ago because she ate too many bananas! She loves bananas and she had been eating several a day. Don't do it folks!


CriticalMessage profile image

CriticalMessage 4 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

Awesome information provided in an easy to digest format !!!... And perfect timing too!!! As I begin to manage my new issues with Potassium levels... Thank You Jackie !!!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Criticalmessage I do have another half I was not allowed to publish but I really do need to get it here somehow. Thanks and glad if I could help.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Christy, I am finally good to go I think.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

That is true rebecca, we should all see what our numbers are when we see our doctor and keep on top of that, especially as we get older. Thanks for reading!


naimishika profile image

naimishika 4 years ago from India

Information provided is awesome. Thanks for sharing.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you for reading naimishika.


CriticalMessage profile image

CriticalMessage 4 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

It must have been a swing in my potassium levels that caused me to answer this hub twice... *blushes*


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Think nothing of it, I have done the same! We get too busy trying to catch up, CriticalMessage.


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 4 years ago from Peru, South America

Wow, this is a great reminder and a sobering one as well. One should definitely be cautious about imbalances in the body and diet changes. Voted up and shared!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you vespawoolf, I have more to put here about this. It really is a serious issue many should be noticing. I appreciate your sharing!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you molometer and I do think you are right. I would say that oath means little to very few. The older I get the more sure I am. It is scary really to think how they cover for each other and I saw that first hand with my mother.

Great to see you!


babs 4 years ago

Had my blood test results back yesterday, amongst other abnormal readings was 5.5 for potassium.

The receptionist has told me twice that the results are normal. I'm presuming this is marked on my notes.

Why isn't my doctor at least re-testing for this abnormal reading?


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Maybe they don't consider you in the danger zone yet babs, you should ask them what some prior numbers were and you can yourself do what you can to lower it. I had another hub done to show symptoms etc and Hp would not allow it, perhaps I can add some to this to help you with that. I know how frustrating it can be when others think so lightly of your concerns. Of course you know if you have chest pain you do not question it, go for help but there are particular signs of overly high potassium and I will do my best to get those here soon. Before bedtime if at all possible.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Babs I have the followup rewritten for the umpteenth time and will try to post it tomorrow sometime. If you want to email me and give me an address I will send you a copy so you have it regardless if you want. It is a very important research and has helped me very much. So little is written I want to get it out there and can't imagine what the problem is since the facts can't be changed only put into my words but possible someone in particular having their way is all I can imagine. As I say though you can try to catch it tomorrow or I will send it to you. Want to see you get those numbers down. Yours are only mid but as my article will tell you that is when you want to pay attention.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 4 years ago from Iowa

This is really interesting information. I'm on medication for HBP and have heard mixed messages about potassium's role in regulating blood pressure. This will prompt me to do some additional research myself.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Deborah there are certain types that run it high which is most dangerous, so you should look those up. I made these hubs very thorough but they would not allow me to put the meds and the diet good to keep it low for some reason. I will look into it again when I have spare time and see what I may can do. I honestly think this high potassium has probably cost many people their lives through heart attack when the answer would have been so simple.


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 4 years ago from Texas

I lost an uncle about five years back to a stroke induced by a low potassium condition. Potassium plays a role in the electro-connective interaction of the cells. When it is below the minimum acceptable levels these functions falter inducing a variety of effects. Any doctor who ignores potassium levels is definitely playing with fire. Unfortunately, their insurance providers over caution them to the point that they do not communicate with the patient as they should. This is another down side to the heavy levels of legal litigation which plagues the medical industry and drives up consumer costs. Good write, Jackie! ~WB


Momma Mia profile image

Momma Mia 4 years ago from North Carolina

Great and very informative hub. Thank you for sharing this with us.

Always

wishingUwell

Mia


Barbara Kay profile image

Barbara Kay 4 years ago from USA

Different medications can be dangerous. You need a good doctor that knows what to watch for and they need to make you aware of the dangers of certain drugs. Sorry to say, I have had doctors in the past that I had remind about checking things.


Deerwhisperer profile image

Deerwhisperer 4 years ago from Bradenton, Florida

Very informative hub. Thanks for sharing.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thanks Wayne, I found out quite accidentally or I may have been another victim. You sound very knowledgeable on it and that is a very good thing.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Momma Mia, thank you so much and well wishes to you too.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Barbara and you are right, we all need to make sure of our health an d not trust it to anyone, to far. I am off the medicine now I had a problem with and my numbers are good.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thanks so much Deerwhisperer!


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

Hi Jackie,

Well, since I read Part Two before reading Part One, I thought I better get over here and read. Thank you for bringing awareness to this most important health issue! All should heed this warning no doubt.

Up and more and sharing

God bless, Faith Reaper


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Well thankfully I am off that medicine now but it is a big concern to many. Thank you for sharing!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Well thankfully I am off that medicine now but it is a big concern to many. Thank you for sharing!


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

Good thing you were a vigilant patient. I learned something from your experience (didn't know about too much potassium). After having my own reaction to medicine (I was put on something I never should have received), I read the boring little leaflets of fine print that come with my medicines -- especially the newer medicines on the market. I have also noticed the drug reps in and out of the doctors' offices, often with goodies near lunchtime, and often making my doctor run late for his or her appointments with patients. You can check out any "kickbacks" your doctor has received from Big Pharma on the following website: http://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/. When I checked out my neurologist, I was not surprised. It made me very wary about whether he truly had my best interests at heart -- speaking fees, meals, travel, consulting payouts, and entertainment galore. Money makes the world go 'round. It has made me a more informed medical consumer. I wish you the best in your health.


Nitin Pillai profile image

Nitin Pillai 3 years ago from Mumbai, Maharastra, India

Thanks a lot for sharing this Jackie! But I doubt eating too many bananas(as pointed at about) will cause any damage. Potassium supplements (Taken by bodybuilders, once including me), do have the potential of great damage if taken excessively by the general public. But I doubt potassium derived from bananas can cause any damage. Voted up Jackie!


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you FlourishAnyway for you very informative comment. We must look out for ourselves, indeed.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South Author

Thank you Nitin Pillai, it was not my intention to apply that about bananas, just my getting carried away in the telling of a story, lol. My main fear here is medicines that can run potassium up and doctors offices in general that give blood tests routinely and apparently don't bother to tell patients the results or to take care with certain medicines. It is just to make people more aware of high potassium, which I believe kills many more people than we will ever know about. I don't want to be one nor my friends.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 15 months ago from The Beautiful South Author

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