Seaweed To Tackle Obesity

Edible Seaweed

Use Seaweed to lose weight

If you are serious about trying to lose weight then no doubt you will have tried many weight loss diets. What will shed pounds for one may not necessarily work for others. It would appear we all have a diet which suits us best.

Seaweed has long been used as a food and is a common culinary additive in many parts of the world. More recently it is recieving recognition as a help in losing weight.

Seaweed has long been on the menu in Wales where it is served up as Lava Bread (Bara lawr). Not only is it a very tasty and abundant food source but it does you good too. The Japanese also recognise the health giving properties and as well as eating it also include in some make up preparations.

British scientists have now discovered that seaweed may also be a big help in tackling obesity. Tests have shown that the fibres present in some types of seaweed may actually decrease the amount of fat taken up by the body by as much as a whopping 75%!

The product the scientists have come up with looks nothing like the above photograph. Their extract is both colourless and odourless. In fact similar products are already been used in food for people such as ice cream. It is only just now that it is being recognised that there are other positive uses that it can be put to.

Plans are now afoot to market the discovery by including the seaweed extracts into some foodstuffs such as yoghurt and bread. The active alginates in the seaweed have been found to be quite palatable and early tests have been very promising.

A product which shows promise of reducing the amount of fat taken on board by the body by as much as three quarters can only be on to a winner as they offer the slimmer new hope.

Laverbread

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Comments 10 comments

H P Roychoudhury profile image

H P Roychoudhury 6 years ago from Guwahati, India

More research work is necessary to know the truth.


Peter Dickinson profile image

Peter Dickinson 6 years ago from South East Asia Author

H P Roychoudhury - it is like all diets I am sure. Works for some and not for others. However a 75% reduction of fat uptake by the body can only be good and even if further research showed they were half wrong it would still be a positive. Thank you for reading.


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 6 years ago from London, UK

Thank you for your informative hub. I am worried that if they do in a grand scale -- guess what will happened?


Peter Dickinson profile image

Peter Dickinson 6 years ago from South East Asia Author

Hello hello - You are right, it could be a worry but at the same time they may take more care of the oceans as a result.


entertianmentplus profile image

entertianmentplus 6 years ago from United States

Nice hub


Peter Dickinson profile image

Peter Dickinson 6 years ago from South East Asia Author

Thank you entertainmentplus


theherbivorehippi profile image

theherbivorehippi 6 years ago from Holly, MI

I need to get some seaweed! I keep reading so many fabulous things about it...I must make a point to start eating some!


Peter Dickinson profile image

Peter Dickinson 6 years ago from South East Asia Author

theherbivorehippi - Whilst traveling I have eaten it in may forms. My favourite has to be 'Samphire' which my ex wife and I used to pick on the Lincolnshire and Cumria coasts. Lightly boiled and eaten with butter it made a truly superior asparagus.


Lee B profile image

Lee B 6 years ago from New Mexico

Fascinating information. I must admit it sounds too good to be true!


Peter Dickinson profile image

Peter Dickinson 6 years ago from South East Asia Author

Lee B - I agree it does. However I am sure it is worth a try as it makes logical sense that it should if the decrease in fat absorbtion works.

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