Symptoms of Anxiety & Panic Attacks

Do you ever feel like you are in a fog?

Source

The symptoms of anxiety and panic attacks are quite similar. Yet, as you will learn, they occur in different ways.

ANXIETY ATTACKS typically occur in response to a stressor, something that stimulates a reaction. These attacks can be very short lived because when the stressor is gone, so is the anxiety attack.

For example, you are shopping with your toddler when all of a sudden your child is nowhere to be found. You begin to have an immediate anxiety attack: you feel short of breath, your heart races faster and you are afraid that something horrible happened. Just 90 seconds later, you find your child two isles over looking at toys. The anxiety attack subsides.

PANIC ATTACKS typically do not occur in response to a stressor. A panic attack comes out of nowhere. The timing is unpredictable as there is no reason for the panic.

For example, you feel fearful, there is tightness in your chest and your breathing becomes shallow. Yet you have absolutely no idea where these feelings came from. You weren’t upset about anything. You are not afraid of anything. There was no trigger or stressor to make you feel this way.

Do you ever feel you are suffocating in an uncontrollable downward spiral?

Source

"Panic attacks were once dismissed as nerves or stress, but they're now recognized as a real medical condition. Although panic attacks can significantly affect your quality of life, treatment is very effective."

Source: Mayo Clinic

Anxiety and Panic Attack Symptoms

Whether you are experiencing anxiety or panic attacks, these are some of the more common symptoms that may be prevalent.

  • A feeling of being disconnected
  • A sudden overwhelming fear
  • Sense of imminent death
  • Rapid heart rate/palpitations
  • Chest tightness/pain
  • Hot/sweating or chills
  • Dilated eyes
  • Altered state of reality
  • Shortness of breath/hyperventilation
  • Nausea/abdominal cramping
  • Headache
  • Numbness/tingling sensations/weak muscles
  • Dizziness/faintness
  • Sense of choking/trouble swallowing
  • A feeling of losing control
  • Unable to concentrate


Personal Example of a Panic Attack #2

Can you relate?

I walked in to a crowded Super K-Mart store at Christmas time. I was feeling fine. I needed something from the Christmas section that was way in the back of the store. As I was walking through the aisles, my eyes began to feel funny. It seemed like the bright fluorescent lighting was making me squint and begin to have a headache.

When I got to the Christmas area, there were toy trains rolling on their tracks while whistling, wind up stuffed animals singing holiday tunes and the overhead holiday music was playing loud, somewhat overshadowing the noise and commotion in the store around me. I usually enjoy all the holiday cheer, but this day was different.

I began to feel sick. My chest started to feel ‘squeezed.’ But why? I was just fine a few minutes ago. My legs were weak like they did not have the strength to hold me up.

I thought something horrible was happening to me, maybe a stroke or heart attack? I kept thinking, oh my gosh, am I going to die right here in K-Mart among all these strangers? I held on to my cart and headed for the exit.

This episode frightened me to a point where I avoided shopping at Super K-Mart for years.

Personal Example of a Panic Attack #1

Can you relate?

I had just arrived at work, an office job for a local utility. I felt strange and confused. I knew I had lots of work to complete yet I felt like I just couldn’t do it.

I sat in my desk chair, turned my computer on and tried to begin my work. I couldn’t sit still. I stood up, walked around my desk as if I was lost in a fog. I couldn’t concentrate. I was extremely nervous. I knew something was wrong with me but I had no idea what it was. All I knew was that I needed to get out of there. I began sweating, felt like crying and my body seemed numb, especially my face and neck area. I told my boss that something was wrong and I needed to leave. He asked me if I was okay. I simply answered “I don’t know” as I quickly grabbed my belongings and headed for the door. I was scared.

I called my mom and asked her to meet me at the hospital. I drove myself to the emergency room. My heart was pounding and my legs did not want to hold me up yet somehow I walked in to the front desk. I thought I was going to die. “What is going on with me?” I was freaking out. I was extremely impatient. Finally I was called in and the ER doctor gave me meds to calm down, Valium or something, while they ran a slew of tests on me.

After many hours of feeling sick, scared and thinking of so many horrible problems I might be diagnosed with, I was simply told “It was just a panic attack. There is nothing physically wrong with you.”


UNLIKE ANXIETY ATTACKS, PANIC ATTACKS USUALLY DO NOT OCCUR IN RESPONSE TO A STRESSOR

Have you ever experienced a PANIC attack?

See results without voting

Obtain a Proper Medical Diagnosis

Anxiety and panic attacks can be very difficult to manage and may get worse without proper treatment. Plus, the symptoms can often mimic other life-threatening conditions and illnesses. Therefore, it is important to visit a medical professional for an evaluation and accurate diagnosis.

Things You Can Do Immediately to Help Relieve Anxiety and Panic Attack Symptoms

  • L-Theanine ~ an amino acid supplement known to relieve anxiety and is also used for natural relaxation due to its calming effect.
  • Incorporate relaxation techniques into your daily routine ~ methods such as meditation, deep breathing and muscle relaxation can increase your emotional well being while reducing anxiety.
  • Reach out for support from friends and family ~ talk about the anxiety or panic attacks you may be having and ask for help if needed.
  • Stick to healthy eating habits ~ eating healthy will help your body stay in balance.
  • Limit alcohol, nicotine and caffeine consumption ~ although many think these things help you relax, the truth is they actually lead to more anxiety.
  • Exercise regularly ~ exercise is a natural anxiety reliever.
  • Get enough sleep ~ a lack of sleep can intensify anxiety and panic attack symptoms.
  • Write down things that are bothering you ~ journaling about what is going on in your life, your concerns and worries, is a great way to release these things from your mind and help eliminate anxiety.

Best wishes!

This is Sharyn’s Slant


Disclaimer: Information in this article is for educational purposes only and not intended to replace proper medical advice.

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Comments 60 comments

TToombs08 profile image

TToombs08 4 years ago from Somewhere between Heaven and Hell without a road map.

Thank you for sharing this! When I am extremely stressed, I tend to get hit with axiety attacks or migraines. I almost prefer the migrains. :) Voted up and then some. :)


Pamela N Red profile image

Pamela N Red 4 years ago from Oklahoma

Sharyn, that sounds so scary. I know a couple people that suffer with these and they can be a terrible feeling as well as embarrassing. Thank you for sharing.


kelleyward 4 years ago

Sharyn, this is a fantastic hub. I remember when I had a panic attack it came on out of nowhere. I had just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and found out I was pregnant. I was stressed but I remember eating breakfast one morning and not feeling stressed at all. Then all of a sudden I had tunnel vision and felt like I was going to faint. I thought it was my blood sugar at first but after I had a couple more of these episodes I realized they were panic attacks. The next time I felt one coming on I just talked myself through the panic attack, breathed slowly, and prayed and I never had one since. They were very scary I have to admit. Thanks for sharing this! Voted up and Shared! Take care, Kelley


JKenny profile image

JKenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

Great hub Sharyn. I suffered from panic attacks for the first time near Christmas last year, and I remember thinking that they were a precursor to a heart attack. I actually suffered from several over a period of three weeks. The attacks and the associated depression that came afterwards resulted in me missing three months of work.

Really appreciate you writing this. Just wish I'd read something like this when I was actually experiencing the attacks.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 4 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

Thanks for the tips! I DO have them occasionally. Like you, I thought it was something serious, like a heart attack. I called First Response, and the old ticker was fine!


Victoria Lynn profile image

Victoria Lynn 4 years ago from Arkansas, USA

Yes! Panic attacks are absolutely terrifying. I thought I was having a heart attack. At the ER, they gave me Xanax to calm me down and told me there was nothing physically wrong with me. I have used Xanax only occasionally since then as the attacks have subsided. My boyfriend had some, too, years, ago, then they went away. It's a weird phenomenon. I've experienced, and I still don't understand it. Thanks for sharing this. It's good information for people to know.


Dawnrichard profile image

Dawnrichard 4 years ago

Hello Sharynsslant. Thanks for sharing such a great hub and i will suggest if you suffering from this just try to sleep a lot and talk to your doctor. Don't try to take medicines from online like Xanax or something.


angela_michelle profile image

angela_michelle 4 years ago from United States

This was very interesting. You made a very clear distinction between the two. I don't think I've ever truly had a panick attack, but I experience undue anxiety a lot. I did think I was experiencing panic attacks over a short period. Once I went to the doctor, I explained to him, I feel like I'm having a panick attack, except, my brain is calm. It wasn't for another three months that we discovered I was having asthma attacks.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi TToombs08 ~ I'm not sure if I'd prefer these attacks or migraines. I guess I'd say migraines also cuz I've suffered with panic attacks and it is horrible. Thank you for your feedback and votes!

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Pam ~ glad to hear you DON'T know what these attacks are like. They are scary because one of the main feelings/thoughts is that you think you are going to die. And yes, they can be embarrassing also. It's not something that those around you easily understand and they kinda think you are "nuts." Thanks for stopping by!

Sharyn


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Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi kelleyward ~ Panic attacks do come out of nowhere. They are quite unpredictable. "Tunnel vision" is a good description of a symptom. That is so cool that you have been able to work through them yourself and have not had them again. Thank you for sharing your story here. Take care,

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hey JKenny ~ Sorry to hear that you unfortunately understand what these attacks are like. And as you said, it is common to feel as though you might be having a heart attack. It's scary. And depression likely follows in some form because you feel as though your life is turned upside down. I appreciate you sharing your story here. I hope you are doing much better today.

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Rebecca ~ You are welcome. Yup, that feeling of thinking you are having a heart attack is real and scary. I'm sure ER's are so used to those signs of panic vs. the "real thing." Thanks for your feedback.

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Vicki ~ Wow, once you've had a true panic attack, you sure can relate. Feelings of a heart attack and ending up in the ER and being told there is nothing wrong with you - boy can I relate. I love how you said "it's a weird phenomenon" - it truly is.

My panic attacks were really bad in my 20's and in to my 30's. I don't believe I have had a "real" one in about 15 years at this point. But I can remember them like it was yesterday. For me, I take Zoloft and have for many years. This is what has stopped the attacks for me. I got off the Zoloft after about five years on it and began to have attacks again. Therefore, I am back on it and have no attacks at all. I really don't like the fact of taking the med but I am honestly afraid to go off it again. The result is horrible. I'm sharing this personal "stuff" so that others may not feel so alone I guess. I'm glad to hear that your (and your boyfriend's) attacks are better. Thanks for your feedback, take care,

Sharyn


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Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Dawnrichard ~ You suggest sleeping a lot and talking to your doctor. The problem I found is that I had a difficult time sleeping when I was occasionally having the attacks. I wanted to sleep to make it all go away but my thoughts wouldn't shut down so I could sleep. And regarding Xanax, what I worry most about that for people is that is can be highly addictive. I remember being given Xanax only for the time when I was waiting for the Zoloft to take effect (which takes 2-4 weeks). I stay away from it now. Speaking to a medical professional is a must to make sure nothing else is going on physically. Thanks so much for your feedback.

Sharyn


Angela Blair profile image

Angela Blair 4 years ago from Central Texas

Wow -- what a scary, scary thing. I've never had a panic attack but appreciate the information as I was aware such a thing existed but had no clue as to symptoms, etc. Seems to me this is something that could happen to anyone at any time -- excellent Hub and voted up! Best/Sis


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hello angela_michelle ~ I really appreciate your feedback. I guess it's a good thing that you finally got a diagnosis of asthma. But that certainly can be scary as well. I would imagine that many of the anxiety/panic symptoms are similar to that of an asthma attack. Thank you so much for stopping by!

Sharyn


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

Excellent Sharyn - I have had anxiety but never a panic attack. I really didn't realize what a huge difference there was between the two. I actually thought they were sort of interchangeable! Ha!

I experience the anxiety attacks just like you said - if I can't find a child or it used to occur more when my oldest started driving and she wasn't home. If I heard sirens I would call frantically to make sure it wasn't her! Lol lol. I'm always happiest when all my chicks are here where I can see them!

Here is one thing that works really well for me when I recognize the symptoms - I make myself breathe deeply and slowly. This naturally slows down the parasympathetic nervous system...which JS where the adrenaline jolt comes from. So by simply slowing your breaths it slows the nervous system down:) it really helps me a lot!


Movie Master profile image

Movie Master 4 years ago from United Kingdom

Hi Sharyn, panic and anxiety attacks are so scary, thank you for sharing this helpful and useful information.

voted up, best wishes Lesley


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

This is extremely valuable information, Sharon, for anyone who suffers from anxiety/panic attacks. You have peformed a public service, m'dear.

Forcing yourself to breathe more deeply and more slowly can help while at the same time using self-hypnosis (self-talk) to assure yourself that you are feeling better and better. It takes concentration but it does work.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hey Sis (Angela) ~ it's so great to see you. I haven't been around reading too much lately and I feel bad. Never enough time! I hope all is well with you.

Yes, panic attacks are extremely scary. They come out of nowhere with no reason. So worrying about another attack becomes a common routine. I'm glad to hear you have never experienced them. Thanks for your feedback, take care,

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hey Kelly ~ thanks for the compliment! Yes, there is certainly a difference between anxiety and panic attacks. The symptoms are similar but the panic attacks are not warranted. You have no idea when they will hit.

You sound like my sister . . . recently her third out of four boys is now driving. If she hears sirens nearby, she freaks out and calls their cell phones. And you are so right about the deep breathing. It can really help. It's kind of like a "mind over matter" thing. Keep telling yourself you are gonna be okay while you slow your breathing down. I always appreciate your great feedback, thank you Kel!

Sharyn


sholland10 profile image

sholland10 4 years ago from Southwest Missouri

Sharyn, this is great information. Many people have anxiety attacks and do not realize it. Deep breathing helps me and pushing myself to move forward. Usually my anxiety comes with the anticipation of something then I see it is not nearly as bad as I thought it was going to be. It is scary to have that tightness in your chest - like an elephant sitting on it or to feel disoriented and not be able to get your thoughts together. You have listed some excellent ways of dealing with anxiety. I have never tried it, but I am very interested in hypnosis. Thanks for sharing! Votes and shares! :-)


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Lesley ~ Yes, "scary" is a word I used to describe these attacks! I'm so glad you stopped by and found this information useful. Take care,

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Dr. BJ ~ A public service? I will absolutely take that compliment, ha. Thank you so much. And I agree that deep breathing and self talk can do wonders. It takes practice but is a great simple resource when anxiety creeps up. I always appreciate your feedback.

Sharyn


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Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Susan H ~ Yup, that elephant on your chest is a huge burden :) And as you said, one of my major symptoms of my panic attacks was the feeling of being disoriented and in a fog. Oooooh, I hate that feeling. Let me know if you try hypnosis. I never have, just the thought causes anxiety! Thank you for your awesome feedback and shares. I appreciate you!

Sharyn


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

I bet there are a lot of people reading this hub thinking, "so that's what was wrong with me!" Not knowing all the facts but just from life experience I would say more people have anxiety attacks than panic attacks. You've done a good job of explaining the two. This is a very informative hub that should be read by lots of folks. Voted up, useful and interesting. Plus, I SHARED it.


thelyricwriter profile image

thelyricwriter 4 years ago from West Virginia

Sharyn, very useful article. I suffer from panic attacks myself. For the most part, I can control them. But at times, they are very difficult to bare. You have listed some valuable and helpful information. Great write.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi tillsontitan ~ I think you are right, anxiety attacks are more common than panic attacks. Both are definitely bothersome. Yet the panic attacks are so difficult to understand. From my experience, if you have actual panic attacks, you will know it. It's different than anything else and very scary. Thanks so much for your feedback and votes and sharing :)

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

thelyricwriter ~ I'm so glad you can control your panic attacks (for the most part). It isn't always easy to do. I was not well for a long time, even just the fear of having another one was disabling. Thank you so much for sharing your experience.

Sharyn


iamaudraleigh 4 years ago

A great hub I will reference to help my anxiety...thanks for writing this!


dmop profile image

dmop 4 years ago from Cambridge City, IN

I was told by an ER doctor that I had experienced a panic attack once, but still don't believe it was. I was later told by an herbal and natural healing specialist that I was very toxic and after some meditation and natural therapy I began feeling better. I don't think it was a panic attack because it lasted for several months, before I finally found relief. Great Hub; voted up, useful, and interesting.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hey Audra ~ you are welcome. I am so glad you found this information helpful.

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi dmop ~ whether or not you were having a panic attack, it certainly sounds very scary what you were going through. My thoughts are also that it was not a panic attack since it lasted for several months. From my experience, panic attacks come and go, maybe for many years, but not a consistent "attack" as you describe. I am glad you found relief with natural therapies and meditation. Thank you so much for your comments.

Sharyn


mours sshields 4 years ago from Elwood, Indiana

Very interesting and informative article. I can relate.

Marcia Ours


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Marcia ~ thanks for stopping by. I appreciate your feedback!

Sharyn


emilybee profile image

emilybee 4 years ago

Yes, a wonderful family trait I received from my mom ;) Your Kmart story interested me-I feel that way occasionally at certain stores, so I avoid those stores. There has to be a reason why it happened in that store. For me, it's the layout, if it's very claustrophobic that could be it, I sometimes get panicky if I can't see all the exits, or if it's very dark inside or not much room to move. It definitely helps talking yourself through it and reassuring yourself that you really will be ok :)


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 4 years ago from malang-indonesia

Very informative hub. Sometimes I feel panic in such of unexpected situation. But usually I took a deep breath and stay calm. My friend, I learn many things here. Thanks for share with us. Voted up an take care :-)

Prasetio


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Emily ~ darn, you got that trait too :) My K-Mart story is SO real to me, even today maybe 20+ years later. It was horrible. My biggest thing that got to me was the lighting in the stores and then any type of crowd. I avoided places that I had panic attacks for a long time. It got really difficult when I had a bad one in the shower and was afraid to take a shower. I forced myself eventually after three days. Thank you so much for sharing your experience. Self talk does help but back then the only self talk I was doing was "omg, I'm gonna die." And "omg, I think I'm crazy." Anyway, thank you for your feedback, take care Emily!

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hey Pras ~ so nice to see you. I am so glad you found this informative. If you are feeling panic when it really is not warranted, you may truly be having panic attacks. But yes, deep breathing, as simple as it is, can really help. I wish you the best! Thanks for stopping by.

Sharyn


cclitgirl profile image

cclitgirl 4 years ago from Western NC

Wow. Thanks for sharing this. I'm making some decisions in my life that will allow me to move away from stressful situations. In the meantime, every time I think about work, for example, I get butterflies in my stomach, I start biting my nails and can't concentrate. BUT, in a few days, the school year will be over. Thank goodness. This nervousness is making me crazy! I'll check into some of the techniques you describe here. :)


Diane Woodson profile image

Diane Woodson 4 years ago from Evansville, Indiana

I have had these for over 25 years, can you message me, I am starting to think it is a combo effect...take vistaril, had no migraines for about 7 months, bipolar, all blood levels are good, hypothyroid as well. Dr regularly....grasping to keep head above water, hungover from Sat. still, it was really horrible...


SkeetyD profile image

SkeetyD 4 years ago from Barbados

I have experienced several panic attacks and I find that for the most part, people who have never experienced them personally seem to think that these attacks are a figment of your imagination


Diane Woodson profile image

Diane Woodson 4 years ago from Evansville, Indiana

I tried to write you but posted a comment question instead. Thanks, you are so true, peole think you are nuts if you have these. I have lots to share if you can write me. If you want to discuss it that is.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Cyndi ~ Making decisions for yourself that will help your life be less stressful is a great idea and I give you lots of credit. I understand feeling foggy, biting nails, etc. I hope some of the tips here are a help to you. Good luck!

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Diane ~ Gosh, having panic attacks for 25 years is horrible. That is way too long to suffer without some sort of relief. I'm glad to hear your migraines are better.

I would be happy to chat with you further. I will send you a message through HP and then you will have my email address. Also, are you on Facebook? We could communicate that way too. Hang in there, you are not alone!

Sharyn


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 4 years ago from Oakley, CA

Thanks for a very interesting article. Luckily, this has never happened to me, and for those to whom it has happened, it certainly sounds as if "never again" would be too soon!

My younger daughter has had anxiety/panic attacks--the first time it happened, she feared she was having a heart attack, and went to the ER. She was thinking, "What the hey? I'm not even 40 years old yet!"

Her diagnosis was as you describe. She now is very aware of eating healthy, and in fact, has discovered she's allergic to caffeine..it gives her "the shakes."

Voted up, interesting, useful and shared.


Virtual Treasures profile image

Virtual Treasures 4 years ago from Michigan

Great article. My brother began having panic attacks after he was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis. He truly thought he was having a heart attack. It was horrible. I am going to print this and share it with him. He doesn't like taking medications unless he has to. Thank you so much for sharing. I am also going to share with my followers.


Lucky Cats profile image

Lucky Cats 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California

Hi Sharon!! i've always enjoyed and learned from your astute writing and this hub right up there with the best of your articles. Excellent information and written in a very understandable and personal way...thankfully, I'venever experienced a "panic attack" per se though, during times of extreme sadness at loss; I've felt similarly to how you've described it here...but as the result of a stressor and not spontaneous and for no particular reason. All UPS but funny, Sharon...you are such a great writer and real person...very good to be your friend. Kathy


Peter Geekie profile image

Peter Geekie 4 years ago from Sittingbourne

Dear Sharon

Unless you have suffered one you can't realise how devastating a panic attack is.

Some years ago I flew from London to chicago to give a lecture on renewable fuels.

I stood on stage in front of hundreds and started to speak. Suddenly everything started to echo my vision flickered sweat poured down my face and my knees turned to jelly. I had to stop take a glass of water and moved to plan b - tell a few jokes until things returned to normal. Well it didn't return and I collapsed spark out on stage.

It took months of hypnotheraphy and reiki to get me able to even venture out in public.

Panic attacks are considered to be something of a joke but I can assure they are not funny

Kind regards Peter


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hello SkeetyD ~ Absolutely, people who have not experienced panic attacks cannot possibly understand how devastating they can be. It's not our imagination yet it feels like it sometimes because there is no good explanation as to why they are happening. Thank you so much for your feedback. Good luck to you!

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Diane ~ Great, we found each other here and on FB too. Just so you know, I did delete your comment that had your email address, etc., in it. Take care of yourself.

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hello Ms Lizzy ~ definitely be thankful you never had these attacks. But it does sound like your daughter understands. I hope she is doing okay now. Staying away from the caffeine is a good idea even if she isn't allergic. I really appreciate your feedback. Thank you!

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hello Virtual Treasures ~ I am so glad you will share this with your brother. I know all too well that feeling of thinking you are having a heart attack. I haven't had a panic attack for many years but can still remember it like it was yesterday. Thank you so much for your feedback and sharing.

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Kathy ~ Your comments mean so much to me! And I am SO honored to be your friend. I'm glad you never experience actual panic attacks. They can be truly devastating. Thank you for your encouraging words always, they make me want to continue writing!

Sharyn


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Peter ~ your comment is right on! I see you understand the devastation that panic attacks can cause. And I agree, there are people that think you may be "faking" an attack or simply that it is no big deal. It is a HUGE deal and not funny at all. I really appreciate your feedback. Take care,

Sharyn


meloncauli profile image

meloncauli 4 years ago from UK

Good hub on a subject close to my heart. I suffered with panic disorder for decades but have been well for a few years now and I don't expect to get panic disorder again! We are all open to have a panic attack in our lives, but we can learn skills to avoid getting panic disorder.


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 4 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hello meloncauli ~ I love your hub name! So sorry to hear that you suffered for so long with panic disorder. But so glad to hear that you've learned the skills to avoid it. That's not an easy thing to do as I am sure you can attest to. Thank you so much for stopping by and leaving feedback. Thank you for the follow also. Take care,

Sharyn


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 3 years ago

I have friends who suffer from anxiety attacks and some times they are severe. Your advice is really good and love your examples of attacks. I see you have listed eating healthy and exercise as helpful and they are factors that will help in other ways as well. Voted way up!


Sharyn's Slant profile image

Sharyn's Slant 3 years ago from Northeast Ohio USA Author

Hi Diana ~ Thank you for the compliments. I'm so glad you feel this is sound advice. Thank you so much for stopping by and for your vote!

Sharyn

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