Common Heart Conditions - Coronary Heart Disease

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Heart disease is a general term used to describe a number of conditions that affect millions of people all over the world. Under this heading are a number of common heart ailments that either:

  • Affect the blood supply to the heart
  • Affect the muscles and general functioning of the heart
  • Affect the electrical impulse system of the heart

According to the World Health Organisation, (WHO) various forms of heart disease account for 7.3 million deaths in the world every year. Combined with people who have died from strokes, cardiovascular diseases account for 30% of the worldwide death total - this is a huge amount.

The heart itself is a very strong organ and capable of awesome feats, but it's also vulnerable as we can see from the above figures.

Basic overview of the heart and coronary arteries

As most of us know the heart is basically a pump that drives oxygenated blood, received from the lungs, to the rest of the body and sends de-oxygented blood back to the lungs to pick up more oxygen.

Blood carries both oxygen and nutrients to keep the internal organs and body healthy. The heart also needs to have oxygen and nutrition to keep it strong and the coronary arteries are the blood vessels that supply these to the heart. The arteries can be seen on the surface of the heart and there are two main branches:

  • Right coronary artery
  • Left coronary artery

Lets now look at what coronary artery disease actually is.

The heart showing the coronary arteries that supply it's own blood.
The heart showing the coronary arteries that supply it's own blood. | Source

Heart Facts

1. Clench your fist. This is approximately the size of your own heart.
2. It can take under a minute for the heart to pump blood to every cell in your body.
3. Scientists have proof that laughter is good for the heart. Researchers observed that when people laughed the lining of the blood vessels relaxed, so increasing blood flow, for approximately 45 minutes after laughing stopped.
4. Both the zebra fish and red-spotted newts are able to repair their own damaged heart cells. Scientists are researching how this amazing natural ability could be utilised to help humans and other animals.

What is coronary heart disease?

According to National Health Service Statistics (NHSS) in the UK over 94,000 people die each year due to coronary heart disease (CHD). There are a further 2.6 million who are living with the condition. In other countries the statistics are also high for CHD but one major change over the last few years is that it is no longer viewed as a man's disease. The amount of women experiencing CHD is growing and in some areas more women than men have the ailment.

Coronary Heart Disease

As we have seen, the coronary arteries supply the heart with the blood it needs to function. This is of course different from the blood that flows through the heart to supply the whole body. Due to various factors, these arteries can become clogged up with deposits that narrow the space through which the blood flows. This condition is known as atherosclerosis. The deposits are known as atheroma and contain fatty substances (including cholesterol) and cell debris. When the blood supply starts to diminish a number of things can happen:

  • When the vessels are narrowed not enough blood supply is given to the heart to work properly. The pain and discomfort of this condition is called angina.
  • Sometimes a piece will break off the fatty deposits and can form a clot that can fully block an artery or other vessel.
  • If one of these clots blocks off a heart artery completely, preventing blood from getting to the heart muscles, you could suffer permanent heart damage. This is what we call a heart attack. Other names that you may have heard of for a heart attack are - coronary thrombosis, myocardial infarction (MI), acute coronary syndrome.

What causes coronary heart disease?

There are a number of factors that can lead to a person developing CHD. The more factors that a person is exposed to the greater the risk is. Below is a list of the major contributory factors:

  • Diabetes - with diabetes the illness has a tendency to make blood vessel walls thicker and more prone to blockage leading to artery disease and heart attack.
  • Smoking - the chemicals in cigarette smoke in particular damages the blood vessels of the heart.
  • High Blood Pressure - increases the strain on the blood vessels so wearing them out
  • Obesity - although obesity itself does not cause CHD, being over weight can lead to other conditions that can cause CHD. Conditions such as type 2 diabetes. In addition, overweight people tend to have high cholesterol levels and an increased risk of high blood pressure, both of which can lead to CHD.
  • High Cholesterol - cholesterol is a natural and beneficial fat substance made by our liver from the saturated fats that we eat in food. However, too much cholesterol in the diet can cause narrowing of blood vessels.
  • Hereditary factors - according to NHS UK, if you have a male relative under 55 who has developed CHD or a female relative under 65 with CHD then this also increases your chances of developing the condition.
  • Lack of exercise. The heart is a powerful muscle that needs to be exercised to keep it healthy and working properly. Lack of exercise leads to a sluggish heart that is prone to developing disease.
  • Alcohol - a little alcohol does no harm and some scientific research has shown that wine in particular can be beneficial to the heart. Having said that, not all medical researchers agree that alcohol is beneficial as alternative research has thrown up conflicting results. However, alcohol in excess does cause fat levels in the blood to rise, leading to high blood pressure that can damage the heart vessels. In addition long term drinking and bouts of binge drinking can lead to a condition called cardiomyopathy, where the muscles of the heart are weakened.

The human heart is a wonder of nature but it can also be vulnerable to different conditions.
The human heart is a wonder of nature but it can also be vulnerable to different conditions. | Source
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How to prevent or minimise the risk of coronary heart disease

The British Heart Foundation and other health organisations have basically the same suggestions on how to minimise the risk of developing coronary heart disease:

  • Controlling your blood pressure. The two main ways to keep blood pressure within a normal range - it should be under 140/85mmHg - is to eat a healthy diet and get regular exercise. If you already have high blood pressure then ensure that you take your medication regularly and have frequent health checks from your doctor.
  • Control your alcohol intake - as mentioned previously, high levels of alcohol can damage the heart muscles and cause high blood pressure.
  • Give up smoking.
  • Regular exercise is essential to keep the heart muscles healthy.
  • Keep your weight within your normal range for your height and age.
  • A balanced, healthy diet is one of the best ways to minimise the risk of developing CHD. In addition, limit your salt intake as too much can increase blood pressure.
  • If you have another condition such as diabetes that increases your risk of developing CHD, then keeping it under control will definitely help to reduce the risks.
  • Ensure that any medications prescribed for you for your heart, diabetes, high blood pressure and so on are taken continually as directed.

CHD like many other heart conditions are mostly avoidable or at least we are able to minimise the risks significantly. A few simple changes in lifestyle could add years of quality life to enjoy rather than being endured due to heart disease.

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Comments 13 comments

teresapelka profile image

teresapelka 4 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

I don't have eggs at all, as for cardiovascular health. Changing diets obviously might be not easy, but to me, if you want to give your heart a chance, don't have eggs.

I learned about the effects of the yellow and the white and thought if they could be tasty.

An egg is actually some portion of a mouth clogging thing. ;)


mperrottet profile image

mperrottet 4 years ago from Pennsauken, NJ

Good overview of coronary heart disease. I love the fact that laughing is good for the heart. Voted up!


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 4 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

Good information! Mine currently is 102/63 after dropping my weight from 205 to 156. The standard in Britain is a "normal" ranging from 90/60 up to 130/80.. That is less than the upper limit in this Hub, and AHA also recommended this lower limit for the high normal several years ago. Birth control pills can affect blood pressure, so women want to have their annual checkups. Take an average of your blood pressures done separately twice at the same time of the day and under similar circumstances. Many of this Hub's tips for a healthy heart, are also relevant to avoiding strokes.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 4 years ago from Shelton

Than you Seeker7 for this very useful, jelpful, educational hub on CHD.. sometimes we take even our hearts for granted.. and this hub just breaks it down even for guys like me...:) bless you


VirginiaLynne profile image

VirginiaLynne 4 years ago from United States

Thanks for this overview! I've been on the Naturally Slim weight loss program and one of my main concerns was making sure I am keeping as healthy as I can. Looking at your information helps me to see that for the most part I'm doing pretty well. Great Hub with lots of good information and statistics. Voted up!


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

Voted up and interesting. Thanks you for this very useful and informative hub. Passing this on.


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland Author

Hi teresapelka, many thanks for stopping by and leaving such an interesting comment. I think there are many people who would agree with you about eggs and don't eat them at all.


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland Author

Hi Perspycacious - that's an excellent BP to have!!! Well done! Yes, here in the UK we do tend to go for the lower limit as being more beneficial rather than the upper. You're also correct about strokes and the tips for a healthy heart. Both come under Cardiovascular Diseases and health benefits for the heart, will have benefits for blood vessels all over the body, in particular the brain.

I don't need birth control now at my age. But I stopped it many years ago, not only due to the blood pressure issue but also the higher risk of developing a DVT (deep venous thrombosis). However, the clincher was when I did develop gall stones and had to have my gall bladder removed. As my consultant at the times said - 'the don't tell you on the birth control packet that gall stones are another side effect'!

Many thanks for stopping by and for leaving a very interesting and informative comment.


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland Author

Hi Frank! Always lovely to hear from you. Glad that you enjoyed the hub and yes, I agree, we do take our hearts for granted and sometimes we get a serious wake up call that changes everything.


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland Author

Hi VirginiaLynne, lovely to hear from you again. Glad that you enjoyed the hub and found it useful. I've been watching my weight for quite a long time along with the diet. Both my Mum and Dad developed heart disease, so it does run in our family.


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland Author

HI Gypsy, always lovely to hear from you and glad that you enjoyed the hub!! Thanks for the pass on - greatly appreciated.


old albion profile image

old albion 4 years ago from Lancashire. England.

Hi Helen. Thank you for this information packed hub. Well presented and easy to follow. Tip Top.

Graham.


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland Author

Hi Graham, lovely to hear from you and glad that you enjoyed the hub!

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