Being Bipolar, It is A Fact

Being Bipolar-It Is A Fact

I have been diagnosed with bipolar for several years now, I have traveled the world unexpectedly, hoping to find a dream. A dream I did not find. I did however along my travels find many adventures, handfuls of wonderful friends, strangers wandering aimlessly, and happiness in places I will probably never see again. Despair, hopelessness and enough crazy behaviors to last my entire lifetime.

I have been diagnosed about a dozen times, quite possibly more. The reason being every time I moved I had to find a new psychiatrist and therapist. So ultimately I ended up going through the entire process each and every time. So that tells me, I finally had to come to believe I was mentally ill, like it or not. "Get over yourself." I had been fighting the diagnosis from day one. There was no way I was bipolar. I just could not accept it. I began the journey of the inner workings of bipolar disorder, and how I came to believe. Whether I liked it or not.

I had choices, find a way to live with it. Or let it destroy me. I did not make the right ones for a very long time. I became a substance abuser, any substance was fine. Hard liquor, and pain killers being my number one drugs of choice. I have lived in the mental hospital, rehab, and a halfway-house. I eventually ended up on disability after going through more jobs than I can count. Never remaining stable long enough to stay in one place, or having an episode and calling in sick way to often. Causing misadventure at work during a manic episode resulting in insubordination. And eventually getting fired.

So here I am today still on disability, fairly stable most of the time. I say fairly because I have OCD as well, and I still have break-through bipolar episodes. I still struggle with believing I am bipolar. Fighting the stigma along the way. It has always been my goal to fit in from the first day I was diagnosed. I have never felt normal since K-5 when I decided talking was overestimated. From that time on I would not speak until third grade. But these days having been through so much it is to the point it doesn't matter what people think. It is their perception, not mine. But in reality it is far deeper than that.

I never wanted to be different, but I always thought that way. So I acted like I felt, imagine that? If I acted small enough no one could see me, or notice what I was doing. I would actually pretend I was an object all through my childhood. That is how I survived my unpleasant young adult life as well. As long as it was not me I made it through. All this among whatever bipolar episode I was having. If I was not manic, I was depressed. If I was not either of those I was mixed, that being manic and depressed at the same time. A real pleasure to say the least. Especially for people around me. I am sure they wanted to disown me, or lock me away forever.

So all this brings me to now, believing my diagnosis. Do I know I am bipolar? Yes - because I learned the hard way. Ironically to this day I cannot bypass the wild card. What If? Well maybe this time nothing will happen. I always have that in the back of my head. I use to think I was pretending that too. Because I was told to get over it. It was just for attention. Well if this were true, than sweet Jesus give me some attention.

Please! The sad part being I only obviously wanted the most attention when I was not taking my medications. So I apparently was a non medicated attention monger seeking cannot get off the crazy train goofwad. It has always been excessively difficult for me to accept this diagnosis. You have bipolar 1 with mixed episodes. And your obviously OCD. I can almost remember each time I was diagnosed, each doctor's name. Almost but not quite. I remember the third psychiatrist I saw, I was in one of my long hospital stays, he told me I was a perfect textbook case of bipolar 1 he ever observed. Am I supposed to be proud of that? Cool, I get a plaque for nut of the month and a special parking space.

This went on for a few years. Because I kept moving. Each doctor confirmed the last doctors diagnosis. I would always end up in the hospital for manic episodes, so there was no hiding it. There was so many overdoses, alcohol poisoning, suicide attempts, then the depressions were hard to hide. Suicide attempts, sorrow, and outrageous behavior prevented me from going to work. I just kept repeating the bad patterns over and over. Until I finally settled into getting serious about my illness, and taking the role of driving myself to wellness.

Accepting a bipolar diagnosis...
Accepting a bipolar diagnosis...

Some simple strategies to manage bipolar disorder

  • Take your medications - All the time. Every day. Even if you feel better, because that means the medication is working.
  • Get enough sleep -Try to have a routine here. Otherwise your rhythm is most likely going to be out of whack. Lack of sleep can often trigger a manic episode. Proper sleep is good for you.
  • Watch your diet - Eat healthy foods. Use sugar, high in fat foods in moderation. Go easy on the caffeine, this is easier said than done. Moderation is the key.
  • Exercise - As much or as little as you can tolerate. If you can get outside that is even better. Fresh air and sunshine will do wonders especially if you are feeling depressed. Shoot for some form of exercise at least once a day. Walk, gardening, take a bike ride, walk to the mailbox, whatever, just move your butt.
  • Steer clear of drugs and alcohol - That is just asking for trouble. Self medicating gets you nowhere pretty fast. If you are taking bipolar medications and drinking or taking street drugs that is a huge recipe for disaster. I know, I in my stupidity apologized many times to loved ones for accidentally over dosing. It isn't worth the embarrassment to say the least.
  • Therapy - Do yourself a favor and talk to a therapist. Because having bipolar there is always something you will have to talk about. The sheer magnitude of dealing with mood swings are horrendous, and a therapist can guide you through the rough patches. And it isn't really fair to your family and friends to whine to them. They have enough to deal with, so give them a break and talk to a therapist instead. If you aren't into the therapist thing, find support online, or hospitals often have support groups for people with bipolar or mental illness.
  • Hobbies - Find some. You need to have something you enjoy doing. Going to movies, photography, writing, knitting, standing on your head, anything, something you enjoy doing outside of work. If you don't work you definitely need to have an outlet as well. Start scrap-booking, writing a journal, a short story about your illness, make jewelry, watch TV shows, anything that makes your heart skip a beat.


Living with bipolar disorder is not easy. Doing the above mentioned tips are not easy. Trial and error become your friend. You can live with this illness, some people can find enough stability to continue to work, and yet others cannot. They do better not under the pressure of the daily expectations of a job. So either way it is possible to live a full life, as long as you put in the work, take medications, deal with the fact you have bipolar, understanding your triggers, and continue with a healthy routine.

There is always that nagging voice inside my head, that says "just one more time, you don't need those meds, try it and see." But I have so much chaos already, I do not need more, so I learned from past mistakes and continue to stay on the medication. I just want to feel normal and not unbalanced around other people. I ask myself often, "why should it matter what other people think?" It should not. And that is where it begins, stigma no more.

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Comments 13 comments

crazybeanrider profile image

crazybeanrider 3 years ago from Washington MI Author

I know many people use the word bipolar to describe bad moods, and even the weather. I am sorry your work mates give you such a hard time. Just because you have some bad moods doesn't mean you are bipolar. If you think you may have a problem with mood swings it can't hurt to seek out therapy or a psych doctor to help you get diagnosed. But because you get angry does not equate bipolar. I know people who shift moods from happy to mad, and they aren't bipolar. So you hang in there and don't let them bully you. Thank you so much for reading and taking the time to comment. I appreciate it.


crazybeanrider profile image

crazybeanrider 3 years ago from Washington MI Author

I am glad you are reading all you can about bipolar. It is often a hard road to travel.I am sorry your mother didn't want you to know about the illness that found you. I will check out your hubs as well, I am glad you found mine and happy you liked them. Thank you. I am always searching and trying to earn more.


crazybeanrider profile image

crazybeanrider 3 years ago from Washington MI Author

Thank you. Bipolar is a struggle, but with work and a life long plan it can be battled. Not always a joy thats for sure. But I try my best to keep track of my moods and if educating someone with my story helps them I am glad. I am doing well right now, thank you so much.


Maria Cecilia profile image

Maria Cecilia 3 years ago from Philippines

Thanks for this, officemates thought I was bipolar because they thought I suddenly shifted from being in a good mood to being angry, but it was a one sided judgement then because for one I really don't get angry without any reason at all. Thanks for this, I will read this from time to time, I think some people need to know deeper about this case...


Diane Woodson profile image

Diane Woodson 3 years ago from Evansville, Indiana

ying the disorder Bipolar. I also have it and well, now that I know more about what it is I am happier. I know its rough, sympathyze with you. Please read what I write about this and I will read yours. It is again great that you are learning and researching it, my Mother did not want me too, they always tried to shield me from the truth of it, which is worse, but they did not know....Best Wishes to you honey.Hi I am happy you are stud


Minnetonka Twin profile image

Minnetonka Twin 3 years ago from Minnesota

It's been awhile since I read this hub and it just pulled me in again. This is so full of great advice from you and I love your down to earth way of presenting this issue. No one can give advice better than someone that's been there. I am sharing this on twitter and hubpages. Voted up and hit many buttons. I hope life has been good for you. God Bless.


crazybeanrider profile image

crazybeanrider 3 years ago from Washington MI Author

You are welcome, I am always happy to share my experience with mental illness, I am gld to meet others who understand and can pass that on as well.


Jennifer Bart profile image

Jennifer Bart 3 years ago from Texas

Thank you so much for writing this hub! I myself am being treated for this illness and I appreciate you writing about it.


crazybeanrider profile image

crazybeanrider 5 years ago from Washington MI Author

Thank you for your understanding Highvoltagewriter! It means a lot, people who are not bipolar who give those of us who are half a chance.


Highvoltagewriter profile image

Highvoltagewriter 5 years ago from Savannah GA.

Great, great hub! For even though I am not Bipolar I know many who are! Writing about your condition is a very important thing for you to do!


crazybeanrider profile image

crazybeanrider 5 years ago from Washington MI Author

Minnetonka Twin and lorlie6- Thank you both for your kind compliments. I am so happy what I write encourages or makes people see bipolar is real and manageable.

I agree that bipolar has become fashionable. I am seeing just about everybody getting a bipolar diagnosis even when it is clear they are not.

Thank you both for reading and taking the time to comment. I really do appreciate it.


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 5 years ago from Bishop, Ca

Hi cbr-I really enjoyed this walk through your bi-polar world. I've also been diagnosed and really don't find the stigma to be much of a problem. It seems it's become 'fashionable' to be bi-polar, maybe just in my area, but many folks are 'coming out' and talking about their meds, etc.

Your advice is timeless and I hope you have better tomorrows!


Minnetonka Twin profile image

Minnetonka Twin 5 years ago from Minnesota

Thanks for another inside look at bi-polar. You will help so many people that are struggling with the same things. You are an inspiration and I know this is not an easy life, even when you are trying to do everything right. I pray that you have more peace these days.

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