The Pros and Cons of Fruit And Veggie Peels

Nutrition Facts of Fruit and Vegetable Peels

There are a number of health benefits for fruit and vegetable peels. Now let’s come to know more about what you could miss out on by peeling fruits and vegetables. If you do not eat fruits or vegetables regularly, you are certainly short-changing your health and missing out on low-calorie and delicious ways of adding more food onto your plate at the same time. Fruit and vegetables peels come with various benefits.


The peels of fruit and vegetables are healthy too!

Even when fruit and vegetable peels are safe for consumption, they are generally discarded in the majority of common fruits and vegetables. They should always be eaten unpeeled, if possible, to give you the full nutrients. Indeed, the peel is being recognized as one of the essential components of our diet as it contains many vital nutrients and non-nutrient compounds, which play an important role in well being.

Health Benefits of Fruit and Vegetable Peels

There are a number of health benefits for fruit and vegetable peels. Now let’s come to know more about what you could miss out on by peeling fruits and vegetables. If you do not eat fruits or vegetables regularly, you are certainly short-changing your health and missing out on low-calorie and delicious ways of adding more food onto your plate at the same time. Fruit and vegetables peels come with various benefits.


  • Higher concentration of anti-oxidants such as anthocyanin pigments, tannins, catechins…etc are found in the peel, than in their flesh pulp in some of the common fruits like blueberries, grapes, guava, and kumquat. yellow color fruitsare rich in xanthin, carotenes and lutein pigments while Blue or purple colour fruit peels have anthocyanidin glycosides. Major components of these pigments are present just underneath the skin.
  • According to research from Japan, six separate antioxidant compounds are contained in garlic skin. Phenylpropanoid antioxidants which help fight the ageing process and protect the heart, are removed if garlic cloves are peeled.
  • The hairy skin of kiwi fruit contains three times the antioxidants of the pulp; and thought to have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergenic properties. It also fights off bugs such as Staphylococcus and E-coli, which are responsible for food poisoning.
  • 100 grams of unpeeled apples have about 16 mg of vitamin C and 12 mg of folate while the same amount of peeled apples has only 8 mg and 5 mg. Apple peels contain natural chemicals that can help lower cholesterol, control blood sugar and even protect against cancer.
  • The potato skins are very healthy as it is a real nutritional powerhouse. They're a good source of fiber, iron, potassium and b vitamins. One fist-sized potato skin is enough to provide you with half your daily recommended intake of soluble fibre, potassium, iron, phosphorous zinc and vitamin C. They are perfect for anyone looking to ward off colds as it contains more vitamin C than oranges
  • The peel of oranges contains higher levels of vitamin C than in its juice. 100 g of fresh orange-peel provides 136 mg per 100 g of vitamin C while its flesh contains only about 71 mg/100 g. Orange rinds also contain chemicals that are vital in cancer prevention. This anti-cancer component is called d-limonene and is currently being studied as a cancer-fighting agent. It is this component that gives oranges their very citrus-like smell.
  • Certain compounds in passion fruit peel has bronchodilator effect and can help relieve bronchospasm in asthma patients. A recent study suggested that the purple passion fruit peel extract reduces wheeze and cough and improves shortness of breath in adults with asthma.

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Automatic Peeler Machine Demo

How to Use Peel

If foods must be chopped up then they should be washed beforehand. Washing afterwards means that the nutrients are washed away. Foods should best be processed directly after cutting them as chopping destroys the cell structure, which fosters the loss of vitamins. For example, chopped cabbage or grated apples that sit around for two hours lose up to 62 percent of their vitamin C compared to the uncut product.

The best way of slowing the loss of vitamin C is drizzling the cut pieces with vinegar or lemon juice and storing them in a cool place. Stewing vegetables is recommended to maintain as much vitamin C as possible. Stewing means cooking the food with very little water.

Multiple insecticide sprays are common in the field fruits. Certain amounts of this may be deposited deep in their skin as well as pulp. So wash thoroughly before use. Organic farmed fruits are, therefore, recommended for safe use of the peel.

Some fruits and vegetables have peels, rinds or skins that are bitter. So they are usually eaten without their outer rinds. Look at the points below to find out how to have the peels without throwing them away.

  • Kiwi fruit

Gold kiwi fruit is much sweeter and has less hairy skin when compared to the regular kiwi skin. It is found to have the same benefit and use the skin if you are juicing the fruit.

  • Pine apple

Press and crush the core of pine apple and add the juice to smoothies. The left-over pulp can also be added to soups or casseroles for extra fibre since it can be stingy.

  • Broccoli

Broccoli stalks are rich in calcium and vitamin C. Shred the stalks of Broccoli into thin strips and add to stir-fry or serve steamed.

  • Bananas

The banana peel extract is rich in serotonin, the mood-balancing chemical. The skin also contains the antioxidant lutein which protects eye cells from exposure to ultraviolet light.

Boil the banana peel for 10 minutes and drink the cool water or put it through a juicer and drink the juice.

  • Potatoes

Bake whole potatoes as jackets. Boil and mash with the skin on, or slice into wedges. Toss it in a little olive oil and bake for potato wedges.

How To Peel A Pineapple

Fuuit and Vegetable Peeler Poll

When you peel with a peeler, Do you push the peeler away from you or pull it toward you?

  • Away
  • Towards
  • I use electronic peelers
  • I don't Know
See results without voting
Chemicals in Fruit and Veggie
Chemicals in Fruit and Veggie | Source

Hazardous Chemicals in Fruit and Veggie Peels

The soft, shiny red exterior of tomatoes or the lush, green texture of peas and leafy veggies might tempt one’s taste buds and their freshness might appeal to the eyes. But there lies something sinister beneath. It is the toxic concoction of hazardous chemicals.

In order to accentuate coloration and freshness, chemicals such as copper sulphate, rhodamine oxide, malachite green and the deadly carbide are commonly used on them. These are neurotoxic causing Alzheimer’s and dementia and are also carcinogenic. They speed up the ageing process too.

The vibrant green exterior of green peas and chillies are a result of the unscrupulous use of malachite green, a textile dye, a well known carcinogen. Other green vegetables such as lady’s finger, bitter gourd and the other gourd varieties are given a facelift by being washed in copper sulphate, which is commonly known as blue vitriol.

Copper culprit

Copper sulphate is a major constituent of fungicides in agriculture and its ingestion affects the liver and kidneys and causes the formation of free radicals in the body which augment the ageing process. Rhodamine B, which is a carcinogen, imparts the bright red hue to cherries. This dye is used in markers and also as an agricultural pesticide. It is a skin irritant. Raw mangoes are laced with carbide, which is used in the steel industry resulting in neural problems and is also a carcinogen. Petroleum oil is rubbed on the surfaces to provide a glazed look to vegetables. Petroleum oil’s toxic effects include respiratory and gastrointestinal problems. Thorough washing of the surfaces of fruits and vegetables is advised to get rid of the chemicals.

So before enjoying the skins and peels of both fruits and vegetables, be sure to wash them off. Don’t use soap or detergent to wash them. All you need is cold water and a little elbow grease. All the fruits and vegetables should be edible if they are grown without chemicals and pesticides.

Fruits and vegetables lose most of their nutrient value when cut and washed. So it’s advisable to eat them along with their peels or skin. Sometimes their fresh look could be due to the hazardous chemicals used in them.

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Comments 11 comments

vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 3 years ago from Peru, South America

Very useful--before reading this, I would've said that we always eat the peel. But then I realized that I don't eat kiwi fruit skin. So now I'm going to wash it well and throw the whole fruit into our smoothies. I don't think I would be able to eat the hairy skin without blending or juicing, though. I've voted this up and shared it. Thanks!


vertualit profile image

vertualit 3 years ago from Bangladesh

Useful article, thanks for sharing..


Tom Schumacher profile image

Tom Schumacher 3 years ago from Huntington Beach, CA

Nice hub! I love fruit and veggies. When able I usually eat everything; well, except for apple cores. As for bananas, I freeze them whole and when ready for a protein blended drink I cut one of them into pieces, peel and all, and add them to the concoction. I found it's delicious with chocolate protein powder, rice milk, water, almonds or mixed nuts, and a large spoonful of peanut butter. Voted up!


Careermommy profile image

Careermommy 3 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

This was a very interesting read. I am all for organic and all-natural. At a minimum, I will remember to stick to organic when it comes to tomatoes peas. Thanks for the insight.


Kevin Peter profile image

Kevin Peter 3 years ago from Global Citizen Author

Hi vertualit,

Very glad to find that you found the hub useful.


Kevin Peter profile image

Kevin Peter 3 years ago from Global Citizen Author

Hi Tom,

I loved the way you eat bananas. It sounds great. Thanks for sharing this information.


Kevin Peter profile image

Kevin Peter 3 years ago from Global Citizen Author

Hi Careermommy,

Natural things are the best for our health. I hope the information in the hub will help you.


sarcasticdomestic profile image

sarcasticdomestic 3 years ago

Like vespawoolf, I can't handle eating kiwi skin, but I love the idea of tossing the whole thing in a smoothie. Great idea! And thanks for the other great tips, Kevin Peter. Nice article.


Kevin Peter profile image

Kevin Peter 3 years ago from Global Citizen Author

Hi sarcasticdomestic,

I too loved the idea put forward by vespawoolf. Never forget to have them washed. Thanks for your comment.


Peyton Walker profile image

Peyton Walker 3 years ago

Cool! I want one of those automatic peelers. They look easy to use and I get tired of peeling manually!


Kevin Peter profile image

Kevin Peter 3 years ago from Global Citizen Author

Hi Peyton Walker ,

You can try the E bay and Amazon products links given in the hub

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