Kombucha: The Great Detoxifier

What Is Kombucha?

Kombucha is a fermented (but non-alcoholic) tea that is usually made by adding a colony of yeast and bacteria to either black or green tea, mixed with sugar. This liquid is then stored in a jar for about a week.

This drink has long been enjoyed in most of the eastern world (especially Russia and Asia). The western world is just now beginning to accept the unusual taste and to take advantage of the many health benefits of kombucha. Here are just a few.

Antioxidants

Because kombucha is commonly made with black or green tea as the liquid base, it contains the antioxidant benefits of these teas.

The antioxidants in green and black tea have been shown to prevent all sorts of serious diseases, including cancer and heart disease.

Acetic Acid and Usnic Acid

The fermented tea also has a high concentration of acetic and usnic acids. 

They help strengthen the immune system, giving the body an advantage in the fight against any number of common illnesses.

Butyric Acid

Another healthy acid that can be found in kombucha is butyric acid. Interestingly, this same acid is present in both cheese and vomit.

Butyric acid is a known cancer fighter and promoter of healthy cells. Clinical evidence for its effects on colon cancer is especially promising.

B Vitamins

B vitamins can be found in plentiful supply in this drink. These vitamins enhance the body’s metabolic function. They have also been shown to improve a number of other systems in the body, including the muscular system, circulatory system, and the nervous system. B vitamins even make your skin look better.

Most importantly, though, these vitamins are also cancer fighters. They dramatically reduce your risk of getting one of the most deadly types of cancer - pancreatic.

Gluconic Acid

The major detoxifying power of kombucha comes from gluconic acid. This heavy-duty substance has been used for decades to remove toxic metals from the body. And it’s good that gluconic acid is able to do this.

Toxic metals, even if not ingested in lethal doses, can cause all kinds of damage to the nervous and circulatory systems - especially in fetuses and very young children.

Some Cautions

Be judicious in your consumption of kombucha. See how your body reacts to a little bit before you drink very much. Some people have experienced upset stomachs from the fermented tea, and some have had even more serious allergic reactions.

Another thing you might need to worry about is contamination. The Internet has lots of web sites that tell people how to make their own home-grown kombucha, and this poses many health risks since the tea is not prepared in sterile conditions. You might be safer buying your kombucha from an established company, like Synergy.

There is another brand, Yogi, that provides its kombucha in extract form, mixed into bags with green tea. It doesn't have the hard-to-handle vinegar taste of regular kombucha, and you don't have to worry about the safety of the product. It's just like any other tea that comes in bags.

If you've never tried kombucha before, I suggest going this route, just to give it a try. If you're still nervous about trying it, you can always stick to regular, unfermented, black or green tea. And, if you're trying to cut down on caffeine, try delicious red tea (rooibos). You won't get as many health benefits, but you'll still get all the antioxidant power of kombucha - without all the worry.

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Comments 4 comments

L.L. Woodard profile image

L.L. Woodard 5 years ago from Oklahoma City

Interesting information, but think I will stick with my green tea.


workingmomwm profile image

workingmomwm 5 years ago from Kentucky, USA Author

Thanks, L.L. I can't say I blame you! :-)


Gail Meyers profile image

Gail Meyers 3 years ago from United States

I make my own kombucha and drink it. It's pretty easy to make your own and it is a fraction of the cost. I have never noticed contamination being an issue.


workingmomwm profile image

workingmomwm 3 years ago from Kentucky, USA Author

Thanks for the input, Gail. :-)

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