Waist to Height Ratio Better than BMI for Checking Body Fat

Most people and their doctors recommend BMI, which measures weight against height, to assess whether they are overweight and at risk of diseases and obesity.

BMI stands for Body Mass index, which is defined as the body mass divided by the square of the body height. It is generally expressed in units of weight in kg/ height in meters (squared).

If inches and pounds are used, the results can be converted to the standard BMI by multiplying by 703, which is the conversion factor [(kg/m2)/(lb/in2)].

BMI has been criticised recently for being inaccurate and inappropriate and various modifications have been applied. The index is confusing and very hard to understand.

Recently a simple rule of thumb has been suggested as an alternative. People should simply checking that their waist circumference is less than half their height. You don't even need a tape measure for this, just a piece of string.

The ratio of waist circumference to half height is an excellent way of monitoring weight status. It is more accurate and reliable than BMI and much easier to undertand.
The ratio of waist circumference to half height is an excellent way of monitoring weight status. It is more accurate and reliable than BMI and much easier to undertand. | Source
BMI has been shown to be inaccurate and hard to measure. It has been replaced by the much simpler waist to half height ratio.
BMI has been shown to be inaccurate and hard to measure. It has been replaced by the much simpler waist to half height ratio.
Excess weight on the hips and thighs is a risk for women.
Excess weight on the hips and thighs is a risk for women. | Source
Belly fat is a risk for men. The 'piece of string' method directly scores this risk
Belly fat is a risk for men. The 'piece of string' method directly scores this risk | Source

Piece of String Method for Checking Weight Status

► Put a piece of string under your foot and extend it to the top of your head.

► Grab the top mark with your fingers and then fold the string in half.

► If the folded string does not reach all the way around your waist you are overweight and at risk.

Critics of BMI, and there are many, say that it can overestimate the dangers of excess weight for people who have large muscle mass or heavy bone structures. More importantly BMI can often miss people with ‘apple shapes’, 'pear shapes' or who have big bellies in men, and excess fat on the hips of women. BMI may also be unsuitable for children and teenagers.

Excess levels of fat around their waist and hips has been recognised as a significant health risk for men and women.

A recent research study confirmed that the 'piece of string' method was more reliable.

About 3000 people were measured by the two methods and their health status checked. The study found that 30% classified as ‘normal’ using the BMI method were classified as 'at risk' by the 'piece of string' method.

The benefits of the 'piece of string' method are:

► The string method is much simpler and easier for people to understand.

► The string method focuses people's attention on the right area of the body that causes the risk.

► Muscle weighs more than fat. So people who have more muscles, genetically or through working out, will have BMI scores higher than they really are. Athletes and muscular people are not overweight or fat.

► An Olympic 100 meter sprinter, who is 6 ft (2m) tall and weighs 200 lbs (90 kg) may have the same BMI score of 26 as an overweight person with the same height and weight who does no exercise. BMI confuses muscles and bone mass in the athlete, with fat in the couch potato.

► The 'piece of string' method is more accurate, easier to understand is ideally suited for mass screenings through the population.
The authors say that waist height is far more accurate and easier for screening large populations that BMI.

© 2015 Dr. John Anderson

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Comments 3 comments

diogenes profile image

diogenes 19 months ago from UK and Mexico

Interesting and very useful article which also answers the question, "How long is a piece of string!"

Bob


cathylynn99 profile image

cathylynn99 19 months ago from northeastern US

ha, ha, diogenes.


glassvisage profile image

glassvisage 18 months ago from Northern California

This is very timely for me to stumble upon as I just discovered I have gained 20 pounds since last year, but my dress size has stayed the same! My friends have come across this question when they are measured around their waists, necks, etc. to see if they meet regs, but if they are very muscular, that counts against them due to the measurement system used!

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