You Don't Need To Grow Old....But There's A Catch

Follow the path which leads to continuing good health.

Yes, exercise, but also keep the body core warm.
Yes, exercise, but also keep the body core warm. | Source

Live long enough and we will surely grow old(er).

There's a catch.

"If you don't want to grow old, you have to be a good steward of your body." ~ Chao Saignavongs Southakrakoumanh (1832-1947) one of the last kings of Laos.

According to his family, when he partook of mortal death in 1947 he was still strong and healthy at 115! (Others say "at 102" but even they agree that he was still strong and healthy.)

Having blest his children and prophesying their futures, he simply went over and lay down beneath a small shrine built into one wall of "the silent room" of the palace where he and his family, and visitors from all faiths gathered three times a day to meditate and pray, folded his arms, and he was gone, on the day and at the hour he had prophesied weeks earlier.

What does it take "to be a good steward of your body" and live out what he described as "the fullness of my time"?

According to his granddaughter Manolie Nettavongs Jasper, it means at least "listening to your body, eating in moderation from a variety of healthy foods, avoiding avoidable stress, exercising routinely, avoiding tobacco smoke and strong alcoholic drinks, avoiding becoming dehydrated, enjoying deep, restful sleep, and forming lasting friendships."

It doesn't seem a stretch to consider that pain is simply the body's signal that something is wrong and needs proper attention.

A toothache, headache, belly ache, sore back, tender sinuses, cramps, and the whole variety of painful movements are just such signals, each one with logical next steps to be taken.

We are mortal, human beings with various outlooks on life and death. One thing is sure: how we each care for our own body makes all the difference in just how we age and how successful we are in preserving strength and health to the fullness of our own time here on earth.

Wise Benjamin Franklin was troubled by gout in his senior years, but offered some sage advice when he said, "You can exercise now, or pay for it later." We can all ponder that one when we our out taking our next walk.

__________

© 2013 Demas W. Jasper All rights reserved.


Wise steps taken now can give each of us a longer lifetime of beautiful sunsets enjoyed in optimum health.
Wise steps taken now can give each of us a longer lifetime of beautiful sunsets enjoyed in optimum health. | Source

More by this Author


6 comments

NateB11 profile image

NateB11 2 years ago from California, United States of America

Sounds like very natural and good wisdom: Just paying attention to the body and doing what's necessary to take care of it and not abuse it; being aware.


annart profile image

annart 2 years ago from SW England

Yes indeed; looking after our bodies, listening to our bodies messages, is so important. I wonder when I see so many more obese people (many children) these days, what their lives will be like in a few years' time. Their hearts, legs, lungs and so much more will be strained beyond their natural limits and often it's too late to mend any damage. I find stress is a big contributor to feeling 'off-colour', along with dehydration; no one seems to drink enough water and it's so easy for those of us who are lucky enough to have it on-tap! Good message.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 2 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

Thanks NateB11 for the affirmation and comment. Friday I had a routine visit with my cardiologist just following up on June surgery that has been so successful. While sitting and waiting for the appointment the room gradually filled with a wide range of patients young and mostly older, all needing expert help with their hearts. I thought what help a video of that "parade of heart patients" could potentially provide by effectively cautioning viewers to do the things the American Heart Association is trying to urge all of us to do to better care for our hearts. The same would work for a diabetes waiting room to which patients are coming in blinded and missing limbs from that threatening condition. An ounce of prevention is surely worth avoiding the progression of such diseases.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 2 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

Right on annart. Parents, teachers, the medical community, and public officials have a responsibility to our nation's children to drive home the facts about overweight and obesity when the causes are not genetic, psychological, or driven simply by unwise choices. That applies to driving home the facts on wise choices, too.


annart profile image

annart 2 years ago from SW England

I now understand why you've been quiet for a while; I'm glad the surgery was successful for you and it's good to see you back. All the best to you for Christmas and the new year. Ann


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 21 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

It is now at least 20 months later and the "piggy valve" is still going strong! In my family that appears to be a genetic flaw, but a correctable one. When the doc says you have a heart murmur, ask him how loud it is. If you can hear it even at your ankles, it should surely be taken care of, unless you have a death wish. In that case you may want to take care of something else first!

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working