Could YOU Die From a Scraped Knee, a Sore Throat, or a Papercut? YES!! Learn How to Protect Yourself Now!

The Problem: Antibiotics Are No Longer Working

Previously curable diseases and minor injuries are killing more and more people every year in the United States. Minor injuries such as a skinned knee, that no one would expect to be terminal, are among the many minor injuries that more and more often are resulting in death. Diseases that once were curable with antibiotics – sinus infections, strep throat, ear infections, skin infections, food poisoning, and other bacterial infections, are developing into antibiotic resistant superbugs.

Since there is no longer a cure for the above listed ailments they can develop to the point of killing their host (that could be you, or someone close to you). That currently happens in the United States 23,000 times a year, (Centers for Disease Control). That is correct. 23,000 people in the United States die every year from the causes listed above, as well as from other infections and injuries that were once treatable and curable. The number -- 23,000 -- is growing, and unless a solution is found, it is expected that number will reach 10 million by the year 2050, (Medical Daily).

There is a solution, but the United States is slow to embrace it. Why? Developing new drugs and/or treatments is a very lengthy process. Most of the big pharmaceutical companies want something that will pay off quickly.

At the same time, physicians prefer a one-size-fits-all approach, and sometimes there isn’t any. In other words, they want a treatment or cure that is uniform, and suitable for application for people of many different ages and general physical conditions, as well as suitable for a wide variety of medical conditions. Bacterial infections are among those medical issues where there is no longer an easy fix.

Antibiotics provided a fairly simple solution to bacterial infections for many years and people have become dependent on them. Unfortunately, now antibiotics do not work for a lot or people, and the number of people they do not work for is getting larger everyday.

This is a Bacteriophage

Bacteriophage
Bacteriophage | Source

Bacteriophage Therapy Is Working In Europe

The solution that is working in Eastern Europe is not so easy and requires a bit more effort. American scientists and researchers have begun to work on turning the Eastern European solution into a solution here in the states too, but our Food and Drug Administration requires many documented studies before it will approve new cures for anything. Medical professionals want an easy magic pill that can be mass-produced, and bacteriophage therapy doesn’t work that way.

First a sample of the bacteria causing the problem must be taken from a wound, or sore throat, or wherever the problem is. Then the bacteria must be tested to determine what kind of bacteria it is. Usually there are several different bacteria causing the problem. Then a cocktail of sorts made up of bacteriophages is mixed up specifically for the bacteria present at the site of the medical problem. Not all bacteriophages work on all bacteria, and that is the reason testing to determine what bacteria are causing the problem is so important. To assure that the bacteriophages that will best destroy the bacteria are administered.

Bacteriophage Therapy is a very specific kind of treatment. Unlike antibiotics, it only kills specific bacteria, not all of bacteria that is present in the body of the person being treated with it. There are no ill side affects like there are for many people when antibiotics are administered because with bacteriophages all the bacteria are not destroyed the way they are when antibiotics are used. Only the bacteria causing the medical problem are destroyed.

Tailed phages are the most numerous organisms on Earth.

— Stephen T. Abedon, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Microbiol., The Ohio State University

Characteristics of Bacteriophages

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"As living organisms, phages are constantly changing and adapting in tandem with their host bacteria to kill them more effectively. Phage therapy could therefore eliminate the vicious cycle in which bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics, necessitating the development of new, even more powerful drugs, at which point the process begins all over again."

Popular Science

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WHAT DOES MRSA STAND FOR?

Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus

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How It Works

"Technically the word virus means poison, but bacteriophages in fact benefit humans and other animals as well as our eco-system and our planet. While bacteriophages are said to devour or eat bacteria, that is not entirely accurate. They invade, or infect the bacteria and take over its DNA for the purpose, not of eating the bacteria as food, but rather to use the bacteria to replicate themselves."

Prevention Magazine, February 15, 2015 issue

What are phages?

The word phage means something that devours. Bacteriophage specifies the type of phage that is being discussed – a phage that devours bacteria in this case.

A bacteriophage is a virus. It has no interest in devouring other viruses, and is useless against them, but when put in close contact with the right kind of bacteria -- and their preferences do vary according to the specific type of phage they happen to be, they will invade the bacteria, take over its DNA, and begin replicating itself until the bacteria bursts. So in fact they destroy the bacteria through their replication process, not by literally eating them.

There are thousands of different kinds of bacteriophages. Sometimes they mutate slightly and stop liking the same old bacteria and develop a preference for a different type, but since there are also thousands of different kinds of bacteria that make people sick, it is just a matter of getting them paired up correctly.

Bacteriaphages are among the good bugs you sometimes hear scientists and healthcare professionals talking about. Their preferred victims are the bad bugs you have heard these same people talking about. It is a matter of getting bacteriophages together with their favorite bacteria and that requires a bit of testing. It takes a little longer than simply writing and filling a prescription and popping some pills for a few days.

Bacteriophages are in fact very picky about which bacteria they use for replication. Once testing determines specifically what bad bacteria are making you sick it is just a matter of determining which good viruses to introduce to your system. The results are far superior to any antibiotic according to scientists who work in this field.

To introduce bacteriophages to your infection, a few drops of liquid containing thousands of these phages is dropped from an eye dropper, or sometimes sprayed onto the affected area. There is no pain involved. You will probably not notice any change for the first few days, but after 4 to 7 days you will see improvement as if by magic.

Essentially, just as bacteria sometimes infect humans, bacteriophages infect the bacteria, but they do not infect humans. Phages are everywhere. They are in soil, water, food, sewage, and the human digestive tract – anywhere bacteria are found. There are literally billions of them in our individual bodies and are for the most part benign to humans. They are everywhere bacteria can be found because bacteria are necessary to the reproduction of the bacteriophages.

Putting Deaths from Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria into Perspective

To put the figure 23,000 in prospective, be aware that about 33,000 people die from gunshot wounds every year in the U.S.

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Approximately 33,000 people die in automobile accidents in the U.S. every year, also.

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The number of auto fatalities is coming down every year, but that is not the case with gun related deaths or with antibiotic resistant bacterial infections that end in death. The statistics on both gun related and antibiotic resistant bacteria related deaths are rising.

What is Slowing the Process of Making Phage Therapy Available to All Americans?

Elizabeth Svoboda, writing for Popular Science, explains that it is the very thing that makes phages so effective, their ability to mutate, that is a big part of the problem.

U.S. regulatory agencies require documentation on the safety and effectiveness of a treatment or medication before the FDA will approve it.

The issue with phages is that they start an experiment with a particular set of characteristics, but may mutate and change those characteristics to better accomplish their purpose before the experiment can finish. This is worrying to FDA officials, because there is no certainty that one of these times the phages won’t mutate into something harmful to humans.

So far, the phages have never mutated into anything harmful to humans, and no adverse side affects have been experienced by test subjects as a result of phage mutations. Phages usually mutate in order to be more virulent against bacteria. Bacteria change in order to better resist the phages, and in turn the phages change to cancel the change the bacteria have made. It is a maddening circle as some people might say, but generally considered a good thing so that the phages are more successful in clearing infections.

There are very often more than one or two kinds of bacteria present in a wound or an infection. Indeed there are often hundreds of different types of bacteria at the site of an infection. Phages will sometimes mutate as a result of exposure to bacteria that is slightly different from their usual victims. That is one of the many advantages of phages. As bacteria mutate to strengthen their ability to exist and ward off the enemy phages, their nemesis mutate also, and as a result bacteria rarely if ever become resistant to phages.

Svoboda points out that Karen Riley, spokesperson for the FDA, has said that mutations during trials could cause an entire trial to be “scrapped,” even though test subjects had no adverse affects as a result of the mutations. Preventing phages from mutating could prevent them from doing the great job they do in ridding this planet of harmful bacteria. Yet to pass requirements by the FDA to be approved, they must not mutate. Basically, for bacteriophages to pass the rigorous requirements of the FDA in order to be approved, they must stop being effective. Yes, crazy.

Currently there is no way to prevent mutation from happening during a trial, and as a result of that, along with the FDA requiring every single phage (there are hundreds of thousands of them) that is used medically to be tested and documented, etc., it could take a very long time before phages are approved for use in the U.S..

Meanwhile, 23,000 people in the U.S. alone are dying every year while waiting for an approved treatment/cure for their affliction caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria . That number is rising steadily.

Eastern Europe Has Been Using Phages to Cure Infections for Over a Hundred Years

Svoboda writes in Popular Science that vials of fluid containing bacteriophages used to be sold in drugstores here in the United States up until the early 1940s. That practice stopped with the advent of penicillin, because penicillin was considered easier to use, and there was more money to be made on it.

While it is possible to randomly introduce many different types of bacteriophages to an infection expecting that some of them will be the right kind, results are usually quicker and better if the specific bacteriophage that prefers the bacteria present is introduced. That requires testing to see what kind of bacteria are present and complicates the process.

The FDA doesn’t trust anything that hasn’t survived its stringent requirements and reviews. However, Svoboda writes, “to the scientists working at the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology in the republic of Georgia, the medicine is as trusted as aspirin. Since 1923, when the facility was founded, scientists there have successfully treated millions of patients with phage therapy and presented more than 100 research abstracts at international conferences attesting to its clinical value.”

Like so many medications that have been tested and found safe and useful in Europe, but not allowed into this country because it has not been tested by our own scientists and doctors under the watchful eye of the FDA, this treatment is very rare in this country as yet, and likely to remain so for many years to come.

Svoboda writes about a doctor in Lubbock, Texas that is doing his best to make this treatment available to some of his patients as a last resort, while at the same time working with the FDA. Dr. Randy Wolcott spent several days at the George Eliava Institute in the Republic of Georgia learning all he could about the ‘serum’ and how to use it.

Instead of taking a couple of days, treatment may take several days, and even 2 weeks or more, but it does an amazing job for most people who undertake it. This may not sound ideal, but it starts sounding much better when you compare it to no treatment and ultimately death, which is the other option for most people. In fact, the last treatment (death) is the only treatment available for most Americans because they can’t afford to travel to Lubbock, or to the Republic of Georgia, for treatment.

For those people who may be confused, yes, we have a state named Georgia in this country, but that is not the Georgia I am referring to here. I am speaking of the Republic of Georgia bordering the countries of Turkey and Armenia among others. That could be an expensive trip for people with low paying jobs.

Just the same, it might be a good idea to start thinking about how you would handle a situation where antibiotic resistant bacteria were causing serious problems for yourself or a family member so that you will be prepared to act. There are some directions included here that could save your life or that of your loved one, and they can also be viewed in the February 2015 issue of Prevention Magazine.

For the sake of your family, I hope you will take a few minutes to read the articles both in Prevention Magazine and on the Popular Science website on which I have based this article. Hopefully the situation will get better soon, but until it does, it pays to be prepared. I promise you, ignoring this problem will not make it go away.

Share Your Opinion

Should the FDA Relax Its Policies Where Bacteriophages are Concerned To Save Lives?

  • Yes. This treatment is not new and has been proven over and over to be safe in other countries!
  • No. The reason our phamaceuticals are so safe in this country is because of the stringent requirements by the FDA.
See results without voting

What to Do if You Get MRSA

Some patients with a resistant infection can access phages without leaving the U.S., depending on the infection and its severity.

Here Is What You Do . . .

Patients register at phagetherapy.com and describe your problem. Then send that description along with medical records and a bacterial sample – urine, stool, or a swab. Further directions for sending will be given on the website.

Once received, your sample will be tested to see whether the infection is one that can be treated with a phage preparation.

Once the bacteria are identified and the correct phage or phage combination is isolated, a Phage Therapy Center doctor will prescribe a treatment that is prepared in Tbilisi, Georgia, and then shipped to your home. Phages generally come in liquid form and are applied topically, inserted as drops, or taken orally.

In severe cases, particularly with chronic conditions, patients travel to Eastern Europe for more extensive treatment. Costs range from $800 for a home–delivered preparation, or as much as $6,000 or more for treatment overseas, including travel. Some insurers cover a portion of the costs and some cover nothing at all.

Prevention magazine, February 15, 2015 issue.

Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia

Sources

Prevention Magazine, February 15, 2015 issue, “The Natural Superbug Cure No One Is Telling You About,” by Koren Wetmore.

http://korenwetmore.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Prevention-Phage-Therapy-2015.pdf


CDC on antibiotic resistant bacteria

http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/threat-report-2013/


Medical Daily

http://www.medicaldaily.com/antibiotic-resistance-will-kill-10-million-people-year-2050-report-shows-grim-future-316730


Phage-Therapy. Org

http://www.phage-therapy.org/writings/bacteriophages.html


Popular Science – The Next Phage

http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2009-03/next-phage

© 2015 C E Clark

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Comments 103 comments

Au fait profile image

Au fait 5 hours ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for stopping by and shining a light on this article. I hope your husband continues to ward off infections successfully and that you are both now and continue to be in good health. Take care my friend.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 5 weeks ago

Au fait, every time Honey Bunny gets a cut or scrape I have to read this again, he keeps saying I don't get infections.... but there is always a first time.

I hope all is well with you and your family.

Blessings and hugs my dear friend.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 8 weeks ago from North Texas Author

Kiss andTales, thank you for reading, and sharing your thoughts!


Kiss andTales profile image

Kiss andTales 2 months ago

Very excellent hub ! Very imformative ! Very valuble , because we all are faced with these death dealing situtions, even though I am more of and advocate to a cure of multiple things , crime , sickness , justice , againg , food shortages , family happiness ,

There is a cure for all of these at once ,

Notice !

Rev 21:4. And he will wipe out every tear from ttheir eyes, and death will no more ,neither morning nor pain be anymore.

The former things have passed away "

Yes have all experience something that has caused pain or sickness.

But we can be conforted to know it will all end.

Thank you Au fait !


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 2 months ago

Just came back to share this most interesting hub.

I hope all is well with you

Blessings and hugs my friend


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W., thank you for sharing this article! Take care . . .


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 months ago from Houston, Texas

Just noticed your comment from 3 months ago. Yes...the flooding down here was horrific! Now we look forward to rain as it is so very hot and dry most days excepting the humidity of course.

Those super bugs are scary! Sharing this important hub once again. Stay cool up there!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 6 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for stopping by. I hope you and John will both be careful not to get into a situation where you will need phages. Blessings and hugs . . . take care . . .


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 6 months ago

Au fait, I am back to share this important message again, you know that I am one who needed/needs this information on hand at all times.

Blessings and Hugs my dear friend.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 6 months ago from North Texas Author

RTalloni, thank you for reading this important article and for sharing your thoughts!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 7 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W., thank you for the share and the pin. Yes we're being taken over by super bugs. Heard about the awful flooding y'all are having down there. We're to have a week of rain again starting this coming Sunday so maybe you will too. I know neither one of us needs it.

Just got the a/c fixed in my car this morning in preparation for the hellish temps that are just around the corner. Hope all is well with you.


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 7 months ago from the short journey

Glad to see this highlighted again. The number of people contracting antibiotic resistant infections continues to rise. Though there are a number of reasons for this, protecting one's self is the first line of defense.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 7 months ago from Houston, Texas

My husband had a bad cut and scrape from a recent fall. Fortunately nothing adverse happened beyond that. Always a concern however. Will share once again and pin to Awesome HubPages. Hope you have been OK with those recent storms up in your area. So many people are suffering down here in Houston due to the flooding. Sad situation!


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 8 months ago

Au fait, only you could come up with this, I think about this hub every time I get a cut or scrape or an insect bit for that matter.

This should be a HOTD.

Hope all is well with you

Blessings and hugs dear friend.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 9 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for commenting and sharing this article again. MRSA is here to stay it would seem and it's not a matter of if one will get it, but when.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 9 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W., thank you for commenting and sharing this article again! Hope all is well with you. Best of luck with your new site. I look forward to checking it out!


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 9 months ago

I came back to share this again, hubby gets so many cuts and scrapes.

I hope all is well with you.

Blessings and hugs.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 9 months ago from Houston, Texas

There is always something regarding health care of which we need to be concerned. Now it is mosquitoes and the effects on pregnant women and their children. That would be a good hub for you to write. Hope you have a good Valentine's Day.

The new website is still being loaded but the person helping me has been ill and out of touch. Hopefully SOON it will be "live." It has been a long time since we started this! :(


Au fait profile image

Au fait 11 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for coming back and reading again. There is a lot of info here and I hope it will be helpful to people and maybe even save some lives. Take care . . .


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 12 months ago

You have so much information in this, every time I get a cut or scrape or splinter I have to come back and read this.

I hope all is well with you.

Blessings and Hugs.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 13 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W., thank you for sharing your thoughts on healthcare and for sharing this article!

My late husband had no insurance or money and it was doctors and hospitals who made the decision to do nothing. Being poor has very definite limitations.

The reason Obamacare isn't working very well in the Red states is because most Red state governors like our previous illustrious Mr. Perry refused to expand Medicaid in their states as they were supposed to do. Therefore those people who oppose healthcare for the poor will sleep well at night knowing that at least as many people are still dying as were dying before Obamacare, and possibly more.

I am the youngest of 5 and we were all born at home. Doctor came to our home. Think my mother said it cost about $5 for each of my sibs to be born. My youngest sister may have cost $8, I can't remember what Mother said about that. Maybe it was me that cost $8. I'm considerably younger than my sibs. Medical costs were much lower back then.

When my daughter was born 27 years ago doctors were charging in the vicinity of $5-6,000 and hospital costs were on top of that yet. I don't even want to think what the cost of childbirth is now, but I expect it would rival the cost of a wedding . . .


Au fait profile image

Au fait 13 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W., thank you for sharing your thoughts on healthcare and for sharing this article!

My late husband had no insurance or money and it was doctors and hospitals who made the decision to do nothing. Being poor has very definite limitations.

The reason Obamacare isn't working very well in the Red states is because most Red state governors like our previous illustrious Mr. Perry refused to expand Medicaid in their states as they were supposed to do. Therefore those people who oppose healthcare for the poor will sleep well at night knowing that at least as many people are still dying as were dying before Obamacare, and possibly more.

I am the youngest of 5 and we were all born at home. Doctor came to our home. Think my mother said it cost about $5 for each of my sibs to be born. My youngest sister may have cost $8, I can't remember what Mother said about that. Maybe it was me that cost $8. I'm considerably younger than my sibs. Medical costs were much lower back then.

When my daughter was born 27 years ago doctors were charging in the vicinity of $5-6,000 and hospital costs were on top of that yet. I don't even want to think what the cost of childbirth is now, but I expect it would rival the cost of a wedding . . .


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 13 months ago from Houston, Texas

I just now read your response to my comment 4 months back. So sorry to hear about your husband and others who may have been treated (or should I say NOT have been treated in time to make a difference) and in the end he died because of it. That is sad indictment of our medical system. Insurance companies seem to have more say in what happens these days rather than doctors. Unless they wish to work for free (and some do good charity work) their hands are often tied because the insurance companies have the final say as to what will be allowed to be done. Sadly Obamacare seems not to have improved the situation.

In the good old days PRIOR to most people having medical insurance, doctors worked for a fee or even took things in exchange for their services. When my youngest brother was born, the pediatrician actually took turns coming to my parents home holding my brother upright in the steam filled kitchen. He did it because he cared...not for money. Of course back then doctors also did house calls and really got to know the families and their patients. That was in a small Wisconsin rural area and in the 1950s. Certainly something to be said for that kind of care!

Sharing this again and wishing you well. Cooler temps are soon on the way!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 14 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for stopping by. People really need this information because for now there is no cure in this country for MRSA and other antibiotic resistant bacteria that can kill. Knowing about this treatment and how to get it can mean the difference between life and death for ourselves and those we love.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 14 months ago

Au fait, I am back to re-read and share this information that everyone should know about.

I hope that all is well with you and you have caught up on your sleep.

Blessings and hugs my fried.

p.s. will be working outside starting in half hour and have a council meeting tonight.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 14 months ago from North Texas Author

Moonlake, thank you for commenting and pinning this article. There is no cure here in the states for MRSA. It's one of this antibiotic resistant bacteria.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 14 months ago from America

When my husband was in the hospital they were always asking us if he had ever had MRSA. He hadn't. My mother did get it just before she died. She had to have her appendix removed and I guess that was when she got it in the hospital. She never got better.

My cousin also had it last year after having a stroke and while in the hospital. Pinned your hub to my health board.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 14 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for coming by and sharing John's story, and for sharing this article. It's definitely a serious subject and I hope people realize the seriousness of it before it's too late.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 14 months ago

Au fait, this is really good information in here. John was just telling me about a man he knew that got a scape on his hand and died 2 weeks later.

Hope all is well with you.

Blessings and Hugs my friend.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 14 months ago from North Texas Author

Mary (Tillsontitan), I think your article is very relevant and important and answers questions people have that this article does not. At the same time, I wanted to let people know that there is help available, but sadly not in this country. So many people are dying from antibiotic resistant bacteria these days and they don't need to. I wanted to help get the word out that there is help available to many people -- unfortunately not to the poor because if one has no available personal funds these solutions are inaccessible. Thank you Mary, for commenting and for your high praise!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 14 months ago from North Texas Author

Sunshine625, thank you for coming by and sharing your story! Nowadays it doesn't pay to take the risk that it may be more than just a little scratch. . .


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 14 months ago from New York

Au fait you never cease to educate us on topics that are important and relevant to all. As you may know I wrote a hub about how our society is becoming resistant to antibiotics due to their overuse, but I had no suggestions for treatment other than to stop that over use.

I had CDiff, which you often get from an antibiotic, but then it is treated with a special antibiotic! As for MRSA that has to scare anyone and everyone or at least should.

You've done your research, now maybe we should do ours!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 14 months ago from North Texas Author

MarleneB, thank you for reading and commenting on this article!

Jim Henson (Muppet creator) scratched himself while on a walk and was infected with a type of fast moving pneumonia. He died within hours.

Because we have no cure here in the states I mainly wanted to let people know how they could get phage therapy, which seems to be the only solution for MRSA.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 14 months ago from Orlando, FL

Excellent information! A neighbor had scraped his knee during a softball game, he died just 5 days later from MRSA...he refused to see a doctor, claiming it was just a cut and will heal. Left behind a wife and 3 young kids. It was very sad.


MarleneB profile image

MarleneB 14 months ago from Northern California, USA

This is a wonderful article explaining the subject of MRSA and Phage Therapy thoroughly. I know someone who got a tiny little scrape on his calf. The leg swelled up and a red line started running down his leg. The doctor said that if he had gotten there a minute later the doctor might have had to amputate the infected leg. Sometimes, these diseases can spread really fast. Thank you for sharing such knowledge with us. In many cases, education of such things is the best protection we have.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 15 months ago from North Texas Author

Georgialgal1984, thank you for reading and commenting on this article and for sharing your experience on this subject. I have included a section at the end telling people how they may be able to access this treatment in the event they fall victim to these antibiotic resistant bacteria. The number of needless deaths in this country from these bacteria is shocking. Thank you again for sharing your information on this subject.


georgialgal1984 profile image

georgialgal1984 15 months ago from United States

Very informative hub! I read a story about a woman with such bad sinus issues it was literally killing her, then she had the phages used on her for a short period of time and was completely healed! I believe the woman was from Texas and then treated somewhere in Europe. Thanks for sharing and I hope you have a great day and weekend~ :)


Au fait profile image

Au fait 16 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for stopping by. I don't think a lot of people take this issue seriously at this point and I'm afraid even more people will have to die before they do take it seriously. Thanks for the share. Stay cool and take care!


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 16 months ago

Au fait, I am back to share this again. every time I get a cut, I think about this hub. Not much time but wanted to share this again

Blessings and Hugs, stay cool.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 17 months ago from North Texas Author

Thanks for stopping Kristen.


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 17 months ago from Northeast Ohio

AU fait, this was a real interesting hub about how you could die from a paper cut and such from that deadly infection. Voted up!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 17 months ago from North Texas Author

Patricia (pstraubie48), thank you for sharing your brother-in-law's experience. I'm so sorry it didn't end better. I'm really hoping this article will get people to wake up and realize there is a real threat out there to themselves and their families, their children, etc. If one has a plan and is able to utilize some of the options in this article, should something unthinkable happen, it could save a life.

Thank you for the angels, and I do hope they are surrounding you and your family everywhere you go at every moment. Take care . . .


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 17 months ago from sunny Florida

So much here that all should know.

My brother in law died about five years ago from

'a simple cut'. He was exiting out of his home and scraped his foot on the doorway. It was not horrible really. It was treated as one would normally treat such an injury but it got no better. So in a few days he went to the doctor. Treatment continued but he got no better. One night he awoke in excruciating pain, was whisked off to the hospital, where he died five days later. MRSA had invaded his body, took over, and won.

(I omitted a lot of the story but this is the essence.) We were shocked and saddened by his passing. The home he lived in was 'spotless'...it was not a dirty environment is what folks need to understand. This can happen to anyone.

Thanks for sharing AuFait

Angels are once again on the way to you ps


Au fait profile image

Au fait 17 months ago from North Texas Author

Peachpurple, thank you for stopping by! MRSA is serious regardless of one's age or condition, though the very old, the very young, and people with chronic issues may be worse off in the long run.


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 17 months ago from Home Sweet Home

as we get older, it is better to be careful with our wounds. Thanks for yr hub to get us all know the seriousness


Au fait profile image

Au fait 17 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W., thank you for stopping by. Yes, the wealthy will always be able to afford things the rest of us can't, and that's fine with me. What I object to is the denial of basic lifesaving healthcare to people who aren't wealthy, in fact those living in poverty. My husband died because he was poor.

I have no health insurance or money and so my doc has told me more than once there's nothing he can do if I can't pay. Hospitals will fix you up in an acute situation good enough to send you out again, but that's it. No diagnosis of what may be causing trouble, so if you don't have something obvious you're on your own.

My husband's life could have been extended many years if he'd been given the basic care needed when his tumor first became known. He went to the doc the day after he noticed blood in his urine. That was the earliest available appointment. He wasn't given the necessary surgery that might have given him many more years because he couldn't pay. He was also treated badly as a human being because he was poor, as was my daughter when she visited him. This was at the Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. They let him suffer in excruciating pain for months at the end, because he was poor. Surly God is preparing a very, very special place for people responsible for this.

Many people seem to believe poor people, especially homeless people, were put on this earth to be abused, beaten, and set on fire. At the very least to be demeaned and sneered at.

The reason so many laws are being passed against being poor is because the better folks among us, those who are in their own minds at least superior even to Jesus, who was also poor and homeless, think they're too good to have to see or step over human trash as they think of us.

Basic healthcare should be available to everyone in this richest nation on earth. If the rich want to pay more for private rooms and an RN with 5 degrees to hold their hand, that's OK with me. I'm just saying everyone needs to have basic necessary healthcare as needed, and right now it is not available to poor and homeless people who don't qualify under current arcane laws for medicaid.

Our Mr. Perry refused to expand Medicaid as did most Republican governors in most Red States, and Mr. Abbott hasn't seen fit to change that. They no doubt treat their dogs better than they think poor people should be treated. After all their dogs are members of well off families, not shamefully poor human beings.

Yes, I've heard of some of the wealthy either giving now or agreeing to give their money to charities. I've also heard some of the wealthy (mainly Democrats) say their taxes ought to be raised since their secretaries are in higher tax brackets than they are. If they really believed that, there is nothing stopping them from writing a check to the U.S. Treasury, but so far none of them have done that I've heard about. Words are cheap . . .

There are 5,000 homeless veterans in Denton County alone, and that doesn't include homeless non-veterans. That's a lot, and I see no one making an effort to help. I hear a lot of talk, but see no action.

What exactly are these charities that the wealthy are leaving all their money to doing with that money? Paying their top CEO (like Liddy Dole previously of the Red Cross) a half a million in wages a year? That certainly kept her out of the bread lines because Bob was only making a hundred thousand or so when he retired. Good that the Red Cross was able to help her because of all the people I've talked to who have had dealings with the Red Cross, precious few ordinary people ever get help of any kind for anything. Most people I know would never contribute to the Red Cross, and because of all the awful things I've heard about it many times over, I never would either.

So before I pat them on the back and throw them a fish, I want to know exactly what charity they're giving to and exactly what is being accomplished.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 17 months ago from Houston, Texas

Even in some countries with healthcare for everyone...the wealthy still have better advantages. They can go anywhere in the world to the top notch doctors and hospitals for care. When I used to work at Methodist Hospital in the Texas Medical Center many years ago, they often had VIP's from around the world seeking treatment there. Am sure that they still do.

There are many things separating the super rich from the rest of us. Nice to know that some of them are giving away the majority of their fortunes to good causes....some, even while still alive. Warren Buffet, Bill Gates and other billionaires from around the world are doing it and others are signing pledges to do it upon their deaths. It is a growing trend. So many good causes to support worldwide!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

RTalloni, thank you for reading, commenting, pinning, and linking to this article! Of course you may link your article to mine and I'm honored for you to do so.

Yes, this is an important subject and I'm afraid before enough people take it seriously that serious things will happen more and more. I'm hoping people will take an interest as well as thinking about what they will do if they find themselves in a situation where antibiotics won't work and the alternative is unthinkable.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W, thank you for sharing your thoughts on this important issue and for the pin and the share. It's true that wealthy people have better access to just about everything including healthcare, but if we had universal healthcare like other civilized countries (even Cuba has it for heaven's sake), then everyone would have access to necessary healthcare, not just the wealthy, most of whom were born into their wealth and have done nothing to deserve the privileges it brings.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

DeborahDian, thank you for sharing your thoughts and for the votes and share! Yes, children will have more than the usual opportunities to get skinned knees and other injuries, etc. I hope they make Phage Therapy available here soon. It's awful to think so many people are dying from simple things that could be treated so easily.


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 18 months ago from the short journey

Glad to see this discussion on an important topic because it seems that not enough people are giving it the consideration it needs. Linking in my hub on Cipro if you have no objection and will pin when the system allows… Thanks for an informative and interesting read.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 18 months ago from Houston, Texas

Will pin this excellent article of yours to a different board this time and once again share. Our FDA needs to get serious about looking at this old remedy and making it available for us to use over here as quickly as possible. Good to know that there are alternative methods of gaining access to it if one has the financial means with which to do it. Wealthy people always have better options than those who are not wealthy.


DeborahDian profile image

DeborahDian 18 months ago from Orange County, California

With millions of children getting out of school for the summer, families headed out on camping trips, and teens spending days at the beach, this information is so important for everyone to have! Voted up and shared!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Georgescifo, thank you for reading and commenting. You are right to be worried and scared. The solution is available and has been for decades, but it isn't readily available in the U.S. We need it to be accessible right here right now. Without it, people are dying unnecessarily.


georgescifo profile image

georgescifo 18 months ago from India

This is really an alarming fact and feeling afraid that the chances are now high of facing death due to minor injuries and cuts. Hope that the medical industry comes up with something more to tackle this issue in the long Run.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Pinto2011, thank you for sharing that information about your friend and for commenting on this article. Most of us learned in elementary school that one shouldn't share certain things like mascara, lipstick, hairbrushes, towels, and the like. It's sad that your friend died, but sharing certain things can invite nasty infections even if they don't kill you.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Word55, so good to see you again and thank you for coming by and saying such nice things. I do try to be thorough with the research because I think being informed is so important. I hope the word will get around that there is some help available because people are being given the terminal diagnosis everyday and they need to know that there may be help if they just know where to find it.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W, good to see you and hope all is well there! Thank you for reading and commenting on this article. Yes, things need to change a little I think. While I believe the FDA's policies and procedures are sensible for the most part, I do think forcing fish to climb trees in order to prove they are safe and effective makes no sense. Altering the fish so that they can fall in line with the FDA's requirements and climb trees but as a result no longer swim, makes no sense either.

Bacteriophages are unique and it is that uniqueness that makes them useful against bacteria. Forcing them to pass the same tests other drugs pass and changing their beneficial properties so they can do that makes no sense.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for coming by. I know your migraine has improved since you wrote this and I hope you haven't gotten another one. While you're taking a picture of the dip stick why not include the road runner? You could write a sister story to go along with the groundhog. I think it would be interesting to read about a roadrunner building a nest under the hood of a truck.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

DeborahDian, thank you for stopping by. Good to see you again! It is a shame, because in this case 23,000 people and rising are dying in this country because we have no solution to the MRSA problem. Other countries have been using bacteriophage therapy for decades and it works.


pinto2011 profile image

pinto2011 18 months ago from New Delhi, India

This is a great learning experience going through your article. Recently, a woman died just because of contracting infection from her friend's eyeliner.


word55 profile image

word55 18 months ago from Chicago

Well done Au Fait, I think natural resources are the best remedies. Can't seem to go wrong with them and you always do thorough research. I'm glad that you love what you do.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Patricia (pstraubie48), thank you for reading, and for sharing your experience with MRSA that is unfortunately becoming more prevalent all the time. Thank you also for the votes and of course, for the sngels. I hope all is well with you.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

LongTimeMother, thank you for coming by and sharing your thoughts on this important subject. While the FDA does have to approve our drugs it has nothing to say about who receives healthcare or how much the care, or the drugs if any are involved, will cost. Healthcare providers and our congress make those decisions. Pharmaceutical companies that develop and manufacture the drugs set the prices for them. Healthcare providers set their prices for services. Congress decides who qualifies for Medicaid.

As for colloidal silver and aloe vera, I think it would be useless against MRSA. I hope you never have to contend with MRSA, but currently nothing we have in this country has much affect on it. If you have bacteriophage therapy available in Australia, that will be your best bet.

Thank you again for stopping by.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 18 months ago from Houston, Texas

Came back to see more interesting comments that this well researched hub of yours is getting. Hopefully our FDA will sanction the use of bacteriophages sooner rather than later. Hope you are having a good Memorial Day today!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for the votes and share. We've had so many storms I don't know which one you're talking about now. Last night we got 2 more inches of rain! I've survived the storms and so long as there are no tornadoes or hail, it should be OK. The awful heat is another matter, and it's on its way.

Hope you are both having a great holiday weekend and not spending it trying to bury the tractor. It s so muddy out there after all that rain that it makes no sense to even attempt to get through the mud.

Blessings and hugs to you both, Take care . . .


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

TIMETRAVEKER2, thank you for taking time to read this article and to share your knowledge of people you have personally known who have been victims of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Thank you for the vote also!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Torrilynn, thank you for stopping by!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Writer Fox, thank you for taking time to come by and read this article and to share your thoughts on this important subject. Very much appreciate your kind compliments too.

Most healthcare is only available to people with insurance or money as it is.

If you noticed, it is possible in some cases to have the phages mailed from Georgia over here sparing travel expense at least, if a person can even afford that.

I do think they have the wrong requirements for this particular treatment. Not everything is exactly the same nor should be in order to be effective. It should be speeded up too, given the number of deaths every year for lack of treatment.

Very much appreciate your candor and I hope the FDA and law makers are listening to you and others like ourselves who would like to see this treatment made available in this country without jumping through hoops. It's been used safely in Europe for decades and even used to be available here directly from the pharmacist.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Rebeccamealey, thank you for taking time to read and comment on this article. Antibiotics already aren't working for a lot of people. 23,000 deaths and rising is the proof . . .


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 18 months ago

Au fait, I woke with a migraine and sore throat yesterday and right away I thought of you and this article.

I sure hope all is well with you.

I must run and get things done and check the car. I think the Road Runner is building a nest inside the truck under the hood.

Oh well I will get ready to take a picture of the [710] and the dip stick.


DeborahDian profile image

DeborahDian 18 months ago from Orange County, California

Another well-researched article. This was so fascinating! Our FDA can be very slow to approve new procedures, including those that are doing well in other countries. That is such a shame.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Paul Kuehn, thank you for reading and commenting on this article and for the vote and shares. Hope you learned something useful and glad to hear your surgery was sufficiently successful to bring you back to HP!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W, thank you for reading and commenting on this article! Also for the share. I hope this article will help as many people as possible to find help if they are diagnosed with MRSA and told there is no solution for them.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Poetryman6969, thank you for coming by and commenting on this article! In many ways I think our government is so huge and unwieldy that no one knows what the right hand or the left hand are doing -- and maybe it's for the best. I hope this article will help as many people as possible to know what to do if they find themselves in a bad situation from MRSA.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Paula (Fpherj48), I understand all that you are saying and agree especially with your words, "Our best defense is education, awareness and personal responsibility." We really must be as knowledgeable as possible about our own bodies and the many threats to ourselves that are out there. I have always thought that blind trust, even in a physician, is dangerous.

Regarding the FDA, I think its mistake is in insisting all medications or treatments pass the same tests. That's like saying fish are useless because they fail the tree climbing exam.

Phages are not in the same category as most solutions to disease and in fact their ability to morph as their chosen bacteria morph in order to continue to be lethal to these bacteria is one of their greatest advantages. To pass the FDA tests they must not change during a study. Is that crazy or what?

Thank you Paula, for taking time to read, for sharing your thoughts, for your high praise, and for the votes.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Colorful one for reading and sharing your thoughts on this important issue. The FDA has been slow to approve drugs for decades. Likewise people without money or health insurance have been denied care for quite some time now. Some people much prefer letting people die over universal healthcare for all. I guess it doesn't occur to them that even they or their children could one day fall on hard times and then qualify for being denied healthcare and allowed to die. It's all about putting money first and everything else second.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Shyron, thank you for your high praise. I'm glad you found this article useful and I hope you never need the information included. Thank you for the votes and shares. Hope all is well with you and John. Blessings and hugs for you both . . .


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Drbj, thank you for reading and commenting on this issue. No doubt those substances you mentioned do not mutate while being studied, and that sped things up. ;)


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Larry Rankin, thank you for coming by! You know what you suggested about air bags, that engineers were so focused on developing them that they may have missed more economical possibilities that would work just as well is true of antibiotics. They were so focused on developing antibiotics that they believed were the cure-all that they dropped everything on their experiments with phages. Now they have to try to pick up where they left off 75 years ago because antibiotics have turned out not to be even close to a magic pill.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 18 months ago from sunny Florida

Au Fait

Your opening statement about antibiotics not working is spot on. When my eldest grandson was newly born, he was sick all of the time (it took till age four to diagnose his cancer). So they gave him antibiotic on top of antibiotic until of course nothing worked. It took our insistence that they find another way and wise doctors to stop what they were doing. So there are a few drugs now that he can take.

This article is such an important one for each of us to be aware of.

My Momma had MRSA at the very end of her life and I had to dress carefully to enter the room and had to be extra cautious with care as I exited.

Voted up++++

Angels are on the way to you this morning ps


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Billybuc, thank you for taking time to read and comment on this article, and for your high praise. I'm sorry to hear your friends died, especially from such minor injuries. I'm hoping that spreading the word about how people can get help for MRSA will save lives.


LongTimeMother profile image

LongTimeMother 18 months ago from Australia

Michael Moore's 'Sicko' documentary aired on Australian tv last night. As I watched Americans receiving free treatment in a Cuban hospital for unresolved problems - and one American buying medication for 5cents (that costs $120 in the US) - I was reminded of how poor your health care system is. I don't understand why the FDA hasn't been dismantled and restructured.

I use colloidal silver and/or aloe vera on scraped knees, paper cuts and sore throats. Effective and affordable remedies.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 18 months ago

I had to come back and read this again. It is so interesting.

I hope you survived last night's storm.

Voted this up again UAI and shared.

Blessings and Hugs


TIMETRAVELER2 profile image

TIMETRAVELER2 18 months ago

A fascinating read. Bookmarking it "just in case"! I had a friend who died due to a scrape on his foot that became infected, and know another person who lost part of his leg for the same reason. Good to know there are ways of dealing with these issues. Thank you so much. voted up!


torrilynn profile image

torrilynn 18 months ago

I agree that a cut could cause you to lose your life especially a cut that occurs from rusty metal and that is not taken care of immediately. thanks for the hub. Best of wishes.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Ericdierker, thank you for reading and commenting on this article. I think the FDA is doing good for the most part, but every now and then we may run into something that doesn't fit the usual criteria, like bacteriophages that mutate before studies can be completed/finished. I think there should be a separate set of requirements for them since changing that characteristic about them nullifies most of their advantages.


Writer Fox profile image

Writer Fox 18 months ago from the wadi near the little river

This is a fascinating topic. It seems that many people seek treatment outside of the U.S., if they can afford it. In a life-or-death situation, I think all treatments should be made available in the U.S., whether they are FDA approved or not. Otherwise, the best treatments are only available to the rich.

Thanks for your excellent presentation of this topic.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 18 months ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

Great information and food for thought. It is scary to think about antibiotics losing their effectiveness from overuse. I try to do without them when I can.


Paul Kuehn profile image

Paul Kuehn 18 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand

Au fait, I applaud you for publishing another awesome hub which is both interesting and extremely useful. Thankfully I didn't need bacteriophages are my kidney operation last month. I was on antibiotics for five days in the hospital after the operation. They were delivered by IV and for five days by taking pills after I left the hospital. I certainly learned a lot about bacteriophages in this hub. Voted up and sharing with HP followers and also on Facebook.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Bobby, thank you for taking time to come by and ready my article and leave a lovely comment too! Appreciate your verifying that phages are not new and did indeed used to be readily available. Seems like antibiotics have created at least as many problems as they initially solved what with superbugs now lurking around

Glad you are feeling well. Take care xx


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 18 months ago from Houston, Texas

This is certainly an interesting article about a problem that is becoming more widespread in the U.S. and undoubtedly elsewhere as well. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics is one cause. Antibiotics cannot always be relied upon to help save people's lives as in the past. It is good to know that this therapy which has been around much longer than the advent of antibiotics is still working, and working well. Will definitely be sharing this far and wide!


poetryman6969 profile image

poetryman6969 18 months ago

I remember being told that at one time people were at risk if they cut their tongues whilst licking envelopes.

I wonder one day if we will teach and train our viruses to sit up, beg and make us immortal. I realize that not everyone wants to live forever but for those few who do I wonder if they would accept a virus or nanobot that complete rewrites their system. If you are made different by your immortality treatment then what is really being made immortal? Perhaps the viruses?

In the meantime, if the bacteriophages are safe and effective then I hope they will find wider usage. You always have to wonder if there are corporate payoffs every time you hear that there might be something useful but there is some mysterious reason why the government won't give it the go ahead.


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 18 months ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Au fait. I appreciate yet another important & fact-filled educational hub shared by you. What you explain here is in fact a real threat to us today.

When MRSA and C-Def entered the scene, we had to take serious note that this dilemma had become an issue of concern.

I'm afraid I have less faith in the FDA than ever. It is clear there are questionable & inexplicable actions & procedures with this arm of our over-sized Government. We are advised of their lengthy & complex testing & manufacturing for newer drugs which have been helpful (even life-saving) in other medically-advanced Countries, yet the obstacles abound.

At the same time, we must accept the discoveries of many of the drugs we now use which fail at their purpose. Further, we watch & listen (and suffer) as one drug after another is pulled from the market, creates a multitude of medical errors with resulting law suits in the billions.

It is no wonder the average informed individual is losing faith and hope in yet another area of our lives.

Our best defense is education, awareness and personal responisbilty.

Thank you au fait. As always I fully appreciate your work. UP+++


colorfulone profile image

colorfulone 18 months ago from Minnesota

This is an eye opener for me to read and a very important message. It is alarming that some people cannot get the proper treatment to save their lives, but some can. Alarming, but for some reason it does not surprise me. When things are run like that, there is something very wrong with the people in power and authority.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 18 months ago

Au fait, this is so interesting and useful, especially if someone gets a bacterial infection and does not know it. The doctors do not always do everything possible to help, I think first they look at what insurance the patient has and how much money they are worth.

A thumb up, UAI and shared on HP and FB

I hope all is well with you, blessings and hugs.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 18 months ago from North Texas Author

Mary615, thank you for reading and commenting on this article. You did read it correctly, you can get bacteriophages shipped to you from the Republic of Georgia. There is also a doctor in Lubbock, TX that might be of help and I put his name in this article. Or you could travel to Georgia . . . there are several options if you can afford them.


drbj profile image

drbj 18 months ago from south Florida

Those bacteriophages in the U.S. much like Rodney Dangerfield, just 'don't get no respect.' Our FDA is having difficulty approving their use but no difficulty whatsoever in okaying GMO and other noxious substances in our foodstuffs.

Thanks for this heads-up, Au fait.


Larry Rankin profile image

Larry Rankin 18 months ago from Oklahoma

So terrifying, these invisible creatures that can take our lives away.

Great article.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 18 months ago from Olympia, WA

An interesting read as always about a very serious problem here in the U.S. You did your research well. I've known two people who died recently because antibiotics could not help them with rather minor problems.


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 18 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

This is a great article on a subject we should all be concerned with. I know it is frustrating how long it takes for US approval but it sure is good to know the treatment is out there. Thank you.


diogenes profile image

diogenes 18 months ago from UK and Mexico

Another GREAT article, Misty. Informative and useful. Seems the money crunchers are now controlling the availability of phage treatment in the US. Here, the NHS won't pay for practically any expensive treatment; I don't know what they are doing re. phages. Incredible: Before penicillin we had phage treatment easily and cheaply available. Who knew!?

Boy, that "phage" looks like what we imagine a spaceman to be!

Regards Bob x


mary615 profile image

mary615 19 months ago from Florida

Wow! You packed a lot of information in this Hub. I was totally unaware that one could get the therapy they need to treat their resistant infection could possibly get the treatment they need shipped from Georgia (I hope I read that correctly). I know what a problem resistant staph is in our hospitals.

Voted this Hub UP, etc.

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