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Do you know the difference between vaccination and immunization?

  1. sannyasinman profile image61
    sannyasinmanposted 4 years ago

    BigPharma and its bought and paid for medical profession would have us believe that they are one and the same, but they are not.
    Do you know the difference?

    1. paradigmsearch profile image85
      paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      An excellent question and OP. You made me look it up. big_smile

      I found the answer enlightening.

  2. WriteAngled profile image93
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    Vaccination means the administration of a vaccine.

    Immunisation means the stimulation of a specifit immune response and the development of immunological memory to a defined antigen or pathogen.

    Vaccination with an effective vaccine will result in immunisation, vaccination with an ineffective vaccine, or the presence of any other conditions impairing the immune system of the person vaccinated, will not result in successful immunisation.

    Your point is.... ?

    1. sannyasinman profile image61
      sannyasinmanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Immunization is not the same as vaccination.

      This is explained in great detail by Dr Tim O’Shea in his book ‘Vaccination Is Not Immunization’ (5) He states and this is very important:

      Vaccination is merely the artificial triggering of temporary responses to manmade pathogens. Immunity? That’s a different topic altogether.

      Dr O’Shea goes on to quote Australian scientist Dr Viera Sheibner, PhD who says:
      There is only one immunity, natural immunity, which is achieved by going through the infectious diseases of childhood.

      Vaccination does not confer immunity. This is why many people catch a disease EVEN AFTER VACCINATION, and also why "booster" shots are often needed every few years.   

      I hope this explains the difference

      1. Nouveau Skeptic profile image73
        Nouveau Skepticposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        It might be more helpful to just tell use what you want to tell us rather than asking for answers and then saying you had a particular agenda in mind.

        Vaccinations can cause immunity.  The fact that it may be for a specific period of time does not change the fact that is is immunity.

        Personally I am happy to depend on a rabies vaccine and *not* my non-existent natural immunity to rabies when I go to treat a potential infected animal.

      2. WriteAngled profile image93
        WriteAngledposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I have a PhD in immunology and I do not agree with Dr Viera Sheibner PhD, who received her doctorate in micropaleontology not in immunology.

        1. paradigmsearch profile image85
          paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          So that was you I saw driving out of Langley yesterday...

          1. WriteAngled profile image93
            WriteAngledposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Well there are 17 Langleys in the UK smile

            1. paradigmsearch profile image85
              paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I hope they have a more benign reputation than the one we got here. lol

  3. profile image0
    Kathryn LJposted 4 years ago

    well I think one makes you go Owww and you may have to have more than one and the other makes you go Owww, Owww, Owww but you only have to have it the once.  As you can see, I do not have a doctorate in anything related to this question.

 
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