jump to last post 1-13 of 13 discussions (36 posts)

I know very few mental health "workers" who practice religion

  1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
    schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago

    some say they are spiritual. But I haven't heard any say they go to Mass, or church or anything.

    I'm tired of telling them about my beliefs, they look at me like I'm weird.
    It's like "giving pearls to swine" in the bible. they don't understand or appreciate and how dare they judge roll

    It pisses me off. I know there are many Christian therapists, etc but I don't know where to find them and if they take mass health or whatever. At least the therapist I have now is a mature male in his 50's or early 60's? not sure the age.

    I can't stand immature 22 yrs old social workers who are supposed to be helpful but really know nothing.

    And I wonder why people get into the mental health field anyways when so many end up dating clients???

    Just venting.

    oh btw,
    it's so ridiculous because religion is such a good coping skill. I think they're stupid, I'm sick of them, (some) and I just want to go back to work. lol

    1. Deborah Brooks profile image40
      Deborah Brooksposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      these social workers should not be dating their clients.. I am so sorry people are putting you down for your belief. I have experienced this too. Jesus says if you follow Him people will treat you badly.. He was treated very badly. My church helps me with these problems the Lord is good sent me to a good church.. we pray for each other.
      I have a prayer request page on Facebook if you want to join.. I am Deborah Brooks Langford
      <link snipped - no promotional links>
      Blessings to you

      1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
        schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        that's great about the prayer request page. smile

    2. krillco profile image94
      krillcoposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      You might try looking for a 'Pastoral Counselor'; we generally have clinical training that qualifies us for licensing. Though not overtly 'religious', we are spiritual and take spirituality into account in treatment. Bill Krill, Gentling.org

    3. recommend1 profile image71
      recommend1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      It has to be said that many symptoms of mental illness are the same as those of religious extremism.  I am from the UK and the normal everyday christian who lives their lives by their creed has all the appearances of 'normality' as far as I can tell.  Friends and colleagues who 'got' religion and started proclaiming at every occasion, especially those ultra-slimey born-again braindead, all exhibit classic signs of mental illness.

      The mental health professionals that I ever met were pretty worn down by dealing with mostly hard to beat mental illnesses, generally they tended to be uncaring and the few physiciatrists that I met were patently bonkers or horrible manipulative creatures, except one guy who committed suicide after fifteen yers in his profession and who was a nice enough normally hard working kinda guy when he frequented my pub.

      The high incidence of youngsters in this field is a pointer to the problems in doing the work I would say, the youngsters I met in Uni about 12 years ago studying any of the mental or social courses were the most unbalanced group in the place.

    4. raciniwa profile image79
      raciniwaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      it is not clear what religion are you referring to...what mass do you mean because there are religions that don't require a person to hear mass...mass was a later invention...because during the time of Jesus there was no mass yet they would visit synagogue to pray and study their sacred book...

  2. teacherjoe52 profile image58
    teacherjoe52posted 4 years ago

    Hi schoolgirlforreal.

    Most government workers have that chip on their shoulders,

    Why not go to Focus on the Family web site and talk with a coucillor for free. Maybe they can suggest a good Christian therapist in your area.

    God bless you.

  3. sharkfacts profile image90
    sharkfactsposted 4 years ago

    Religious beliefs or otherwise is a personal choice. If it helps you, well that's great:)

    I think it is unfair to expect others to join your personal belief.

    And if your mental health care workers are having relations with clients, well, that is their private business, don't you think?

    You don't have to agree with it.
    They don't have to agree with your religious beliefs.

  4. Jewels profile image80
    Jewelsposted 4 years ago

    A good therapist does not allow their beliefs to cloud their profession.  If you want counselling by a religious person, go to your priest or minister.

    If you want someone to agree with you, go and have a debate.  But if you are confused, anxious, fearful and need to be able to cope with your life, regardless of what job you do, what church you pray in, go to a psychologist or counselor who can be objective and impartial.

    The relationship with your counselor is very important and you won't have that relationship if the counselor is biased, and you won't have a good relationship with your counselor if you are wanting them to believe what you do. It's most likely your beliefs, your perspective on life is creating your problems.   Having a counselor believe what you do is not in your best interests, and is just not ethical.

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this


      thanks for your input all, much appreciated!

  5. Nouveau Skeptic profile image76
    Nouveau Skepticposted 4 years ago

    Very few people in general attend services.  I doubt mental health workers are unique in that.

  6. 0
    Larry Wallposted 4 years ago

    How many mental health workers do you know? I will agree many do not--many people in a lot of professions do not.

    I know about six mental health workers in various ways and they all practice some type of Christian religion.

    Of the six, are two my family has seen professionally, and four that are friends. We know a couple who are believers but do not attend church services on a regular basis.

  7. Nouveau Skeptic profile image76
    Nouveau Skepticposted 4 years ago

    I used to work in the area myself and cannot think of a single one of my colleagues that I knew went to church or temple regularly (rather than just for Easter etc).

    To say it is an issue with that workforce specifically you would need actual data with a control group.

    Of course the nature of the work itself made keeping a regular schedule of any kind rather difficult.

  8. mega1 profile image80
    mega1posted 4 years ago

    yes, they are all right - you can easily find others who are like you who also know psychology and can help you more than people who don't agree with your religion.  However, and I mean this with love - what, exactly, did these therapists say and do about your religion that so pissed you off?  Because if you were giving them a "lecture" on how much Jesus loves them - like some people do, you have to admit - its their belief that they should tell everyone they meet about their God.  Now that just doesn't sit well with many people, because it sounds to some self righteous and puritanical and maybe a psych counselor's office isn't the best place to talk about religion - at least not until they know you a bit better.  And I know you will say that your religion is part of who you are, and that is very true and they should be welcoming and receptive to all of you.  However, when I meet people who try to tell me that they are going to give me religion, I get very nervous and unhappy and I try not to be rude, but sometimes its just so inappropriate and they won't stop trying to convert me, and I hate that.  Because I already have all the religion I want, thank you. and if people want to share mutual religion experiences in an informal setting where there is no other agenda, then YES!  but don't have the attitude that we are swine because we don't want to believe and accept your pearls of religion - that it is not conducive to getting help.  OK.  so I just vented about my side of it!!  struck a cord there, you did!

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      that's ok,
      I didn't do any of that. It's just that,
      I can tell they are not very spiritual, the groups that is, not individual therapist, i'm talking about group therapy. groups about self esteeem, etc.
      The staff, or whatever they are, are just not really spiritual. well I asked and a few said they are spiritual. The thing is, is that it's very importatnt for people there , clients, to talk about it, so they asked me to lead a spirtiual group. but I see so much anger and suicaidal ness in the people and they may feel better if they had faith although I haven't been using mine in a couple days. It's not easy to turn to it all the time.
      so, rambling on, i know many clients hunger for it, so i did the group a few times, it went pretty well , some came
      I just don't understand why more clients aren't religuous. cause it kept me from huring my self.

      1. Jewels profile image80
        Jewelsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        You may find that it's not religion that people are wanting, it's caring and empathy.  Those last two traits are spiritual in essence.  You don't have to follow a religious doctrine to care about people.  It is very very important that counselors and psychotherapists remain objective and focused on your wellbeing and state of mental health.  That's what they study to do, that's what they are paid for. 

        You know, being spiritual - in essence is about caring, among other traits.  So as long as you care, you don't have to read one piece of scripture and you don't have to mention the word God or Jesus to anyone.  You just be caring and non-judgmental and your experiences will be wonderful.

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
          schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          smile smile

      2. mega1 profile image80
        mega1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        just thinking about this - and came up with :  we all have spirits.  we all have what I call spiritual health or dis-ease, and that depends very much on how we see others, the world, ourselves in it and our place in it.  The spirit we carry with us - maybe its what people call our "soul" - can make us ill, psychologically, mentally - physically too.  This happens when we ignore our spirit and don't feed it on good experiences, loving friends, appreciation of the natural world etc. Many people don't realize this and think that they have become ill because of chemicals in the environment or not enough chemicals in the brain or not the right ones or something that can be cured with pharmaceuticals.  Well - that is just not how it is - first we suffer on a spiritual level, then we may make some bad choices and we become unhealthy and then the chemical unbalances start that make us obviously distressed.  OK, maybe this is not true for everyone - some people may be born with chemical unbalances or compromised body systems - but for most of us, if we pay close attention to ourselves and look deeply inside we will find our spirit is lonely or confused or not confident when we are feeling ill.  Do you see what I'm getting at?  Religion helps many console their spirits, sometimes it heals too, but not always.  People don't need to have an organized religion to have healthy spirits, however.    Religion just doesn't work for me because since I was a child I have seen a lot of hypocrisy in religious folk.  I like to use some Buddhist and Yoga, and some Native American practices to center, meditate, breath and open myself up to beauty all around me.  But I don't think of this as religious dogma -  more like tools to keep my spirit happy and active and healthy.  Certainly, it makes no sense to try to get others to see the way I do, because what I do and think may not be right for them.

        I say all this, because it is very hard to meet and talk to people for a few hours and decide whether they are "spiritual" or not, especially when those people are distressed for whatever reasons. Everyone is spiritual, some don't display it but they actually pay a lot of attention to spiritual matters.  Others may be suffering because they have been ignoring their spiritual centers.  But whatever, we can only change and work on ourselves.  IMO  it is never a good idea to decide that other people are not living the right way because they don't believe just like we do.  It helps me always to know that the commonality we all share of having a vulnerable and valuable spirit is always going to be there and when someone seems not to be hearing me - I try to remember that their spirit will hear as long as I speak and act out of truth and love.  I know it has been that way for me, and I didn't think I was hearing but my spirit did and so I was helped by other peoples honest concern and compassion.

  9. Len Cannon profile image88
    Len Cannonposted 4 years ago

    nice scare quotes around workers.

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      lol lol

  10. Mighty Mom profile image92
    Mighty Momposted 4 years ago

    I understand how it feels to be disapppointed in a health professional because they don't share your spiritual views. I've had a similar situation with my acupunturist. He said something that made me lose all faith in him.
    Now that I've calmed down and put some distance to it, I realize I judge him too harshly. His views on my spiritual program are irrelevant. The question is, is he a good acupuncturist?

    Here's a way of looking at it that may or may not help.
    1. Look for the similarities rather than the differences ith others in the group. No one there is going to have your exact set of circumstances. Be open to the possibility that wisdom can come in unexpected forms.
    2. Are you perhaps looking for reasons to discount what your therapist is saying? I know I've been guilty of that.
    3. Is your criticism fair? You would not expect your Christian minister to be able to cross-treat you as a mental health professional, would you? Why do you expect your mental health counselor to be able to cross-treat your spirituality?
    Mental health and spiritual health are related and intertwined.
    But they are NOT the same.
    If they were, wouldn't you be getting everything you need from your church and not need therapy?

    Not saying this to be harsh on you. Saying it cuz I've been guilty of the same flawed thinking!

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      smile more good stuff MM.

  11. JBrumett profile image61
    JBrumettposted 4 years ago

    I don't know many mental health professionals who practice mental health.  I'm more worried about that.  =-P

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this


      good one!

  12. calculus-geometry profile image85
    calculus-geometryposted 4 years ago

    A mental health worker who let their religious views dictate the way they did their job, or who talked about religion a lot with their patients would probably get into trouble with supervisors.  Who knows if maybe they got in trouble for it in the past. Of course they should be guided by good ethical and moral principles, but that is separate from religion.  You don't need to believe in God in order to be ethical.

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this


      1. 0
        Larry Wallposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        A mental health professional can certainly be a religious person. If appropriate, depending on the case and circumstances, he or she should understand the basis of the patient's value and belief system if there is a belief system, i.e. religion for the patient.

        That may trigger a series of questions, again depending on the circumstances, as to how the patient got to the point where he/she is today--overly zealous parents, no religious training, inappropriate actions by parents, siblings, seen as an outsider by friends because he did not attend church or was of a "different" faith.

        Even though the religious background of the therapist may be totally idea, it will provide a base for understanding if the lack of a belief system, or the over dependence on a belief system, is part of the reason the person is seeking treatment.

        Every case would be different and sometimes, bringing up the subject may not be appropriate and sometimes the patient might bring it up and if the patient does belong to an organized church, may feel uncomfortable, if the therapist claims to have no religious beliefs or just refuses to answer, thus creating a barrier and preventing a rapport between patient and therapist from developing.

        1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
          schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I think it's easier to relate to a therapist who has a spiritual backgroud and is specific like christian for example- then you're on the same page (and you can talk about experiences, beliefs, practices,) to get somewhere to a better understanding......

          1. 0
            Larry Wallposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I agree and you can find Christian therapists through churches and from other therapists. Even if the therapist is not active in a particular religion, would not prevent her from understanding how your beliefs are impacting your life and your decisions.

            1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
              schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              true. I don't have problems. It's just that I see that "funny look' in some of their eyes ......Lol like they think religion is crazy, and of course I see that all the time in the r&b forums.
              Each to his own.
              religion is NOT a mental disease- spirituality is not- only if it clouds your mind so much that it becomes a problem

              smile smile

              1. Jeff Berndt profile image92
                Jeff Berndtposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I don't have problems. It's just that I see that "funny look' in some of their eyes.
                Well, could it be that you're seeing what you expect to see?

                I mean, there's a pervasive belief throughout America that colleges are propaganda machines for secular humanism, and anyone with an advanced degree is probably an atheist who looks down on religious folks.

                Might you be seeing 'that "funny look"' because you've bought into the idea that people with advanced degrees all look down on religion?

                Of course, there's a similar idea running around that anyone who is religious is automatically someone who hates and fears higher education, science, rationality, and so on. So you might be a victim of that.

                Maybe the next time you notice that funny look in a therapists eyes, stop for a moment and tell him that you get the feeling that he's uncomfortable. Ask him if you've said something that gives him cause for concern.

                If he's a decent therapist, he'll be open to having that dialogue, because it's part of his job to make you feel at ease in his presence. If he's doing something to make you feel uncomfortable, and can't bring himself to stop, he needs to recommend a different therapist--one that he thinks you'll be comfortable with.

                1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
                  schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Hey Jeff,

                  Nice try! smile
                  No, I'm def not one of those who hates and fear higher education etc or I wouldn't be talking to people who are rational on a daily basis, or reading hubs on it.

                  I have told my therapist that and he says I'm fine to believe what I want. Which is cool and fine but I know in my own mind he may not relate and that's okay. It's prob just my own insecurity of needing someone to agree with me on every level , but as you said, yes I think many with degrees do look down on religion and it's taught in college.
                  Lol. When i took English class in college, the professor tried to state that his opinion was fact.
                  Even in highschool the teacher said we came from apes.
                  Both times I stood up to them.
                  I choose to believe we were created by God. I really don't think there is 100% proof of the ape thing.
                  As for what the college professor tried to say was fact- he said his belief in abortion was The thing. I said No, It's not The thing. I said, I believe you are wrong, and you have no right telling me that I should or shouldn't be prochoice/prolife.
                  That is a personal descision- be it right or wrong.
                  And don't tell Me to believe what You do, Just because you Say it.

                  and that's just me.
                  I tell it like it is, no mincing words.

                  If I used poor language, I would have told him to screw himself or called him a c***suck**.
                  and I am right! don't debate me! lol


                  1. Jeff Berndt profile image92
                    Jeff Berndtposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    No, I'm def not one of those who hates and fear higher education etc
                    Really? But,
                    yes I think many with degrees do look down on religion and it's taught in college.

                    Maybe you don't "hate" or "fear" education or educated people, but you certainly are not without your own biases toward them.

                    You might just be seeing what you expect to see.

  13. donotfear profile image89
    donotfearposted 4 years ago

    Allow me to chime in here. I'm a Christian of the pentecostal/full gospel denomination.   As a bachelor level Mental Health Professional, I must say that we are instructed NOT to initiate conversation about God or spiritual issues unless it's brought up by the client.  But, while working as a Crisis Assessor, I found plenty of opportunity to implement my spiritual beliefs into the intervention.  It was usually a high drama situation with suicide attempts, breakdowns, psychosis, etc.  Occasionally, I'd get a client who would reach out with a request for spiritual help.  In that case, I could reassure the client and /or family,  backing it up with a referral to clergy.  There were times when I prayed with the family and helped motivate the client not to give up on life, but only when the client or family initiated the introduction. 

    Staying professional, but allowing love and compassion to flow, I can't tell you how many clients and family verbally expressed their gratitude for my help.  It's a shaky area, but waiting for the right time & place always worked.  In case management, where I see the client over and over again, belief in God is often talked about.   I urge client's to continue fellowship with their church family. 

    I know a psychiatrist who went to my church. He participated in praise & worship like everyone else.   So there are many believers who are mental health professionals.

    1. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      That's really good to hear, donotfear, I think your approach is very appropriate and I admire you.
      Thanks for your input!