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What exactly does one do when gong blind?

  1. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago

    Yep, going blind in right eye is real. So much so, I'm posting about it.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      And I just saw the title misspelling. Fuck it. close this thread.

      1. Marisa Wright profile image93
        Marisa Wrightposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Do you know the reason?  There is so much information out there - overwhelming, I know, but don't just sit back, get out there, get informed and fight back! Knowing the problem is the first step and getting the right help is the second.

        1. paradigmsearch profile image89
          paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Agreed!!!

    2. moonlake profile image86
      moonlakeposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I'm also going blind. My left eye is the worst. I have to look at my computer with only my right eye. When I try to keep my left eye open it just closes.  I wish I knew what would help but I don’t . I have no idea who to talk to or what help is out there. I can type with my eyes closed so that is not a problem but if you can’t see the words your typing what good does that do.  I often make mistakes I just don’t see. My right eye is not great.
      I’m so sorry to hear you are having problems with your eyes I know how you feel. Is there anything that can be done?

      1. paradigmsearch profile image89
        paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Welcome to America.

    3. Rochelle Frank profile image89
      Rochelle Frankposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      One thing to check out is Dragon Dictate software-- it is pretty good and improving all the time.

      Also there are programs that allow you to see large format on screens or tv monitors.  Use all of the technology available, while seeking whatever medical solutions you can find.
      Best of luck...

      1. paradigmsearch profile image89
        paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Medical solutions? HA!

        However, I'm a big fan of ctrl+ big_smile

  2. TDowling profile image91
    TDowlingposted 3 years ago

    That's tough. I guess after some period of adjustment (forever) you need to learn NOW how to touch type and how to read braille. You'll need help if you go completely blind: a guide dog or you'll need to learn how to use a walking stick. Don't know how much help I've been. I don't have any first hand experience.

    I would suggest contacting the American Foundation for the Blind at: http://www.afb.org or the National Federation of the Blind at: https://nfb.org/ I bet your local library has books on tape.

    Good luck and God bless.

  3. habee profile image89
    habeeposted 3 years ago

    Para, that's terrible! How's the sight in your other eye?

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Zero problems.

      Edit: other than glasses of course.

  4. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago

    I shall ...

  5. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago

    I should make a

  6. SoundNFury profile image84
    SoundNFuryposted 3 years ago

    Really sorry to hear about this.  But I think one positive thing you can do is write about it.  Get it out there.  What you are experiencing.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      That's a thought. I don't see any traffic potential, but it would be good therapy.

      1. brakel2 profile image85
        brakel2posted 3 years ago in reply to this

        I hope you both can find or have found good medical doctors. Ask lots of questions. I agree with Moonlake that you must check good sites on the computer. I need to know everything, and doctors would have to spend hours with me. So find out all you can on your own, calling blind services, and senior services, anybody you know with similar problems, and don't give up. If I was there, I would help with the calling. Wish there was something I could do. Anyway, hugs to both of you.

  7. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 3 years ago

    paradigmsearch and moonlake - I am sorry for your eye problems and am thinking about you both, hoping you find some way of improvement.

    Patty

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/7947476_f248.jpg
      big_smile

      Seriously, all is well. If there is one thing I've learned in life, it is that I'm not alone or unique. In fact, it is the opposite. Misery and problems are the norm, not the exception. If anyone disputes that, turn on the freaking news.

      I read a quote recently. Cracks me up.

      "Suck it up, buttercup"

  8. wilderness profile image95
    wildernessposted 3 years ago

    Para, Moonlake, if you haven't yet, get to a top ophthalmologist soon.  There are a lot of things that can cause blindness that are also correctable. 

    At this time last year I couldn't read a book even with glasses.  A simple cataract surgery and a little time has put me back to 20/20.  My mother has had cataract surgery, lens implants 40 years later and now cornea transplants.  One of her eyes is truly gone, with macular degeneration beyond any help, but she still sees with the other.  At one point she used a white cane to tap the ground ahead, painted the knobs on her stove with big dots so she could see if it was off and painted the edge of the porch steps with a bright white line so she could see the edge of the step but is now able to function even at after all the eye work at 90 years old.

    Please, do NOT give up your sight without a fight.  I almost did, after finding I had cataracts I couldn't afford to fix (I thought) and am so glad I didn't quit trying.  There really is a way to help so many eye problems.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you, wilderness. You are right. Because of yours and others' posts, I will not go down without a fight. The people here at HubPages are truly amazing. And I'm not kidding. How can there be so many beautiful people in a single place? It's just plain not normal!!! lol

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Attaboy PDS.  I've watched and given moral support as my elderly mother has fought for years to maintain some sight.  It's not been easy for her, especially at her age, but she's fighting and at a minimum it's given her far more quality of life for at least a decade now.  Even if, God forbid, she goes completely blind tomorrow, it will have been worth the effort to see her grandkids when they visit.

        It's worth whatever it takes.

  9. agilitymach profile image99
    agilitymachposted 3 years ago

    I, too, have serious vision issues.  I had cataracts removed a few years ago, but developed Cystoid Macular Edema in both eyes.  It's much worse in my right eye.  I also then developed glaucoma in both eyes. I've had about six eye surgeries now for the glaucoma and the original cataracts.

    My right eye is legally blind.  I can't read the big E on the eye chart with it.  Fortunately, my left eye is still OK.  I see deterioration in it, but at my last appointment, it was seeing 20/30.  This keeps me driving. smile

    There are tons of helps out there for those with low vision.  These include computer programs that can allow you to view your text larger; devices that "blow up" printed text and puts it on a screen so you can read it; special pens that have really dark, bold ink; social programs that help you learn how to adjust to low vision; and even the possibility of a "low vision" service dog.  As a dog trainer, I'm already planning on training my next dog as a "low vision" service dog, which is different from a "seeing eye dog."

    The biggest issue for me if my left eye ever gets vision worse than 50/20 is the inability to drive.  Driving in our society (and in my specific community) means independence.  With all of the low vision aids, the rest of my life should work just fine, but loosing my ability to drive is what bothers me.

    If you haven't, you must get in touch with top notch eye specialists.  I have three eye doctors now, each with their own specialty.  Don't be afraid of getting help because it is true that there is a LOT that can be done to preserve sight these days. 

    Don't let it overwhelm you.  Loss of vision in one eye is a drag, but so many people function with basically only one eye - like myself.  Hang in there!!!

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      It is posts like yours that let me know that I am not alone. Just knowing that I am not alone helps so much. I will fight the good fight and live life to the fullest.

      1. agilitymach profile image99
        agilitymachposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        There ya go!! smile  I have friends who compete Nationally in a popular sport who only have vision in one eye.  They do awesome, and you'd never know unless you knew their circumstance.  I don't miss the loss of vision in my right eye much at all.  Your brain compensates for the loss.  I had one friend who is totally blind in one eye tell me the only time she misses her vision is when she's shaving the opposite arm pit.  Then, she can't see it. smile

        1. paradigmsearch profile image89
          paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          My profile score has dropped from 97 to 91 since I started this thread. And I think some of my replies here have disappeared, but I could be wrong. The adventure continues...

          1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
            Patty Inglish, MSposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Maybe it's that cartoon post card you posted. (LOL) smile

            1. paradigmsearch profile image89
              paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              The secret of life? It is one's first thought when one wakes up in the morning. How to control that? Watch a favorite video just before going to sleep the night before.

              1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image89
                Patty Inglish, MSposted 3 years ago in reply to this

                Good advice. The favorite video in the nighttime works well.

          2. agilitymach profile image99
            agilitymachposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            That's interesting because mine has gone up. wink

  10. Will Apse profile image90
    Will Apseposted 3 years ago

    I lost the sight in one eye over a period of a few days. Turned out I had something called uveitis which is easy to control, if not cure. Now I use very inexpensive steroid eye drops whenever I feel an attack coming on. The right diagnosis is everything. After that it may cost almost nothing to fix.

    Best of luck.

  11. StitchTheDamned profile image90
    StitchTheDamnedposted 3 years ago

    You can look into the speech recognition software, so that you can continue writing.

  12. moonlake profile image86
    moonlakeposted 3 years ago

    I have Mactel. There is nothing they can do. I also have cataracts
    and they don't want to remove them because they think it may cause the Mactel to be worse. They will remove them because I will insist and that time is coming soon. I’m willing to take the chance on better eyesight. The Mactel will never go away so I have to live with that. I’m hoping it won’t get to the point where I can’t drive. I have been everywhere I can go for this disease. Same story from all the doctors. One doctor said to me " You won't go completely blind you just won't be able to read or drive a car."
    When I say I have no idea who to talk to or what help is out there, by that I mean in ways of making life easier in the house or on the computer. You would think when you go to the eye doctor they would explain things that would make life easier or give information on where to go for the right items to help. I guess I will have to do my own research on that. I quilt too so that is a problem for me I'm trying to get all the kids quilts made before my eyesight is so bad I can't see to do it.

    1. agilitymach profile image99
      agilitymachposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Every state is different as far as programs offered for those with low vision.  Locally, there is a program to help people with low vision learn about their options with the computer and reading.  Google the term "low vision aids," and you can start your researching.  Call your eye doctor and specifically ask about government or non-profit programs in your area that help those with low vision.  You will probably have to qualify, and if you are driving, you see too well for these programs yet.  But they are out there. smile

    2. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I shall spare this thread as to what I think about the bastard medical entities in this country.

  13. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 3 years ago

    What really pisses me off is that if I lived in Europe, I could be cured. Yep, macular degeneration can be cured these days. If you have the money. Or live in Europe. I am not a happy camper. Haven't read this thread yet. Will do so later.

  14. Reality Bytes profile image94
    Reality Bytesposted 3 years ago

    If you can get to Massachusetts you may find help.  I know Tufts Medical center in Boston does a lot of Pro Bono stuff. They are a teaching hospital and they helped my wife incredibly when she was diagnosed with cancer.

  15. Angela Blair profile image88
    Angela Blairposted 3 years ago

    As one who's been dealing with this for close to 10 years -- I find myself comparing age and extent of blindness. In other words when I first found my left eye was basically a zero without major surgery (which would possibly bring that eye's vision back to 30% -- but not probably) I began weighing the pros and cons. Surgery for the left eye wasn't in my plans -- too much and too little guarantee. Both eyes had cataracts so had the "good" right eye cataract removed eight years ago and only recently had the cataract removed from the "bad" eye -- and there was a bit of improvement but not much. At 75-years-old I'm counting on what's left of the good eye (the doc's now found spots on the macula) lasting as long as I do -- but that's up to the Good Lord. If I had one bit of advice to everyone who has not suffered eye problems it would be this: Treat your eyes as golden -- get them checked regularly by an eye doctor (not just an optometrist). Had I done this I wouldn't have lost most of the sight in my left eye so I have no one to blame but me. By the time I went to the eye doc and he found the hole in the macula of the left eye it was as big as it could get and although surgery was a possibility it would have been better/easier if found in its infancy. Your question has raised the thought of writing a Hub on this subject as I'm a pretty good example of too little/too late.

 
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