Correlation between levels of education and the rate of aging

  1. gmwilliams profile image82
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

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    According to a May 11, 2001 article in Medical News Today, people with lower educational levels tend to age faster than their more highly educated counterparts. Partly this is attributed to the fact that less educated people had shorter telomeres or "caps" at the end of their DNA, which is a sign of premature aging in cells. The article further elaborated that besides the educational level factor, there are other mitigating psychological, emotional, and socioeconomic factors which are determinants as to why people with lower educational levels tend to age faster than those who are more highly educated. Now, don't YOU wished you stayed in school longer? Let's discuss this at length.
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/224884.php
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13345620
    http://www.interestingtopics.net/educat … wer-id-565

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image82
      Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      IMO People who go to school and work toward advanced degrees are people of very robust natures. They probably developed these hearty natures in early childhood. They exhibit a strong joy of life which manifests as ambition, curiosity, interest/curiosity, determination, strength of will, did I mention joy of life?  I think early childhood conditions fostered the health of body and mind which they carried with them throughout their whole lives. Therefore the caps. Thanks for the interesting topic and links.

      1. gmwilliams profile image82
        gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Quite welcome indeed.  You have further elucidated some excellent points I might add. Always GREAT to hear from you, Kathryn!

 
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