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Does it embarrass you to suffer from a mental illness?

  1. figment profile image71
    figmentposted 6 years ago

    I'm 32, and I have suffered with mental illness all my life.  Sometimes with certain people I don't mind talking about my certain disorders, but other times, I feel ashamed and embarrassed.  I guess it depends on the people you are talking to and the mental illness you are disclosing to them.

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I think it does depend a lot on who the listener is. Some people are able to contribute correctly to any discussion of mental illness, others may need more education about it. smile

    2. Valerie F profile image60
      Valerie Fposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I think it depends on one's own attitude toward his or her condition as well as reactions he or she receives or believes he or she might receive from others.

      I had only a mild case of baby blues for several weeks after my son was born, and people have stooped low enough to use that as an excuse to write off any opinion of mine that was contrary to theirs as a byproduct of my "mental illness." So I can understand why some people who wish to be treated respectfully would be reticent about disclosing any mental health history.

    3. 0
      Deborah Sextonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Since a mental illness is a disease, there is no reason to be embarassed. It's like saying someone is embarassed because they have Multiple Sclerosis.

    4. 60
      jimmyianposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I agree wth them.It solely depends on the person with whome you are sharing.

    5. www.mamasiran.com profile image60
      www.mamasiran.composted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I won't be embarassed!

    6. nuveau profile image58
      nuveauposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Greetings. Well, I am 55 and have been diagnosed with MDD, Major Depressive Disorder. I have been taking Cipralex to regulate serotonin levels but in all honesty, haven't seen much change.

      My very caring and understanding doctor can only deal mostly with the physical...how can he heal deep feelings of despair, regret, and shame that I feel? He can't because that's not what he's trained to do. Enter plan "B"...meeting with 'the shrink'.

      I've learned a tad or two about this condition - it's an effort to simply brush your teeth or shower. I've gone days without showering simply because it's too much effort and ... doesn't matter, anyway. At 10:00 in the morning, I am ready to go back to bed.

      Sigh...my body and mind are sooooooo tired but,,,I remain positive...kinda. Not really, that's a joke. See what I mean? The fluctuation from hope to despair is exhausting.

      So..my POV. Gotta take a pill now, but...ehhhhhhh...maybe, maybe not.

      1. 0
        B.C. BOUTIQUEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        hi there..welcome, glad to have you hear and kow that you , too , are not ashamed or afraid of what people may think just because of an issue you can not help..


        smile

      2. 0
        wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Well said.  Exactly my experience...  It doesn't seem there's a panacea for my MDD, either.  I've been on many, some help a bit more than others.  For a long time Paxil worked well for me.  Went off of it and onto something else (Cymbalta) that was a nightmare.  Didn't work, made me feel TIRED all the time, which is the main MDD symptom I have.  Went off of it with a whole lot of hideous withdrawal brain ZAP symptoms.  Went back on Paxil, which I'm still one.  Not nearly as effective as it used to be, but staves off the LONG episodes I get.

      3. wyanjen profile image86
        wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I was the most skeptical person on the PLANET when I was forced to go see a shrink. I hated the idea and had no hope that it would help.

        But... it has helped me, more than any medication ever has. smile

      4. Daniel Carter profile image91
        Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        There are so many factors that come into play with long-term depression. It's sometimes considered more difficult to treat than bipolar, but it's such a completely individual thing. There are more and more studies and evidence that such disorders are in part a result of the brain not receiving all the nutrients it needs. It may be that digestion is not optimal, or that neurotransmitters are not working correctly. So many factors and possibilities. However, in some cases, where there has been brain trauma or some other damage to the digestion and brain, it becomes far more complicated. Often, however, extreme persistence in cleaning up digestion and assimilation can help reduce *some* of the effects, and therefore, making medications more effective for treatment.

        It's all complicated, and it's a frustrating process, but I can tell you from personal experience, it's worth it to keep working with it, tweaking things, and going forward. It's amazing what you learn about your own body and it's incredible resilience.

        Sending kindest and best to you as you continue on your journey to healing....

        1. Jaggedfrost profile image87
          Jaggedfrostposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          hmm Do you have bipolar? Granted MDD is no cake walk and when a bipolar swing heads that direction it is not fun and remembering that tomorrow will be a better day than to day isn't easy but bipolar has a long term cost that I consider as bad if not worse than just going down.  The over all comparison isn't precisely fair but the mind actually wants to quit after long time abuse due to severe bipolar symptoms which results in delusions and possible hallucinations.  Once these start, people effected with bipolar almost instinctual start to crave them as minor respites from the constant pull between two very violent inputs of emotional distress. If not treated and or the person isn't very aware and disciplined in their approach the mind will start to cling to these escapes and then the reasoning centers in the brain start to decay and TADA schizophrenia.

          *chuckle* ok I admit my response was a bit Freudian. In that I consider this side effect of bipolar disorder scarier than the alternative because it is a ghost that haunts me constantly and I have to be constantly on guard against believing anything that comes to my head that cant be identified as real.

          1. katiem2 profile image60
            katiem2posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Great information thanks for sharing I now have a greater understanding of BP.  Peace smile

            1. lxxy profile image61
              lxxyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Sounds like a severe case of bipolar.

              I've been labeled with bipolar, major depression, ADD/HD, etc. It's all greek--and BS to me. But I suppose it depends on your attitude and willingness to lead a good life and get back on the horse when circumstance throws you off.

              1. Fluffymetal profile image78
                Fluffymetalposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                You're labeled with the same shit as me with the exception of Borderline Personality Disorder - it REALLY sucks!

                1. lxxy profile image61
                  lxxyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I don't know, if people here about it and freak out I get to use the crazy eye.

                  http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BRMr2D3unLI/S9BfQBJ5GEI/AAAAAAAAAFM/2ErgACummgQ/s800/newkidcrazyeyes.jpg

                  But in all truth, I'm not much for labels. Sure, it can be hard to find stuff in piles and places, but my attentive memory really pulls through. wink

                2. Denise K Zimmerma profile image59
                  Denise K Zimmermaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  It is not right for others labeling you, finding people that really know you and stick with them.  Do some research on the subject you can find out more from a good friend by the name of David Oliver he writes news letters on the subject.

    7. mintinfo profile image82
      mintinfoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      As far as societal norms are concerned I don't think I suffer from any form of mental illness so maybe I am not qualified to answer your question but I would still like to add a comment. As lone as you are not obnoxious in your behavior I don't see why you cannot discuss your problems with others who are willing to offer sound advise.

      Being aware that you suffer from a mental illness means that you are able to rationalize your behavior. You know what is right and what is wrong and what is appropriate. Keep on discussing your issues. You will eventually find someone able and willing to assist you. Good luck

      1. lorlie6 profile image85
        lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        "...able to rationalize your behavior?"  Are you serious?  Wow-try a little insight, man, I'll bet you've a couple of screws loose somewhere.
        Good luck to you too.

        1. 0
          B.C. BOUTIQUEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          you tell him , lorile

          let him have it..there is no rationalization about it..its called functioning...

          and I am proud that you can, I have met many people who can not function and would never admit and honestly not be afraid to tell what you have told us tonight

        2. mintinfo profile image82
          mintinfoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I am sure Figment knew what I meant. If she didn't than I apologize. "insight?" come on! What I meant was that there are people who suffer from mental illnesses and do not recognize that they do. They go through life in a self destructive state while there might be help available. Figment recognizes that she needs help and if sharing and talking about it wasn't therapeutic then she wouldn't be here.

          I have seen Figment around the forum and I am aware that she suffers. She is also on my Followers list. My intent was not to disrespect her.

          1. figment profile image71
            figmentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I don't get offended easily.  no disrespect here.  : )

          2. lorlie6 profile image85
            lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Mintinfo-I believe I owe you an apology.  I do understand what you are saying now, and misinterpreted what you meant earlier.  You're right-there are many folks out there unaware of their behavior, casting about unknowingly on a self-destructive course.
            In the end, I'm sorry for the misunderstanding, and know you meant no disrespect.

            1. mintinfo profile image82
              mintinfoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Accepted and understood also. It is good to see the support system that you all have developed though even if I was a victim of it.

              1. Faybe Bay profile image83
                Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                All of you are right, my daughter's roomy/ ex-botfriend is always laying into her about her mental state, never admitting he also has problems. It is unfair to hold something over one's head that you have yourself and cannot see.

      2. Jaggedfrost profile image87
        Jaggedfrostposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Your response put a big smile on my face mostly because people who haven't been tied to people who suffer from mental illness or suffer themselves from conditions that warp reality so that explaining anything gets lost in translation have a tendency of being intellectually dishonest enough not to consider what would happen to their well balanced mind should some aspect of it get taken for a hayride that it can't return from.   The sad part is that it is people like you that people like me hate talking to, not because we don't understand how things look to you or even that we blame you for seeing things that way but because you are a voice in our head that becomes all the louder for listening to you that says, "We should be able to deal with our conditions on our own because they are all in our head anyway right?"

    8. 0
      Heather Voightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I wouldn't say I'm embarassed but I do get frustrated when I mention the d word (depression) and people suddenly decide not to speak to me. I believe in being open about my past struggles so it's upsetting when I'm treated like someone who has a contagious disease. People need to realize it's just like suffering from any other illness. I'm not going to pretend I never had a problem though. If people can't accept me for who I am, then who needs them?

      1. figment profile image71
        figmentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        you're accepted in this community, at least this forum

    9. 0
      Lecieposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      i have social phobias...that means people terrify me. really all i do is sit at home writing. when i go anywhere i have my mom drive me and stay the whole time. i even took her with me on my first date since i was 15. i'm not embarresed. i only talk to people who have already been made aware of my illness. talking on the computer is the greatest thing in the world. i can say what i mean and not be given the looks or here the put downs that terrify me the most. what does it matter if someone quits talking to you because of your illness? it just means they're not the nice and caring person you want for a friend in the first place. it's the ones who know about your illness and still talk to you. i don't think they're embarresed to have you for a friend. why should you be embarresed to be the friend they like? just be happy anyway you can.
      have fun and be creative
      lecie

      1. Fluffymetal profile image78
        Fluffymetalposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Nice to meet you Lecie

      2. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
        schoolgirlforrealposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Hi
        I sent you some fan mail, i should have wrote it here:
        Do you ever get depressed from haivng social phobia? I have social anxiety and if I don't get out I feel awful

    10. free4india profile image60
      free4indiaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      As per a psychiatrist, everybody is some way or other mentally ill.  Some are overly concerned about health, some about cars, some about cooking and so on.

    11. GarnetBird profile image84
      GarnetBirdposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I have had mental symptoms for over 20 years now, resulting from 7 years of incestuous abuse at the hands of my stepfather.  Your post was brave and candid; this is REAL, it is not caused by weakness or sloppy thinking. Think of it as managing symptoms; be good to yourself!
           Please visit my ebay store, BOOKHIVE and google Lake of Shame: An Incest Story.  I am selling my book online in hopes of reaching others who have been through this.
           Visit my HUBS, The Great Basin Gopher Snake and The Southern Pacific Rattler--I encounter amazing wildlife while hiking. Thanks for reading this..
      GarnetBird

    12. ehrendreich profile image61
      ehrendreichposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The social stigma for those with mental health issues can impact even practitioners. I have known many counselors and other care providers who do not really believe in recovery. I have some hubs that deal with what a mental illness means to a person and what self-compassion can do for a person who is struggling. I invite you to check them out.

      I learned what I have from years suffering with a diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder. I work with others now as a peer counselor, life coach, writer and teacher. I feel that I have something to learn from everyone.

      1. wyanjen profile image86
        wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Welcome to HubPages!
        You have a great approach. I like it when folks can accept the weight of the issue, and find ways to be positive.

        @ wordscribe: I took it last night. It was a frickin' disaster. Slept until 3 PM for crying out loud. So, I worked until 10pm. Wonderful day, right?

        But I feel real good after the sleep. No complaints there.
        I just need to find a quality / quantity balance tongue
        lol

        How are you hanging in there with your son's situation?

    13. kim1971 profile image59
      kim1971posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      hey everyone my name is kim and ive had major depressive disorder a
      majority of my life. its hard talking to people that just dont get it. yes im
      embarrest @ times, but it is still something i cannot help @ times. somedays i just dont want to face the world or anyone else. its an effort to
      perform any task of the day. im on lexepro xanax and seroquel. its just not
      helping me anymore. im a nurse and it has disabled me a lot in my profession. im going to see the shrink to get my meds changed. is anyone out there on adderall for add and mdd. i  also have add. i hate it.

      1. wyanjen profile image86
        wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        welcome to HP Kim

        Never worry about holding back here, just lay it out. It's easier (at least for me) to talk here about some things.

        I was taking seroquel for awhile - I got pretty sick from it. I give it a big thumbs down lol
        Once I stopped it, I had more energy and motivation.

        1. kim1971 profile image59
          kim1971posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          wow that was a fast response. im glad to here from u. good to see there
          are caring people. thanks for noticing. im in  a severe bout of depression
          right now. the seroquel i think is making it worse on top of the fact that im
          not on anything for the add. my brother is add and hes on adderral. he let
          me try one the other day and i was a different person. i could think! im going to ask my doc for this stuff.

          1. wyanjen profile image86
            wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Ask him about any alternatives to seroquel.

            I'm not in any position to say if it is good or bad for you.
            But it was bad for me
            smile

            1. kim1971 profile image59
              kim1971posted 6 years ago in reply to this

              i surely will. hope all is well with u. ill let u know what e says.

    14. 60
      paivabergposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Deleted

      1. figment profile image71
        figmentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Deleted

        1. Faybe Bay profile image83
          Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          He's a flamer and a spammer as well! That takes you to an Acai supplement site!

          1. Fluffymetal profile image78
            Fluffymetalposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I wasn't about to click on anything that guy had to say!

            1. Faybe Bay profile image83
              Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I don't believe he just came in here and said that. Anyway, I hoped it was some self-help group! acai... I can tell you right out what's wrong that caused mental illness to skyrocket. That is one of my goals, to shed light on what's going on.

              To be honest my mom was very ill, but very smart. She saw it all coming, and there was no one who would believe her.

              1. kim1971 profile image59
                kim1971posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                hey faybe i fell her pain

    15. Jaggedfrost profile image87
      Jaggedfrostposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I have never had the luxury of being ashamed and perhaps you can tell this by my more militant post.
      My conditions are severe enough that I have had to make sure that those who count in my life are very aware of what is going on because if I am not honest about my conditions then things get very bad in a hurry when my mind shifts foci and everyone is left in the dust or some problem gets to too big for my present emotional state and the Aspergers portion of my mind doesn't want to deal.
      I have noticed, however that the majority of those that I feel like I need to discuss reality with often on first contact treat it like a man treats any discussion of the ins and outs of a woman's period.  If I didn't feel the absolute need to be honest with them any way I know I would be effected by this reaction and be too self conscious by far to want to bring up the subject.

    16. nikki1 profile image60
      nikki1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      It takes a brave person to talk about this. I admire you. Talking is achieving in my opinion. As long as you laugh your mistakes off you are all good. Clean up your mistakes you make with others. And, know how to be humble. And, always talk about your feelings and experiences. I have faith in you. Hugs my friend. Never have an ordinary day. What do you go through?

    17. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The only people I feel most comfortable around are other mentally ill people

    18. schoolgirlforreal profile image76
      schoolgirlforrealposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I do feel embarrassed I think not sure why; well my family picks on me for it--they have issues too but deny them and self medicate and like to put the blame on me

      otherwise it's hard to ignore alot of the time because of the symptoms, I get very depressed, irritable, nervous around people--not all the time but enough ...I felt better when I worked full time...and I don't like being so overweight...i fell like i have only a few good days out of the month....hope htat changes

  2. double_frick profile image81
    double_frickposted 6 years ago

    honestly, i feel like people think i'm trying to get attention when i talk about it. so usually i don't.
    i guess i don't see what there is to discuss. lol

  3. 0
    Ghost32posted 6 years ago

    My wife was told for the first time, in a counseling session, that she'd been evaluated as SMI (Seriously Mentally Ill).  A very high-functioning example, but still SMI.

    Until then, she'd never shown embarrassment about her condition with all of its various manifestations...but at the same time, while she knew and admitted freely to pretty much anyone that she had mental health issues, or even that she was mentally ill per se, the addition of the word "Serious" threw her into a tailspin. 

    She's mentally brilliant as well, despite the beginning signs of dementia.  First, she thanked the counselor for being the first person to ever be honest with her.  Secondly, she looked back over her life and realized that she'd been SMI for most of her life if not all of it, based on things she'd said, felt, and done over the years.

    NOW she's showing signs of being embarrassed.  Struggling with it, but still embarrassed.

    She's now 58.

    1. double_frick profile image81
      double_frickposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      thats an inspiring story. smile
      your wife sounds like an amazing person.

    2. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Many of the very smart people I know and have met display some kind of mental illness from bipolar disorder to full blown schizophrenia. Makes little difference to me, I enjoy the brilliance and we manage the rest without problems as much as we can. You seem to be tolerant enough to see the brilliance. Nice. smile

  4. 0
    Ghost32posted 6 years ago

    She is.  Olympic-qualified gymnast as a teenager, 144 I.Q. as measured in high school, head of her class, at one time a practicing pharmacist, and to date the only person I personally know who had multiple personalities but decided they were trouble and evicted them single handed (both she and I believe these are real entities, not simply mental aberrations).  Been a race car driver, trucker, raised Arabian horses and silver blue Great Danes.

    Husband froze her out after more than 20 years of marriage, kept the dogs, horses, and kids.  She went homeless and survived nearly 3 years of that with a guy who stayed alive only because of HER survival skills.  She's 5 feet, 92 pounds.  He's dead now; only made it 9 months after I helped her out of that situation.  We've been hooked at the hip ever since.

    Oh, yeah.  Besides her ailments (an Encyclopedia needed for all of those), she's also a double black belt--in Tae Kwon Do and also Hapkido.  Got so good the other women wouldn't fight her in tournaments; she was taking out MEN.

    We're currently in our 14th year together.  For 12 of those, she's been so ill she could have "woke up dead" any morning...without exaggeration.   Yet here she still is, takes lickin' after lickin' and keeps on tickin'.

    1. 60
      foreignpressposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ghost32: ". . .the only person I personally know who had multiple personalities but decided they were trouble and evicted them single handed (both she and I believe these are real entities, not simply mental aberrations)."
      _________________________________________________________

      So you're saying she was actually "inhabited" by other entities (spirits or demons)? Then she performed a self-exorcism? If, in fact, that's what you're saying that is incredible and worthy of a hub by itself (in another category, of course). I would be most interested in hearing more about that. If not, that's quite okay.

  5. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    By the way, my views on mental illness? As long as society considers me insane I feel very comfortable with it! lol

  6. 0
    Ghost32posted 6 years ago

    Feel pretty safe, then, doya, Earnest? lol

    1. earnestshub profile image88
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yes I do ghost, the best ground to stand on is your own. I say use our idiosyncrasies to enlarge our scope! Viva la Difference! (hate french language! ) I was pretty rich and had time on my hands when younger, and spent a long time in therapy to improve my life, which had already become pretty good. Best money and time I ever spent. It certainly broadened what I will accept as "sane" especially after 3 years of dream analysis!
      The little bit of insanity on the outside ain't nothin! lol lol lol

      1. 0
        Deborah Sextonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        And who is to say that insanity isn't really sane and vice versa smile

        1. Susana S profile image92
          Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I believe my madness is total sanity - too in touch with the "real stuff". I'm coming to enjoy it and benefit from it!

        2. mega1 profile image80
          mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          well, now, that could be a little dangerous, thinking that way - if I thought you were really serious.  But since I've seen your opinions on depression in that other thread, I know you are not! big_smile:

  7. 0
    Ghost32posted 6 years ago

    You've certainly got that right.  Haven't been in therapy myself (though it's been recommended by certain family members who shall remain unnamed), but got my psych degree and kept going through marriages until I found a sincerely mental lady with both beauty and brains; can't get much better than that!

    When it comes to dream analysis, yeah, some of mine have been (and are) vewwy intwesting indeed.  And you're absolutely correct, this little thang on the outside ain't nuthin'.

    Thanks for reminding me. big_smile

    'Night, by the way.  Gotta get a couple hours, then go chase meds for the wife.

  8. cheaptrick profile image73
    cheaptrickposted 6 years ago

    Russell Crow did a film(based on a true story) about a schizophrenic man who was awarded the Noble prize in Physics"A beautiful mind".
    Normal is what the Majority is and has nothing to do with what kind of person one is.If no harm is done to self or others people should celebrate who they are rather than force themselves to conform to what they are not!

  9. kirstenblog profile image77
    kirstenblogposted 6 years ago

    Well I was diagnosed as borderline personality disorder, chronic depression, dysthmic disorder and PTSD and I am freakin proud! I guess I used to be embarrassed but have overcome all the symptoms associated with these disorders and feel proud and amazed at that accomplishment.

    I spent many years in and out of hospitals and if I start going on about stories of running away from them etc. I guess you could say I definitely lack the capacity for embarrassment!

    Is lack of embarrassment a new symptom I wonder lollollollollol

    1. figment profile image71
      figmentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      To kirstenblog: I was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder (along with several other illnesses) but BPD embarrasses me the most.  So I'm proud of you too!!!

      1. kirstenblog profile image77
        kirstenblogposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I only just found this post, thanks for the compliment big_smile

        BPD is sadly a very misunderstood condition. In my opinion this condition as it related to me was that it was a condition of the world I live in, crazy world, me sane! big_smile

      2. 0
        Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Dont ever let others ignorance dictate how you feel about yourself. You are a person with feelings, dreams, goals, hopes, fears, desires.....just like anyone else. So you go about things differently, big deal. Do whatever you must to be healthy and happy. Are people embarassed because they have cancer?

  10. NewYorker profile image81
    NewYorkerposted 6 years ago

    I have a brother who's a severe schizophrenic with OCD, a pathological liar and some more mental illnesses.

    I was always very ashamed of his condition, and so were my parents and everyone in my family. The only one who would not let the shame get to him and would not let anyone judge him was, in fact, my brother.

    Strange...

  11. wyanjen profile image86
    wyanjenposted 6 years ago

    I'm not embarrassed and sure as hell not ashamed.
    It's hard to feel that way after I've worked so hard to control it and be functional. smile

    I hesitate, in some situations, to mention it though. I don't care about the stigma, but I just can't stand it when somebody chalks me up to a "symptom".
    As in: She's only upset because she's bi-polar.

    No, I'm upset because you pissed me off. Not every reaction is a symptom.
    grrrr

    big_smile

    1. 0
      wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Grrr...  I don't blame you a bit.  I don't have Bipolar disorder, but severe chronic depression if I don't do what I "need to be doing"... if that makes sense.  Exercising, eating healthy, getting enough sleep, talking, seeing people, actually answering the phone (maybe the hardest one for some reason), etc...  This and all the things I've learned over the years to keep this beast at bay.  I've been sober since 1995 and truly believe I used alcohol to self treat my depression.  BTW, it doesn't work at all, just makes it much worse in the long run.

      No, I'm not embarrassed about any of it.  If someone judges me I know it's just from lack of education on the topic, or lack of experience.  I have great respect for all of you.  Wyanjen, you are a gem.  Thanks for the comments today.  smile

    2. efeyas profile image92
      efeyasposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I feel ya on that one!

  12. 0
    lyricsingrayposted 6 years ago

    yes.

    1. Hokey profile image60
      Hokeyposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Hey ghost! Don't be embarassed about something you have no control over silly.

  13. 0
    hamstersmessiahposted 6 years ago

    i am not my diagnosis so why should i be embarrassed?  i function quite well on medication and... who said that?  are you listening?  oh well...  yes i have Schizo-Affective Disorder but it's just like any other disease.  would you be ashamed to let people know you were a diabetic?  i am just thankful that the medication i am on allows me to function and contribute in some small way through my writing.

  14. WriteAngled profile image93
    WriteAngledposted 6 years ago

    What is normal? By the criteria of current society, many are considered to be mentally ill because they do not fit in. In other societies, these same people were the shamans, seers and prophets.

    1. Tadeusz598 profile image60
      Tadeusz598posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Are they? Can you give me some examples?

      I suspect that you are romanticising mental illness and the really there are very few such people in the west..

      1. 0
        B.C. BOUTIQUEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        many people do think they have disorders and disease that they do not have, it is called hypochondria I believe..but when the state finally says look, this is your mental problem and this is why you have it..then it is kind of hard to be romanticizing about that.

      2. 0
        china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I have to agree with rightangle here - she said were and in other societies. Joan of Arc springs to mind, but where else do you get visions and voices if not from inside your own head ? Today the only visionaries left, after the advent of medication, seem to be some artists.

  15. Sara Tonyn profile image61
    Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago

    I admit I am kind of embarrassed about it. But what really bugs me is having to 'defend' it to people who think simply singing 'High Hopes' will make it all disappear.

    Major depression, OCD, ADD, Bipolar II

    1. 0
      Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      wink its all in your head.....

      1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        And to you I say, "Flugelhorn!"

        1. 0
          Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I tried to say that to you a few days ago, but I forgot how to spell it!!!  lol

          1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
            Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            lol lol lol

    2. skyfire profile image73
      skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      What is ADD ?

      1. 0
        Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I have a hub about it  wink

        1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
          Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this
      2. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Attention Deficit Disorder

        (No Hyperactivity. Otherwise it would be ADHD.)
        (P.S. But I think ADHD is now the 'official' name.)

        1. skyfire profile image73
          skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Okay. Was curious to know if decision making panic-attacks, fear-of-failure comes under some disorder ?

          1. 0
            Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            im not promoting. i dont even have adsense...really read my ADD hub, it has usefull links. Good luck!

            1. skyfire profile image73
              skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Justine, just checked your hub, the link that you have placed for checking ADD is what i checked to test myself and i have to agree with this in your hub :



              Spot on..

              1. 0
                Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                do you have any idea how many times I proofread that, and now see the errors!?!?  oh well....
                smile

                1. skyfire profile image73
                  skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I guess we've to find credible sites and tests. I mean there are many home-made IQ/meyer-briggs tests. So unless there are credible sites we can't even take those sites seriously. Not sure where to look for credible site in medical domain, but will see if i can get any, will get back to your hub with the link of credible tests/site.

                  1. 0
                    Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    I know, right? Im either a genius, or a drooling idiot...
                    I dont have the luxoury of going to a doctor. Let me know what you find.

          2. Sara Tonyn profile image61
            Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Panic attacks are part of Panic Disorder (with or without agoraphobia) which is an anxiety disorder.

            There are lots of things that might trigger a panic attack. Maybe in your case decision making and fear of failure are at the root of your panic attacks?

            What did your doc diagnose you with?

            1. WriteAngled profile image93
              WriteAngledposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I get panic attacks occasionally. At one point, my GP doubled my dose of citalopram to help me cope with anxiety about my divorce settlement, losing my house, etc. I then started getting panic attacks daily so I went cold turkey on the citalopram. I ended up with a year's supply unused in my bathroom cabinet. Started feeling bleak again recently, so have decided to go back on it for a couple of months, but at half the last dose!

              1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
                Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I understand. I keep Xanax on hand cuz I still have an occasional panic attack. I used to take one or two tablets and they worked pretty well. But when I take Xanax with the meds I'm on now, the Xanax hits me like a brick! I can't take more than half a tablet or I'll fall asleep soon afterwards and be groggy the entire next day.

            2. skyfire profile image73
              skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              yet to consult with doc.

              Advice i got from parents and friends is, stop investing in stocks for next 4-6 months you'll be normal. Lol.

              1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
                Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                lol Have to agree with them. I rarely look at how my stocks are doing now.

                At one time I burned through a bundle of $$$ playing stupid penny stocks for a laugh. Not laughin' about that stupid idea now. Sheesh.

          3. mega1 profile image80
            mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            yep - its the high intelligence disorder, commonly known as "genius"  people who aren't intelligent don't know enough to have panic attacks and have no idea that their decisions aren't always right!  I've met some people recently who are so cruelly un-intelligent that they don't realize how stupid some of the judgments they make are - so consider your panic a sign of a high-functioning brain.

            1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
              Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Are you serious or just pulling his leg?

              Any sort of reference you can point me to that would support that? I don't recall ever hearing about any such connection.

              1. wyanjen profile image86
                wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Ignorance is bliss.
                smile

              2. mega1 profile image80
                mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I am rather serious about this - I just have a theory that if you're smart enough to know that in the past some of your decisions had disastrous consequences, you will of course panic some when you have to make decisions.  If you are not very smart you just keep stumbling along and never feel too bad about making stupid choices.   Of course, I don't have anything that corroborates my theory.  I just believe this is so.  If you wanted to research it, you might find some evidence supporting it.  I seem to remember hearing somewhere that certain mental illnesses most often show up in very intelligent people, but then I am not an authority - just another crazy!

                1. mega1 profile image80
                  mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I just did the search for "Intelligence and mental illness" and found a surprising number of entries on the subject and now I am very excitedly reading through the info - I may be able to back-up my theory after all!  do you know? that would make a big difference in how a lot of people relate to the world if they can take an IQ test and explain part of their psychology this way - sometimes simple answers are true!

                  1. skyfire profile image73
                    skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Well i can back your this theory up a bit. But i can't say that i qualify enough for that much intelligent to be getting into disorder (or maybe i do, not sure you people & doc decide). big_smile

                    Here is what i found personally, more rational thinking you do and try to socialize you'll find the logical fallacies/self bias/confirmation bias in people(quite natural after looking at the cognitive dissonance theory), and you'll find clashing with religion/political or simply irrational people. You'll always find yourself into conflict if you think rational all time. And to avoid this If you isolate yourself from crowd(society) then you're doomed either you'll be hannibal lecter/or some person locked up in cell. Thing is society is working on irrational chains of rules, which any rational person can sense and talk about. Opposing society in brute force method simply ends up frustration, panic attacks and isolation and more likely those people end up in mental disorder. So far i managed to find this much out.

                  2. Sara Tonyn profile image61
                    Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Oh, yeah. There's a definite connection between intelligence and mental illness. But it's not a certainty or easily understood.

                    There are plenty of brilliant people who don't suffer from a mental illness and plenty of mentally ill people who are nowhere near being geniuses.

                    Initially I thought you knew of some connection between Panic Disorder (specifically) and intelligence. That's why I asked if you knew of any reference material. But a connection of some sort between intelligence and mental illness in general is pretty much accepted. It's probably the basis for expressions such as "There's a fine line between genius and madness" (or however it's worded!).

      3. 0
        hamstersmessiahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        just another way of doctor's extracting money from an eager public who wants to find something wrong with the way they are because they don't fit in to the cookie cutter assembly line of society.  honestly i would love to go off my medication and just be who i am supposed to be but i've tried that and all they do is lock me up.

        1. 0
          Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          nobody wants you to be locked up!!  smile

          1. 0
            hamstersmessiahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            i've been there...  unwillingly in a state facility and it's not pretty...  so i stay on my meds until normies can deal with people who are tapped in to a different consciousness.  i will be a good little patient and feed the doctors and nurses what they want to hear because my crime is having a "disorder" that this society can't accept.

            1. 0
              Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

              well...looks like your among the norm here.  smile

  16. lorlie6 profile image85
    lorlie6posted 6 years ago

    I can't imagine a future when mental illness is not stigmatized.  "Those crazies" are the bums, the homeless, the people we simply wish would go away. And medicated 'normies' like myself have had to go through a twisted system to become comfortable in this world.  I've been diagnosed with so many "illnesses" that I've almost lost count, but they've mostly arisen from a feeling of alienation. 
    So many of we 'artists' suffer from such conditions, it almost seems necessary-or conditional to our expression.
    Great thread.

    1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
      Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You hit on a great point. I really hate taking meds because they blunt the extremely creative 'high' I used to get. Of course they also keep me from sinking into serious depression so...

      1. wyanjen profile image86
        wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        hmm. hmm

        I planned all week long to be writing this afternoon but the best I can manage so far has been to play boggle and check the forums a little.
        I'm very bummed out by this. But I can't walk away from the 'puter either, because my plan was to be writing. Is it worse to give up, or feel like a JA while I sit here wasting time?

        Yay, meds. woo hoo. tongue

      2. skyfire profile image73
        skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        We need "Hub-mySin" tablets to get over writers block.

      3. lorlie6 profile image85
        lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        So do I, Sara!!!  Without them I went into such creative bliss it amazed me.  Alas, though, I also went on insane, really insane, shopping sprees, so I simply can't afford my 'biochemical imbalance' any longer. lol

        1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
          Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          YES! Yay for mania! lol


          Yep. I laugh at the national debt now. In a really manic phase, I could top that pittance easily! lol

          1. lorlie6 profile image85
            lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            But without mania, how am I going to write the Great American Novel?  Damn these pills! lol

            1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
              Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I know!

              I've written a whopping 6 hubs in 6 months and the only creative one is about death! lol

              1. lorlie6 profile image85
                lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                My personal favorite!!!

              2. lorlie6 profile image85
                lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Don't feel alone, Sara, I've been here 8 months and have 18 on record.  Mania can't be forever, girl! lol

                1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
                  Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  True but it rarely visits anymore... sad

                  1. lorlie6 profile image85
                    lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Yep, my last was in June.  Dang.  Oh well, we just have to think up some other method...umm, Weed?  Meth?  How's about a bit of Coke? 
                    JUST kidding-but I am in total agreement with you, mania's a blast.

          2. lorlie6 profile image85
            lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Exactly...those fools in Washington moaning at the National Debt.  What do they know? lol

  17. WriteAngled profile image93
    WriteAngledposted 6 years ago

    Maybe we need to be mad to be a hubber, heh, heh.

    1. 0
      Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      awhile back there was a thread asking for ideas for a new hubpages tagline
      I said it should be..." were all mad here"  (from Alice in Wonderlans)

      1. lorlie6 profile image85
        lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol

  18. kirstenblog profile image77
    kirstenblogposted 6 years ago

    It's funny I just was reminded of something I saw the other day about med companies importing the meds we westerners have known for years to countries like china and japan. The gist of the comments were about how those countries used to place some of these disorders in high respect in their cultures and our meds are changing attitudes toward mental illness because of it. An example would be a society that considers depression a spiritual state to be sought after now being flooded with pills to feel better. I really do wonder if we are not missing a trick here by not valuing those who experience this world in an altered was from the norm.....

  19. karent profile image80
    karentposted 6 years ago

    I have bipolar disorder and I'm no more embarrassed about it than my husband is about his diabetes.  I do admit that I get my feathers ruffled when they run news stories about something that someone with a mental illness did and then focus on the mental illness.  People will jump on the bandwagon and start talking about mental illness as some sort of plague.  I have always been honest about my disorder and find that friends can help me manage my behavior better by knowing what to look for and to help me with. My disorder has helped me to be who I am and accomplish many things in my life, so I'm not embarrassed.

    1. lorlie6 profile image85
      lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      karent, that takes alot of courage, and I commend you for it.  Your husband and friends sound amazing.  Mine still dismiss it-I was diagnose with Bi-Polar only a year ago.

      1. karent profile image80
        karentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I don't run around and tell everyone, but I tell close friends and family so they can alert me to my moods and behaviors.  One of the most common things when you are bipolar is to think that you are fine and everyone else has the problem, so it really helps me when a friend can tell me that I'm getting overly negative, talking too fast, overreacting, etc.  I'm assuming that the average person is able to self-monitor these things.  There's no shame in having help with that if you need it.

        1. 0
          Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Its so amazing you can see that. There are people I dearly love who insist I cant accept them, they refuse to see the behaviour patterns, it must be me...being judgemental. Kudos to you. smile

    2. Sara Tonyn profile image61
      Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Good for you, Karen! big_smile

  20. 0
    china manposted 6 years ago

    Everyone around me seems to be mentally ill, so I guess that will be me then.

    The most interesting friends I have are those diagnosed with something, some of the most interesting writers and forum posters on here seem to be in this thread. Nothing to be embarrassed about I would say.

    1. 0
      Justine76posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      yeehaw.  smile  You cant help how your born. You are who you are. Live it, love it, own it. Just dont hide behind it to be cruel to others, or ignore medical help if your suffering.

      1. 0
        china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks for your concern Justine. All my family think I am crazy to disappear to China, most of them are in mortgage debt and struggling with s**tty jobs - while I live in fair luxury, teach around 500 pretty young ladies anything and any way I choose as long as it is in English, I have 3 months paid holiday a year and travel to every interesting location in China for fun without breaking the pay bank that I get here, Oh yes, beer is 0.22 dollars and my partner is the prettiest girl I have ever met. Clearly they are all sane and I am the crazy one!

        But are you suggesting that I am cruel to others ?

  21. habee profile image92
    habeeposted 6 years ago

    I don't suffer from my craziness - I rather enjoy it!

  22. privateye2500 profile image59
    privateye2500posted 6 years ago

    These days I don't think I know of ONE single person who has not be *diagnosed* with a mental illness.  The term is so broadly used that it runs from alcoholism/addiction/GAD/ADD/ADHD/mild depression, etc....

    One example - short form - friends son of 4 is just a rambunctious<--sp? kid.  They want to stick him on meds right out of the gate.

    Medicate everyone - drugs companies get filthy richer (and the dr.s) - everyone else walks around like a sombie?  Little kids??

    COME ON!

    People are all different - we are not robots and while, OF COURSE, there are people who NEED medication; there are a massive percentage who don't and take them anyway cuz *the dr. said so*.

    Bunk.

    And if you do have a mental illness, SO WHAT!?

    Nothing to be ashamed of!

    Is cancer to be ashamed of?  diabities? MS?  etc...ad finium.

  23. donotfear profile image92
    donotfearposted 6 years ago

    Absolutely not ashamed of it. It's not an illness, it's a personality trait to me. Why be ashamed of the way one is wired? Heck I know I'm obsessive!!!  At east I found a name for it! HA!

    1. lorlie6 profile image85
      lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      GOOD for YOU, gal-I love your attitude!

      1. Tammy Lochmann profile image87
        Tammy Lochmannposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        No one should ever be ashamed of having an illness.

  24. 0
    wordscribe41posted 6 years ago

    Funny, Susana and wyanjen.  I've moved on to Rock Stars now (I know, I know), I get a bunch of well-deserved grief about it.  My advice:  don't get started on them, 'k???  They are addicting in a surprising number of ways.

    Wyanjen, I'm not sure whaddup about the whole 11-4 thing, either.  I've always been this way to some extent, but lately I just really can't write worth *hit in the day.  I love nights when everyone else is asleep, that's part of the lure for me somehow.  I KNOW for certain no one in this house will bother me. 

    I have to be really careful about this, though 'cause I can easily get my sleep schedule all flipped.  Then, I get depressed.  Why does it all seem so complicated?  UGH!

  25. sabrebIade profile image85
    sabrebIadeposted 6 years ago

    Considering that about one in four adults suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder it shouldn't bother anyone.

  26. 0
    Pani Midnyte Odinposted 6 years ago

    I think it can be embarrassing at times. Like when my mother announces to a room full of strangers that I spent time in a mental institution and they should be careful with my feelings. I know she was trying to get them to stop talking about a certain topic, but it was embarrassing to spend the rest of the evening with people staring at me as if they were afraid of what I might do.

    1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
      Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The important thing to keep in mind is that you're not alone. That doesn't make you feel any better during one of those uncomfortable moments though.

  27. love my yorkies profile image62
    love my yorkiesposted 6 years ago

    I joke about having ADD, helps me deal with it a little better.  The other illnesses I have, I have only shared with a very few close friends as some of them are hereditary.

  28. mega1 profile image80
    mega1posted 6 years ago

    Craziness is becoming the norm - I believe that.  It should make me feel better about myself, but since I am OCD, PTSD, narcissistic and a few other things - I can't feel better.  I just have to deal with it.  and it's not like people wouldn't know if I didn't tell them - wish it were so.  I was always considered eccentric by some and deranged by others - so I choose carefully who I listen to!  But, part of my "illness" precludes me ever feeling embarrassed - if somebody recognizes my ailment, I just have to agree.  I've learned to accept that this is part of what makes me creative and full of new ideas and fun.   'course it also makes me grouchy, moody, and sometimes a little mean, but if I am told it shows, in a quiet, nice way I snap right out of it!   SNAP! One thing is I don't like to be physically touched much, so the cyber life is very ideal for me.   please, feed the crazies!  feed with kindness, respect and understanding! but keep a respectful distnce!

    1. 0
      wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      He he he.  I agree it has its creative perks.  That has to play a part in the whole picture...  I really do.  Sylvia Plath comes to mind, among many others. 

      I see you ditched the kitty.  smile

      1. mega1 profile image80
        mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        yeh - the kitty was too sweet - this little girl with lamby is also getting to me - I was a devil for awhile earlier but that was tooooo out there - so I'm currently searching for something that will express who I am today.  stay tuned!

  29. WriteAngled profile image93
    WriteAngledposted 6 years ago

    All praise to us crazies. We have the skills and the knowledge to triumph. We'll get by with our ridiculous body clocks while the 9-5 managers lose their credibility and ultimately their jobs.

    1. Susana S profile image92
      Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Life would sure be boring if we were all sane wink

      People who think, who analyse, who weigh stuff up, are far more interesting in my world view and unfortunately they are the same people who feel very, very low sometimes. It's the downside of being an idealist and a thinker.

      1. 0
        wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Well said on all counts.  It's also interesting how quite a few of us have been on the ACOA thread (adult children of alcoholics)...  Maybe we are thrust into being thinkers and feelers early on...  I know I had to be introspective to stay sane.

    2. wyanjen profile image86
      wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      yup.

      My philosophy is: If you're going to bitch about something, then you also have to salute something that is good.

      My good thing:
      Since my divorce I've been living alone. Bad idea for somebody like me.
      My mornings are so bad between the sleeping problem and the sleep walking problem, I just can't seem to get my stuff straight and get to work on time with a nice schedule.
      My boss knows quite a bit about my situation. My shift starts at 7AM. He has said to me, if I'm not going to make it by 9 or 9:30, give him a call so he knows I'm OK.

      My own private trade-off for that is to kick butt once I get there. I keep the presses rolling, on time and all day long. smile

    3. Sara Tonyn profile image61
      Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      So when do we plan to take over the world?

      I hope it's at night...

      1. mega1 profile image80
        mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        tonight is good for me!  day off tomorrow!

        1. 0
          wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Works for me, too!  Just watching the Olympics and all.

          1. mega1 profile image80
            mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I know this is silly, but I really thought we had ALREADY taken over the world!

            1. Faybe Bay profile image83
              Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I thought everyone left and went to bed

              1. Susana S profile image92
                Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                We are all different time zones smile I'm awake and up for a chat!

              2. Faybe Bay profile image83
                Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Guess so, it's not even 7 pm where I am. I am just catching up on eight days worth of thread. My mother took me to be analyzed before puberty even hit, my brother too.  We were just upset our dad was dead but she was sure we were ill. It runs in the family. When we say 'you're sick again' it isn't the flu. I was pleased to find I am not the only one who fights the battle without meds. I know we are smart enough to want to avoid the side effects and yet have to lean once in awhile

                1. Susana S profile image92
                  Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Sad she couldn't just talk to you about your loss and had to make someone else do it sad Meds or no meds, I think it's a personal choice. I go from one to the other, lol lol

      2. WriteAngled profile image93
        WriteAngledposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Tomorrow night!!!

        1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
          Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Not another Valentine's Day massacre, I hope!

  30. mega1 profile image80
    mega1posted 6 years ago

    this answer was posted in WikiAnswers:

    "Highly intelligent people are more likely to be able to recognise the onset of mental illness, and to take the necessary psychological steps to prevent it becoming noticeable or out of control. Their habit of analysing, although it may seem to others to lead to more stress, leads to long term solutions to their problems. Highly intelligent people can recognise stress, and take the necessary steps to overcome it."

    makes sense to me!

  31. Susana S profile image92
    Susana Sposted 6 years ago

    One of the best books I ever read was "The spiritual advantages of a painful childhood". One of the things it talks about is how highly developed our intuition and empathy become when we are frightened all the time. We try to predict the behaviour of others in order to keep ourselves as safe as we can. These talents can serve us well in adulthood if we recognize them smile

    1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
      Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Now that really makes sense to me. Thanks for mentioning the book. I'll make a point of reading it! smile

      1. Susana S profile image92
        Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes Sara it's definitely worth a read! It helps change the mindset around from victim to someone blessed with unique talents smile

    2. lorlie6 profile image85
      lorlie6posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I just phoned the local bookstore and ordered it, Susana-they said the primary title is Legacy of the Heart by a Wayne Muller.  Is this the same one?

      1. Susana S profile image92
        Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, that's it smile

        1. earnestshub profile image88
          earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Good hubness ladies, how constructive you are! Well done both of you! smile

          1. Susana S profile image92
            Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I don't think anything can kill off the hublove smile

            EDIT: Not from me anyway smile

      2. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I found it on Amazon for $10.08 and it's eligible for free shipping with orders of $25+.

        Is that a better deal?

        http://www.amazon.com/Legacy-Heart-Spir … 0671797840

  32. love my yorkies profile image62
    love my yorkiesposted 6 years ago

    I guess this means I'm "highly intelligent"!  I just knew it had to be true no matter what the voices tell me.

    1. mega1 profile image80
      mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      oh - don't joke around about the voices!  they will get you bad!  one dr told me that most people's "auditory hallucinations" or "the voices" almost never say anything positive!

      1. skyfire profile image73
        skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        eat sugar. eat meat. drink.  big_smile

        1. mega1 profile image80
          mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          go buy a bong and some kona gold!

  33. Sara Tonyn profile image61
    Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago

    All kidding aside, this discussion has really been therapeutic for me. big_smile

    I'll be in fine spirits when we take over the world tomorrow night.

    1. 0
      wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      For me, as well.  Thanks, Figment for starting the topic.  See ya'll tomorrow night, then.

      1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Till then! smile

    2. wyanjen profile image86
      wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, this was a great afternoon for me too.
      I've made a few new friends in the process.

      I love that the internet lets you meet folks who also never leave their houses. lol

      Take care all

      Peace
      Jen

  34. skyfire profile image73
    skyfireposted 6 years ago

    Ah me too off for sleep.

    1. 0
      wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sleep well, skyfire.

  35. Sara Tonyn profile image61
    Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago

    Wordscribe is right. This is a great topic, figment. Thanks!

    @skyfire G'nite!

  36. mega1 profile image80
    mega1posted 6 years ago

    Parents often have their own problems and are so afraid their children will have problems - in the process they create problems! or they just don't understand.   Back in the 60's it was horrific! as you can imagine, many parents were looking for an answer when their kids didn't want to live by the same social rules they had . . . and so - shock treatments, very heavy meds, making teens into guinea pigs for the psych establishment etc etc etc  - and nowadays it is some better.  Still just knowing that people with closed minds, even if they are related to you, will not have the answers you need, and believing in your own intuitions about yourself will help so very much.

    1. Susana S profile image92
      Susana Sposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Not sure it's much better for lots of children now - I'm thinking of the ones getting pumped full of ritalin.

      Believing in yourself helps very much indeed!

  37. CodyPhrenism profile image76
    CodyPhrenismposted 6 years ago

    I understand completely, I try not to discuss anything involving my mental illness unless it's someone that I absolutely know is there to try and understand me. Using it as an excuse is unacceptable to me but seeking advice and help is admirable.

    1. wyanjen profile image86
      wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You've lost your 'e' lol

      An excuse means that a person is avoiding responsibility.
      Bad.

      A reason means that a person understands the cause of the problem but also accepts the responsibility.
      Good.

      I think about this distinction quite a bit. When something goes wrong, I run it through.
      Even if it's only privately, by avoiding the "excuse" I can stop myself from spiraling down.

      An excuse comes from a position of weakness. A reason puts you in a position of strength.

      smile

  38. Misha profile image76
    Mishaposted 6 years ago

    I don't have mental issues, therefore I don't suffer, therefore it does not embarrass me. smile

    I feel like a minority on this site though sad

    1. 0
      Deborah Sextonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Heyy!
      Many people here have accused me of being M.I. however I'm not either.

    2. mega1 profile image80
      mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      hang around for awhile and let us tell you what's wrong with you!  lol

    3. wyanjen profile image86
      wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You're not actually a minority; there are just not a lot of threads that go on about how cool it is to not be crazy lol

      1. mega1 profile image80
        mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I could almost get embarrassed about that reply! big_smile:  almost, but not quite

        1. wyanjen profile image86
          wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Embarrassed by this reply? lol
          Nah.

          It's better to be the minority. The best things in life... never seem to involve being in the majority of anything. lol

          1. Faybe Bay profile image83
            Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            truer words never spoken, the problem is the commercials make it appear that the whole world is crazy... That would put us in the majority... Think if the majority of the world went on that med... Nah, forget it don't think about that.

            1. mega1 profile image80
              mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

              what do you think about tv commercials for prescribed medications - in general not just for depression etc. but all the other ones including male "enhancement"?   - it makes me very uncomfortable and I think they go way too far.

              1. earnestshub profile image88
                earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                They do provide a bit of humour for my idea of what is funny!
                Ridiculous? You Betcha! lol

          2. mega1 profile image80
            mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            "You're not actually a minority; there are just not a lot of threads that go on about how cool it is to not be crazy"

            forgive me but I interpreted that as saying that THIS thread was going on about how cool it IS to BE crazy - and that is just not true.   do you see how I got that impression?  just using the word "crazy" doesn't fit your earlier posts at all!  so I don't understand the whole reply now - never mind, not that important.

            1. wyanjen profile image86
              wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              lol
              sorry, that's the opposite of my point.
              You know me better than that smile

              If the forums were filled with threads from people who talk about NOT having mental illness, then it wouldn't seem like we are the majority.
              I was just having fun with Misha's post.

              Sorry I used the "C" word though, if it bothers you. I apologize.
              I'm not a very PC person - that's not even the worst word I use when I'm talking about myself - but it isn't meant to be demeaning or insulting.

              smile

              1. mega1 profile image80
                mega1posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                oh crap - I use crazy and demented and worse all the time myself - and I'm about as PC as an iguana.  I didn't get all bent about it - just wondered.  Now I sound like an OCD person or something!  OH, waitaminute, I am an OCD person!  lol

                1. wyanjen profile image86
                  wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  yeah, that post did sound a little strange... until you consider the smart-a$$ factor.

                  It can be way too easy on a forum for a misunderstanding like that to happen. I was only a little worried that my language was offensive. That happens sometimes...

                  http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-signs038.gif

              2. Faybe Bay profile image83
                Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I see I used the c word also, poor etiquette on my part. But the Dr. did tell my brother "You're mother is CRAZY" And my brother said, I know she has a lot of problems... the Dr interupted and said, "No she is crazy, and I don't use that term lightly.
                So, we, in our family, since insanity runs in the family, just try not to go to the C place. Five of us, and not a sane one, truly, in the bunch.

                1. wyanjen profile image86
                  wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I believe that "offended" is something that people decide to be.
                  As in the phrase "take offense".

                  I never decide to be offended. This is why I can be a little tone-deaf sometimes.
                  smile

  39. Madison22 profile image79
    Madison22posted 6 years ago

    No it does not.

  40. 70
    Msgracieposted 6 years ago

    Well, to be honest and frank, I have not been diagnosed with a mental illness...However, I have a friend that has OCD and also Attention Deficit...she also is extremely nervous on many things.  However, she doesn't share it with everyone....she was recently diagnosed and it does embarass her.  She has been trying to get help regarding jobs, etc...but she is feeling that she has those issues, but she is capable of doing for herself....she has a lot of pride and although she has been diagnosed, she doesn't want her mental isssues to get in the way of her life...However, due to her not being more open about it she has lost several great jobs due to her inability to handle all the working situations.  I feel that no, you should not feel or be obligated to tell everyone about your issue, but only when it can be the most helpful to you.  You shouldn't be embarassed either, if you are unable to help your situation.... Also, they want to check her for depression, she is somewhat reluctant and doesn't want to deal with it...Also, she feels that she is treated as if she is uncapable of things and feels as if she is treated as if she (forgive what I say, as these are her words) stupid, retarded, or slow learner...she says she isn't but has issues and just wanted to be treated fairly.

  41. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 6 years ago

    It is understandable that someone like your friend feels like that, when society's attitudes to mental illness have been so bad in the past. sad

  42. mega1 profile image80
    mega1posted 6 years ago

    It's taken many years for me to speak openly and I can talk about it noe with you because I doubt if anything I say here will come back and bite me.  I feel now that it is good to share experiences online like this because every once in awhile, someone says something that opens a door for me. 

    For instance earlier we were talking about intelligence and mental illness - how many times is it that people who are diagnosed or perceived as mentally ill are just very intelligent and have problems associated with their high IQs?  I don't know the answer to this so now I am researching it and finding some very interesting stuff about intelligence, creativity, and incidence of some mental illnesses.  And one thing I'm thinking is that the doctors would be well advised to ask patients for their opinions about their own illnesses, causes and treatments etc. but they seldom do that.

    So in my opinion, openly discussing one's illness (mental or otherwise) is part of the healing.  I think you can tell your friend that over time she will have better experiences talking about it than not talking about it.   Isolating one's self and trying to ignore the problem just makes some new worse problems for people.

    But I am very cautious because most people's underlying attitudes, even well-educated otherwise open-minded people, are very demeaning, condescending, overly polite sometimes, and sometimes just mean about it.  People make inconsiderate jokes, and repeat all the out-dated myths and misconceptions.  It is hard sometimes to just stay silent around people like that, but that is best.

    No one I work with or who hires me needs to know about my diagnoses - they know I am "eccentric" but I am not dangerous, or stupid, or overtly "crazy" so I get by.  Many would be surprised to hear about my daily struggles - but I would probably be surprised to hear about some struggles going on out there too.

    1. 0
      china manposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Nice way to put it all. Also - being different is often an asset to society in many ways, creativity the most obvious; and the first monkey who sat down and really thought about it all was different to the rest. Happy Chinese New Year to everyone in here by the way we are at last officially 2010 solar and lunar, and I hope valentine brings something more cuddly than just a card.

      1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Gung hay fat choy! big_smile

  43. wyanjen profile image86
    wyanjenposted 6 years ago

    pardon my interruption:

    I have been screwing around all day with a project, getting nowhere and getting frustrated.
    Just now, I figured out the problem with my format - which has caused me to stall so long.

    it is now 10:24 EST.

    Is this spooky? Or am I making too much out of the 11PM - 4AM window.
    Anyway, I'll be up til at least 1AM to finish this project.

    Off to the races I go big_smile

    1. 0
      wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      But, you were just a little early...  10:24 and all...  It's 9:55 here and I'm at least an hour and 5 minutes away from anything productive.  What's your project?

      1. wyanjen profile image86
        wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        neutral
        I'm stuck again, and ready to abandon it.

        I'm trying to make charts that compare the planets. I'm still learning how to use iWork lol so I'm not real good at it.

        I get the spreadsheet built up, and I make a neat little chart, but the problem is Jupiter. And, Saturn. They are so much bigger that they make the little planets disappear right off the chart...

        1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
          Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          This is for work?

          1. wyanjen profile image86
            wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            No, I'm working on a hub about the planets.
            It's supposed to be "fun"
            lol

            1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
              Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Well, just leave the huge planets off the graph and explain their absences by saying they're currently on the other side of the sun. lol

              1. 0
                wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                You are brilliant, Sara!!!

              2. wyanjen profile image86
                wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                lol lol
                I could get away with that... I put some goofy stuff on these types of hubs...

                I have an idea to cut out the middle of the chart, so you only see the detail at the very beginning and the very end. I just can't figure out how. (yet)

                @ wordscribe: This software came with the Mac upgrade I did over the holidays. I was blown away by how cool it is... I really want to use it for this hub!
                grrr

                lol
                what is your project tonight?

                1. 0
                  wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Formulation in progress.  I go back and forth between the commercial and what I REALLY want to write about.  I hate how I need $$$.  It's a commercial night, but I might ditch it and go for the creative.

        2. 0
          wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Never heard of iWork.  Darn those over-sized planets!  lol  Sorry you're stuck.

  44. wyanjen profile image86
    wyanjenposted 6 years ago

    http://i665.photobucket.com/albums/vv19/wyanjen/mercury-chart-1-1.jpg
    Pluto is just a tiny little speck... tongue

    Not what I am trying to do lol lol

    1. 0
      wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Looks pretty darn good, though.  A heck of a lot better than the stick figure type crap I would come up with.

    2. Faybe Bay profile image83
      Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Graph looks great, if Pluto being a speck bothers you back it up with the fact that now it's not a planet anymore which threw out everything my son learned in school the first six years.

  45. skyfire profile image73
    skyfireposted 6 years ago

    Ah cosmology in the morning, phew.

    1. 0
      hamstersmessiahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      i love the smell of napalm on my pancakes, er, sorry, maple syrup.

  46. 0
    hamstersmessiahposted 6 years ago

    In answer to the question, after much thought, it only embarrasses me that I can't make a decent living at it.

  47. Sara Tonyn profile image61
    Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago

    Every time I think of an idea for a hub it loses its appeal or practicality in 30 seconds.

    1. wyanjen profile image86
      wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I could make a chart showing that statistic, if you like
      lol

      1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol Please do! And label it "Sara Tonyn's Attention Span." lol

        1. wyanjen profile image86
          wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Really?

          Okey dokey, be right back

          lol

    2. skyfire profile image73
      skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      That's why i'm stuck on 10 hubs.

      1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I have a boatload of unpublished hubs. Each one sounded like a great idea until I looked at it the next day. sad

        1. skyfire profile image73
          skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I want to write about free-will and some other religious/social topics, but scrapped the idea after looking at the condition of forums. I'm going to write some commercial ones now to get things going.

          1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
            Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Maybe you can combine the two. Like... A commercial hubs about world religions.

            1. skyfire profile image73
              skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              that's good idea..have to look up for keywords for that.

              1. Faybe Bay profile image83
                Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                skyfire, i checked out your hubs, and no wonder you are blocked. You are tech and socio/psych/religious. You work so hard. I suggested a movie you may or may not have.

                1. skyfire profile image73
                  skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Thanks for the comment Faybe, i'll check out "BLEEP Do We Know".

                  1. Faybe Bay profile image83
                    Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Thanks,I am sure I ran into you for a reason, it may keep you writing infinitely, it is random number generated and sooo cool smile

  48. 0
    wordscribe41posted 6 years ago

    Skyfire, I enjoyed our japanese exchange on the other thread.  smile  Sara, I so know what you mean about losing interest in a hub idea.  I've been through 3 already.  Now I'm stuck on:  Those With Mental Illness ROCK!

    1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
      Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I like it. Maybe you could conduct interviews with a few ...er...examples.

      1. 0
        wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        So, Sara.  Question #1) As a person suffering from clinical depression, what exactly DOES the eye in your avatar represent?  Is it the window to your soul?  Were you depressed when you chose the avatar? 

        I'm suddenly being weird.  Sorry.

        1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
          Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          No, I just had the camera backwards.

          I can't do anything right... *sigh*

          1. 0
            wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            lol lol lol  and a few more.

    2. skyfire profile image73
      skyfireposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I enjoyed as well,wordscribe41. smile

  49. figment profile image71
    figmentposted 6 years ago

    Thanks to all your posts to my forum.  It makes me feel proud to admit that I have been diagnosed with not only Borderline Personality Disorder, but also Bipolar, Major Depressive Disorder, and ADHD.  I think I'll write a Hub about all us "crazy" Hubbers.  Hope I didn't offend anybody by using word crazy.

    1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
      Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      This is the best thread I've seen/read/posted to since I joined HubPages. Thank you! smile

      1. figment profile image71
        figmentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        WOW!! No thank you!!

    2. 0
      wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No offense at all.  Your thread has been a great source of healing for a lot of us, figment.  It's where all the "cool hubbers" are IMHO.  lol  Thanks for starting it.

      1. figment profile image71
        figmentposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Your so welcome!! It was my first forum to post.

        1. Faybe Bay profile image83
          Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Thank you figment if you come back and see this. I have enjoyed the forum.

    3. Faybe Bay profile image83
      Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      figment, I have been looking for you. I am working on a hub, but wish there was a way to show you first, is that possible here?

      1. Faybe Bay profile image83
        Faybe Bayposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Ah my anxiety rears it's ugly head, I am off topic, I know. The hub is on topic, but I do not want to offend anyone, not with this one it is too important to me.

  50. wyanjen profile image86
    wyanjenposted 6 years ago

    Sorry Sara, I had to do a little bit of internet stalking for your chart.

    Well, I really only had to read your profile...

    1. wyanjen profile image86
      wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      http://i665.photobucket.com/albums/vv19/wyanjen/saratonyn.jpg

      1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
        Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol lol lol lol lol

        That's beautiful! lol

        1. wyanjen profile image86
          wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Well, Detroit / Cleveland people are Frenemies.

          As in, I root for the Indians - except when they are playing against my Tigers. Then, you are going DOWN baby...

          I will miss the Evil Eric Wedge.

          1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
            Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Cool. That's fair. I'll do the reverse... though I suspect the Tribe may be going down no matter what...

            Even with Eric the Wedge gone...

            1. wyanjen profile image86
              wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I'm not holding my breath for the Tigers... they gutted the roster lol

              1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
                Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Our roster now consists of guys who don't even shave yet. They have to bring notes from their mothers in order to play.

                1. wyanjen profile image86
                  wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  lol
                  We're going to have a few Toledo MudHens on the roster this year. Aww, they're so cute when they're young
                  lol

      2. drej2522 profile image86
        drej2522posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        awesome jen..awesome! smile

        1. wyanjen profile image86
          wyanjenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Thank you (bows humbly)

          Now, why is it again that I don't get my work done...
          hmm...

          1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
            Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Tell people you wrote an invisible hub.

            1. 0
              hamstersmessiahposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              heh i managed to write a review tonight... something i never do...  and i have a trip i'm leaving on in less than 2 days...  what am i doing here?

              1. 0
                wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                I ask myself that question constantly.  Congrats on writing the review today.  Oh look:  a robin!

              2. Sara Tonyn profile image61
                Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Where are ya trippin' to?

      3. 0
        wordscribe41posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        That is the BEST damn thing I've seen in ages.  Good lord, I love it!  I'm having WAY too much fun here.  Now off to write...  Oh look:  a pretty butterfly!

        1. Sara Tonyn profile image61
          Sara Tonynposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          lol lol lol

 
working