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God please grant me the serenity to accept the things I can NOT change

  1. Wendi M profile image81
    Wendi Mposted 6 years ago

    I am having one of those weeks that are especially trying on a recovering addict.

    Just writing this has helped...a little bit anyway!

    1. Cagsil profile image59
      Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Be strong Wendi, I've always had faith in you to come out ahead. smile big_smile

      1. Wendi M profile image81
        Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks Cags!

        I did my best (to no avail) to try and get a good night's sleep last night...but I'll keep on trucking!

        1. Cagsil profile image59
          Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          You're welcome Wendi. If you need? Email me and maybe I can help, but am always and have been a good listener. smile

    2. profile image0
      Motown2Chitownposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You can see from your post that you've done the wisest thing you can - return to the very basics.  Acknowledging what you cannot change means making room for the courage to come flowing in to change what you can.  Be strong - lots of us will pull for you in any way we can! 

      smile

      1. Wendi M profile image81
        Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes Motown, I have my sister to thank for having the "Serenity Prayer" implanted in my brain.

        My only problem is remembering it when I need it most.

        1. profile image0
          Motown2Chitownposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          If you remember nothing else in the midst of the chaos, a simple cry for help is often enough!  Even if your higher power happens to be a group of other recovering folks - go to them and just say "Help!"  Most are quick to oblige.  Continuing to send all the best your way!

    3. Sunnyglitter profile image86
      Sunnyglitterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      :::hugs:::

      1. Wendi M profile image81
        Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Thank you.

    4. Shahid Bukhari profile image60
      Shahid Bukhariposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Wendi

      I wish you the best of Everything ...
      Because ... you are doing some good to yourself ...
      I pray, may God Help you overcome, what you now realize was a wrong thing.

      1. Wendi M profile image81
        Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Thank you for your kind words Shahid.

        1. Shahid Bukhari profile image60
          Shahid Bukhariposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          You are welcome ... and the good wishes go to your son too ... to admit ... is the first step, to realization, of a wrong.

          I pray, may all your kids find a role model to follow ...in you !

  2. shogan profile image87
    shoganposted 6 years ago

    Hang in there, Wendi.  It always feels like it's almost too much just before it gets better.  smile

  3. Wendi M profile image81
    Wendi Mposted 6 years ago

    Thank you Shogan. 

    Unfortunately this one might be a little bit of a ride.  Now, I'm trying to get my 22 yr old son the help he needs with his "newly admitted" addiction.

  4. Mighty Mom profile image91
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Oh Wendi,
    I am so sorry.
    I can so relate to where you are. Been there, only my son was a young teen when I had to get him help.
    It's a lot harder to deal with a child's addiction than our own.
    There are my of "us" here on HP and we are here to share our experience, strength and hope whenever you need it.
    You will get through this.
    AND you don't have to drink or use over it!!
    Hugs and serenity coming your way,
    MM

    1. Wendi M profile image81
      Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you Mighty Mom, the support is much appreciated, as well as the hugs!

      I have no intention of drinking, I just wish I could get through the anxiety.

  5. RedElf profile image86
    RedElfposted 6 years ago

    Hang in there, Wendi!

    1. Eve Foss profile image83
      Eve Fossposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      A friend reminds me of two things on a regular basis. First, this, too, shall pass. Second, acceptance is the key to serenity. Hang in there.
      There should be a "Friends of Bill W." forum! :-)

    2. Wendi M profile image81
      Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you RedElf and Eve.

      And yes, I have many "Friends of Bill W!"  A good portion of them are members of my family...now (unfortunately) I can add one more family member to that list.

  6. Woman Of Courage profile image61
    Woman Of Courageposted 6 years ago

    Hi Wendi, You can make it. Hang in there. There is nothing impossible with God. smile

  7. mega1 profile image79
    mega1posted 6 years ago

    yes - f*ck em if they can't take a joke - it does get easier after especially when you finally just let it go - the world is going to be what it is - baby steps, pal, baby steps and lots of pats on the back!

    remember to live as well as you can!  Many of us here are struggling like you and believe in ourselves and you to be able to make life good and meaningful!  You have the strength, so all you have to do is USE the strength!

    1. Wendi M profile image81
      Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks Woman of Courage and mega1.  Just reading everyone's kind words of encouragement is extremely helpful.

      1. Woman Of Courage profile image61
        Woman Of Courageposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        You are more than welcome. I love the title of this thread. big_smile

        1. Wendi M profile image81
          Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          It's something I have to repeat (in my head) over, and over, again...eventually I might actually GET it!

  8. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 6 years ago

    There is nothing you cannot change if you are still alive.Courage and determination and belief in yourself and better things. You can do it if you tell yourself that you can.

    1. Wendi M profile image81
      Wendi Mposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I believe that for myself, but I need him to accept his problem (fully) before I can help him.

      1. profile image0
        Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Show a good example, show that you believe in him too, show support and patience, these things need time. Your son will need your support at least moral one for the rest of his or your life. I know how hard it is, but you do not have a choice, you are his mother.

  9. Mighty Mom profile image91
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Some really good advice here.
    It sounds counterintuitive, I know, but the best help you can be to your son right now is to NOT rush in to help him. This is the perfect time to want to regain control and direct the show. But we can't. Or we can, but you already know that the outcome will not be good until your son accepts his problem and ASKS for help.
    That's where we, as mothers, try to step in. WE see the problem and want to rescue. We know what's ahead and our maternal instinct is to not want our kids to go down as far as we know is possible.

    Things that have helped me:
    1. TURN IT OVER. I can't, He can, I think I'll let Him. God has a path for your son. It may not be the path you would choose. But trust in your God/HP and know that like He's got you covered, He's got your son covered, too.
    2. You cannot change some parts of this, but you can change some things. Do the next right thing. What is that? I don't know, but if you think about it and ask for guidance (God, other people's) it will be revealed to you.
    3. Is he a danger to himself or others? If so, that puts the situation into a whole different level of urgency. Or, is a family intervention appropriate (you say you have a lot of family members in recovery).
    4. Although we, as the mothers, feel our children's pain most deeply, we may not be the right person to 12-step our kids. The reasons why are obvious. A wife is probably the last person who can make her husband stop drinking. But I bet there's a man in your sobriety circle who could get through to your son. Someone whose life experiences are similar or someone with similar interests (bodybuilding, music, cycling -- whatever it may be). I've known quite a few moms who have called in sober male reinforcements. And had good results.

    Anyway, I could go on all day. I'm pretty passionate about this subject (and very grateful my son lived to see 18 -- I honestly didn't think he'd make it).
    Please feel free to contact me privately if you want to talk sister-to-sister.

    Big hugs. And as my sponsor always tells me, "It's already alright." Sometimes I want to smack her. But she's right!

  10. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 6 years ago

    If you have children, you HAVE NO RIGHT to be weak, mean, thoughtless or drunk. You are his beacon in life, his example, his strength. You have to be clean and bright and clever and smart and beautiful - for him. He has to have faith in life through you. It took me 4 years to convince my son that I am here for him, when he finally understood, - he changed, changed for the better, changed in a way I despared even to hope he could. Life is full of miracles, but we have to work on them to happen.

  11. PaulaHenry1 profile image70
    PaulaHenry1posted 6 years ago

    "It's already alright." Thats the best and most encouraging three words I have ever read...

  12. Karanda profile image85
    Karandaposted 6 years ago

    All of us step into life's journey in our own way. As much as you have stepped your own path, your son will do the same. Do what you need to do to look after yourself but be there for him without trying to walk for him.

 
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