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Adult ADHD

  1. sasanqua profile image88
    sasanquaposted 5 years ago

    I'm interested to hear from people who have ADHD, or know someone who has it (specifically adults). How does it affect you? Any helpful tips or advice on how to either live with it yourself, or live with someone who has it?

    1. couturepopcafe profile image61
      couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Diet had a tremendous impact on my behaviour.  I cut out all refined sugars, all refined grains, stopped drinking coffee, learned to meditate, learned (am still working on) to finish one project before going on to another.  (Multitasking is easy for ADHDs but not necessarily recommended)  Also started acupuncture to clean up meridian blockages, started reading about the functions of neurotransmitters in the brain, started doing (eating) what was necessary to enhance those neurotransmitters.

      Sometimes, I'm still a little mean, especially on HP because there's little backlash but I end up hurting myself when I am.  Translate mean as quick to answer/judge without giving someone the benefit of the doubt or taking time to really 'hear' them.

      1. sasanqua profile image88
        sasanquaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Oh wow, good on you! You sound so motivated! That's my biggest trouble...motivation. I know all the things I can be doing to help myself but I just never seem to "get around to it."

        1. couturepopcafe profile image61
          couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          No, I have a real problem with motivation.  I spent the better part of 60 years with this issue.  One day I just decided to start making small decisive changes and the years added up.  I have a problem even getting out of bed every day if I don't have to go to work.  When I was younger, it was actually easier because there was always something to do even if I felt out of place doing it.  Many ADDs are overly sensitive and tend to distort even the smallest incidents.  I spend a lot of time alone because its just easier to like myself that way.  I don't have to justify who I am and I have learned to love myself that way.

  2. Disturbia profile image60
    Disturbiaposted 5 years ago

    I have ADHD and so do both of my daughters. 

    For me, impulsivity seems to be the biggest frustration.  I am constantly interrupting conversations, talking over people, and often speak or act long before my brain has had a chance to process what I’m saying or doing,  and without any thought to the possible consequences.

    Although,  I have had a life time to develop coping skills to help me focus and keep organized, I can’t seem to control my fidgeting which may or may not actually have anything to do with my ADHD.  I’m just a ball of nervous energy and my body is in constant motion.  I sway when I stand, rock when I sit, tap my fingers, twirl my hair, and bounce my legs.  I have done this all my life… it’s probably why I’ve never had a problem with my weight.  My kids say I burn more calories watching TV then most people do at the gym.

    I refuse to take medication, which is a personal choice, but I am in no way against it and I believe it’s an effective tool in the treatment of ADHD. My one daughter takes Strattera and the other Adderall.  Of course, my core belief is that there is no need to treat those of us with ADHD because there really isn’t anything wrong with us.  But that’s another subject and I won’t go there at this time.  All I can say is thank God for post-its,  smart phones, and modern technology.  My house is covered with sticky note reminders and I have a gigantic calendar on my kitchen wall which we all check every morning.  My world is full of schedules, routine, and structure, which I personally dislike, but with two daughters, a grandson, and my own business, I find the structure and routine just make life easier.  My friends all think I’m the most organized person they have ever met, but that’s just me trying not to lose my keys again, or forget to feed the dogs again, or miss an important appointment with a client again, or forget to pick up my grandson from day care again.   If you read any of my hubs that are not poetry you will find I refer constantly to my ADHD because it frequently makes me go off topic and ramble on in all different directions, so more often than not, the hub might not even be about whatever the subject might have been. 

    I was married for several years to a man who had ADHD, and the house was in constant chaos the whole time.  His mood swings, impulsivity, and inability to control his behaviors disrupted the carefully balanced environment I had created for myself and my children. So I found myself with no other choice than to send him packing.

    1. sasanqua profile image88
      sasanquaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks for sharing your story. I can barely survive living on my own, let alone having two daughters with ADHD to look after! My ADHD affects my hubbing too. I have great ideas and start hubs, but then I get distracted and never finish them off. I'm off to read some of your hubs now...

      1. couturepopcafe profile image61
        couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        We tend to overwhelm ourselves with all of our creative ideas.  One thing I do is learn a lot.  It keeps me busy and prevents me from actually having to produce anything myself.  Distractions are the ADDs perfect excuse for never moving forward.  Don't spend your life like this.  Make short lists, not long ones.

 
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