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I have no medical insurance, what can I do?

  1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
    Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago

    I am compelled to write this post as a result of a comment on one of my hubs and I would really like your help. A commenter who is ill has no medical insurance and is unable to see a doctor, what are her options.

    I am in the UK and find it hard to believe that people who have no medical insurance simply can't get treatment, surely this can't be right there must be a way of finding treatment. I am actually quite appalled that this is the case in a civilised country such as America.

    Can somebody please help me understand how the system works and what alternatives are available?

    Thank you

    Aiden

    1. Randy Godwin profile image93
      Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Since the country is divided by political lines we have no hope of everyone being covered by medical insurance.  We also pay twice as much as other countries for medicines made here because we cannot bargain with the drug companies like other countries do. 

      The fact of drug companies paying lobbyists over a million dollars a day to try and prevent the healthcare bill from being passed should tell you it's all about the money and not about having healthcare for the citizens of the US.

      We are not entitled to having affordable health care if it means big business will not make billions in the process.  Understand now?  Greed is the underlying reason we haven't already joined the civilized countries of the world in the quest to have affordable medical care for our adults and children.  Sad in the extreme as you've found out from your friend who suffers from, not only a bad medical condition, but from the excess greed of our capitalist system.  It stinks to high heaven!!sad

                                                          http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

      1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
        Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks Randy I appreciate your reply.

        So is it simply a case of business profits before human rights or is it the cost to the Government due to the size of the population?

        What does somebody do if they have no insurance, surely they can't have no options? I have just found out about charity care but is that the only option?

        Sorry for so many questions.

        Aiden

      2. couturepopcafe profile image60
        couturepopcafeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I have no medical insurance and have no problem seeing doctors when I choose to. Not sure what's going on with your friend. There are plently of free clinics in the U.S. County hospitals will also take patients with no medical insurance, expecting to get paid by the patient.

    2. Naomi Rose Welty profile image73
      Naomi Rose Weltyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I don't know where the commentor lives, but here's how it works where I live (Savannah, Georgia): there is a free clinic in town. You take proof of identity and income to your first appointment, and then can get treatment for free or at low cost depending on your financial status. You might have to spend a few hours in the waiting room, but it does work.

      Alternatively, there is a hospital in town where you can go to the Emergency Room for treatment and, if you have no insurance and are on a low income, you can sign up as an "indigent." You get a card sort of like a membership and go see a doctor at the hospital whenever you are ill.

      The trick here is that if you have no insurance but are not considered "low income," it will be difficult to get care at affordable rates. However, I think most communities of any size have some sort of options like I've described, and some doctors will charge on a sliding scale. You have to ask. It requires some research; a good place to start is by looking for teaching hospitals. If your commentor has trouble finding information, a good resource is the library. That is, they should call or go into the library and ask for help. Librarians research questions like this every day. Another option is to contact the local government and ask about community resources.

      1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
        Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Brilliant response thank you, I hope Susie is able to make use of it.

        Thank you again

        Aiden

    3. teamrn profile image79
      teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      In America, each state must have an insurance plan for those who are unable to get insurance through their employer or who have a preexisting condition for which they cannot get insurance. So, yes, people who don't have means can get treatment. It's unfortunate that we haven't worked out the perfect system yet, and that among developed nations, the US spends more per capita on health care and ranks 37th in the world on delivery of that care and other countries spend a lot less of their GDP on healthcare.

      There are often free clinics in towns which offer essential services and the number of 'uninsured Americans at 50 million' is grossly inflated.

      That said, my health history isn't good and I like knowing that if my doctor feels that I need that MRI 'yesterday,' it will be done NOW. Not in 4 months and with pulling teeth, but NOW. We are surrounded by medical miracles (cardiac and other innovative treatment) and that comes at a price. Quite frankly, I'd rather have that available to me.

      In the UK and Canada and a host of other countries, health care, isn't so free. Taxes pay for it; is that why prices at the pump are between $7-10/gallon? 

      I agree with the writer below who said that our system is not good, but converting it to a single payer system like Obama wants to do, isn't going to help. Instead of cramming a square peg into a round hole like Obamacare wants to do, since all Americans know the system is broken, we should put our minds together and come up with our own kind of solution; not one that is crammed down our throats.

      1. couturepopcafe profile image60
        couturepopcafeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Not all state residents are eligible for state insurance.

        How about federal insurance for catastrophic illness and we take care of the rest on our own? Pay your own bills? That's a novel idea.

        1. teamrn profile image79
          teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          What is an example? We have to go off COBRA next month and my husband is high-risk, or pre=-existing condition, but a plan, "Cover  Colorado" will take him?

          What state plan doesn't take someone?

    4. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image59
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      In the U.S. there are several options. The person could apply for Medical Assistance under Medicaid. They could also look for a "free clinic" that offers services on a sliding scale, according to one's income. Emergency situations must be treated under the law, so anyone going to an emergency room must be treated before being released. Some pharmaceutical companies also offer prescription drug assistance so the individual could ask about these options at a pharmacy, physician's office or other. They could also do a search online for themselves to find out what kinds of programs are available to the low income or uninsured in their particular state of residence.

    5. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
      Jesus was a hippyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I'm guessing that there are private doctors over there? Maybe she could spend the money she saved from not buying health insurance and not paying towards health care in her taxes?

      It can't be that expensive.

    6. larakern profile image79
      larakernposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Honestly, it depends on the commentor's age, what state they are from, and their level of income. After my father was in an accident he was able to get Medicaid which pays for only a portion of the bills but it is a lot less than what it would have been. Also, there are programs and special aids that hospitals provide as well. There seems to be a lot of red tape to cut through but once you have completed their obstacle course of forms and verifying there are a lot of options available.

  2. Aiden Roberts profile image86
    Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago

    What is charity care?

    Can anybody access it?

    How do you pay for health insurance in North America, is it deducted from your salary?

    What happens if you can't work?

    Please help me understand how it works?

    Thank you

    Aiden

    1. Randy Godwin profile image93
      Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Insurance may be paid for through one's employers but other than that one must have a private policy which is extremely expensive for most.  And even then you must make co-payments on both doctor and hospital visits, as well as, on medicine prescriptions on top of the insurance premiums.  Even if one has insurance they may not be able to afford to go to the doctor or buy the required medicine.

      There is such a thing as charity care but one has to be almost penniless to qualify and even then the treatment is limited.  Many die because of this sorry state of affairs, but because of the conservative views in this country there is no hope for change anytime soon.

      I have glaucoma and despite having good insurance--my wife worked for the state of Georgia before retiring-- I still have to spend over $125 a month for 2 different types of eye drops which I could at one time buy from Canada for less money without having any insurance at all.  So technically, the exorbitant insurance premiums we pay were for naught until buying drugs from out of the country became a no-no.  You can guess who didn't like the former ability to buy cheaper drugs from other countries.

                                                         http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

      1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
        Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        This sounds like a very strange system, you pay insurance, you pay for visits and then you pay for prescriptions. I suppose the obvious question is: What does the insurance actually cover you for?

        So if you are rich you are covered, if you are destitute you may get some assistance but very little and if you are one of the masses you are basically on your own.

        Looking from across the pond it is not impossible to envy the American Dream, however I am shocked that this is going on as we are not talking about a third world country here. In the past I haven't paid much attention to your countries politics but purely from a humanitarian point of view I think I should.

        How have they managed to stop medicines being ordered on the internet seen as we live in a global economy?

        Aiden

        1. couturepopcafe profile image60
          couturepopcafeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Aiden - Now you've hit it. The rich get richer and the poor get aid. The middle class just gets suckered. We don't live in a dictatorship but Congress has a way of making laws that don't apply to them.

    2. AEvans profile image69
      AEvansposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      We don't call it Charity care. When people cannot afford insurance and they are not insured each individual states can determine if a person is entitled to there healthcare the state offers.

      Many companies in the United States offer healthcare plans and we are able to choose a specific plan and it costs an "X" amount of dollars out of our paychecks. They are designed for individual and family but many are expensive. You can either choose a healthcare plan because or decline it when offered at work. If you decline it, you had better not get sick because you can be forever be buried with medical bills.

      We should be like other Countries and provide care for everyone; but just like Randy said its all about our Almighty dollar.

      I don't mind supporting those who are on state healthcare especially our children, elderly and those who are on SSI or SSD ; but those who ride the system and honestly do not try to improve there quality of life, well that's a different story.

      If you lose your job they can offer a supplemental called "Cobra" which is even more expensive then regular healthcare. Our Country will nickel and dime us like they always do.

      So the U.S. is not all that its supposed to be and our Country is not always for the people; but if we voted all of the children out then maybe just maybe things would change.

      As for Obama he honestly was trying to clean-up a big mess that was dumped into his lap. Be thankful you are in the UK. smile

  3. TamCor profile image79
    TamCorposted 4 years ago

    Aiden--There is another hitch in the employee insurance plans...most companies that I'm aware of only pay for part of your coverage--you have to make up the difference each week, which for some, is un-affordable.

    And as far as insurance through the welfare department(charity care), well, that isn't always guaranteed, either.  If you have no children under a certain age, and you're not old enough for Medicare, you are out of luck--you won't get any kind of help with medical bills through them.

    That's possibly what the person commenting on your hub is dealing with.

    And also, many doctors won't take on patients if they don't have insurance...

    It's really terrible, the state this country is in, concerning healthcare.

    1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
      Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks TamCor

      So am I right in thinking that there is a safety net for people who simply can't afford healthcare but it is limited to certain groups and if this is the case then is the healthcare available to the whole group or elements within the group eg: you mention children under a certain age, if you have children under a certain age would that entitle the whole family unit to free treatment or just the children? Are children not generally entitled to free medical treatment regardless of parents status?

      You also mentioned medicare, is this for elderly people if so all elderly people or again is it selective?

      Thanks for your assistance.

      Aiden

      1. TamCor profile image79
        TamCorposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I should clarify, first, that each state may differ--I'm going by the state that I live in, which is Ohio. smile

        I am not familiar with all of the rules, sorry, so maybe someone else can help you more with some of your questions.

        I believe, though, that all senior citizens qualify for Medicare, once they hit a certain age.  Most, though, get another kind of coverage, too, to cover what all Medicare won't cover--my mother does this, I know.

        As far as the family, I think that it's only for the kids, unless the mother is pregnant.  When my son-in-law lost his job when my daughter was pregnant, the state covered her up to the birth of their child, and for about six weeks after, if I remember right.

        When my husband lost his job(he and our son-in-law worked at the same place), we couldn't get any type of insurance from the state.

        There are probably exceptions to the rules, such as disabled people, but I just don't know much about that part.  Hopefully someone with more knowledge can help you more...sorry!

        As far as I know--no, children aren't automatically covered for insurance, unless their parents income is low or non-existent...

        I've probably confused you more, lol.  This country is in such a mess, when it comes to healthcare...it's really scary.

        1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
          Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Hang on so it varies state to state, this get's worse.

          The money that USA spends around the world ( I am not going to get in to that) yet it's own citizens have a lottery when it comes to healthcare.

          I obviously have a lot of work to do if I want to understand this!

          Thanks

          Aiden

          1. couturepopcafe profile image60
            couturepopcafeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Amen. You said a f***ing mouthful. The citizens of this country are fed up with paying for the world when we need our own money. Once again, Congress is exempt.

  4. Gina Coole profile image85
    Gina Cooleposted 4 years ago

    I too live in the UK and sometimes complain about our National Health Service (NHS).  On reflection, my mother came out of hospital 2 days ago with a new knee.  She has already had a previous hip and knee replacement for no cost.  The hospital was about 2 miles from home and is virtually brand new. Everything was free (except visitor car parking) including food, drugs and all treatment.  It is actually cheaper to have a major operation in the UK than to stay at home. This service is available to everyone, even the homeless, yet in most of Europe we take this level of care for granted.

    1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
      Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Seconded

      The NHS reform has and will continue to meet stern opposition, we can not afford to follow other models of healthcare.

      Aiden

    2. profile image0
      SusieQ42posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Hi Aiden.  I am the unfortunate person with signs of RA.  No, I am not able to get help from social services for medicaid.  My kids are grown and my husband works full time.  We can't afford to have me covered on his insurance since I was laid off and lost my income.  His insurance alone is over $100.00 every 2 weeks.  He pays a $35.00 co pay for doctor visits and most medication is $7.00.  He has asthma with a breathing machine and other drugs to help him breathe.  Medicare is for those who are 65 and older.  The only other option for those who are my age (60 this year in Nov.) is private insurance (Cobra) which of course, we cannot afford.

      1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
        Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks for coming on here Susie.
        I know lots of people read these forums and hopefully someone more knowledgeable than I about the American healthcare system can offer some useful advice.

        I sincerely hope so.

        Aiden

    3. couturepopcafe profile image60
      couturepopcafeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Any of you Brits got a spare room? I'd give up my citizenship to become a British citizen. You people are so civil.

  5. Shelly McRae profile image84
    Shelly McRaeposted 4 years ago

    The American health care system is in a shambles and Obamacare isn't going to help matters any. The political BS aside, and without knowing the medical condition of the person in question, options may include clinics and subsidized medical facilities.

    There are clinics that operate on a sliding scale - you pay according to your level of income, and there are clinics subsidized by hospitals that treat people for non-life threatening conditions such as fever, flu, sprained ankle.

    If your friend has an ongoing, chronic condition that needs attention, he/she may qualify for assistance through disability programs or even social security. He needs to contact a local social services office.

    The options are few and he'll need to jump through beaurocratic hoops to get help, and even then he may not get the medical assistance needed. For the lower middle class and working poor, health care is a crap shoot.

    1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
      Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you Shelly

      I really appreciate your advice and hopefully there might be light at the end of the tunnel for Susie.

      Aiden

    2. Aiden Roberts profile image86
      Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Obamacare? Thanks more homework for me.

      1. profile image0
        SusieQ42posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Hopefully Obama will not be reelected in November.  My husband said I should go to one of the free clinics and I said, "they'll refer me to a specialist."  What do we do then?  We don't have the money.  If things get much worse I will go.  Right now I'm able to walk and write even through the pain.  I have faith in the Lord and I'm waiting for His go ahead.  God bless, Susieq42

        1. Shelly McRae profile image84
          Shelly McRaeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Hello Susie. You should go ahead and visit the free clinic. The physicians in these clinics often have connections to other doctors who work with patients that are financially challenged, so to speak. Funding at the federal, state and local levels is available; you just need to find the hidden keys to getting it. Go to the clinic. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain with just one visit.

          1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
            Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks Shelly that sounds like good advice.

            Aiden

            1. profile image0
              SusieQ42posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Yes, I talked to my husband and he said the same thing.  The pain is manageable when I take Ibuprofen but without it I have pain in both of my knees and right shoulder, wrist and fingers.  My right side seems to be bothered more than my left.  My collar bone and jaw (right) both ache.

  6. writersden profile image60
    writersdenposted 4 years ago

    You really can't do anything if you dont have medical insurance. smile

  7. leahlefler profile image97
    leahleflerposted 4 years ago

    Healthcare in America is extremely expensive. We are struggling financially due to my son's healthcare costs. We HAVE medical insurance, but my son has several medical conditions and requires care under several specialists. Every visit to a specialist is $40, every visit to the ER is $250. That's pretty cheap, but consider what insurance WON'T pay for:

    Hearing aids, for children. They don't pay a dime - hearing aids cost approximately $6,000 and have to be replaced every 4-5 years in children. Earmolds are $120 per set, and have to be replaced as the child grows (when my son was an infant, this was every 3 weeks). He requires an FM system, and thankfully the school district paid for that. Of course, that is through an unfunded mandate, so the school isn't given money to pay for the requirements of its special needs students!

    G-tubes. My son had surgery in April (a Nissen Fundoplication with g-tube placement). The g-tube was placed primarily for venting, as he cannot burp anymore and uses a C-Pap machine to breathe at night, which forces air down into his stomach. Insurance will ONLY pay for the g-tube if its primary purpose is feeding. We are buying his g-tube supplies out of pocket, at a price of $350 per set from a home healthcare company (HHC). The hospital is able to buy the same sets for $80, but we can't get those rates because our sole option is to go through the HHC, which operates at a profit. We are looking through the Oley Foundation, which is a list of people who have extra/used g-tube equipment who are willing to send the materials to people in the USA for the cost of shipping.

    C-Pap machines: my son uses a machine to keep his airways open at night, because he was born with a floppy airway. Without this machine, he desaturates (oxygen reduces in his blood) and he turns blue. This is considered "durable medical equipment" and insurance won't pay for it. We pay out of pocket, on a monthly installment plan, for the machine. The masks were $300 each from the Home Healthcare Company, but I did manage to get one online for $190.

    Medication: My son has ridiculously severe reflux. Several pH impedance probe studies have shown that medication will not control his reflux, but one medication helps better than the others. He takes Nexium, because it is the only medication that has been shown to help him at all. The insurance company doesn't like Nexium because it is expensive, so they routinely deny him his medication and we have to go through review. Because they denied him his medication the month after his airway surgery, the acid caused his airway to swell and collapse again. The cost of Nexium is $1400 per month, which is quite expensive out of pocket. When the insurance company approves it, it only costs us $40 per month (and another $10 for Zantac, a medication the insurance company never denies).

    It is frustrating and scary for parents of children born with life-long, chronic conditions. If you aren't below the poverty line, you don't qualify for help. If your child doesn't meet very narrow parameters for disability, you can't qualify for help there, either. Prior to the healthcare reforms under Obama, there was a lifetime spending cap for people on insurance plans. My son would have met that limit very quickly, and then insurance would have paid for NOTHING with regard to his care. Pre-existing conditions can make a person ineligible for healthcare insurance, which is a particular problem for children who have congenital medical problems.

    1. Aiden Roberts profile image86
      Aiden Robertsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Wow my heart goes out to you. Ironically here in the UK whatever we need from a medical point of view is free yet we still complain. Historically people who took out private medical insurance were seen as queue jumpers and frowned upon. I had no idea it was so bad in America yet I still find it difficult to comprehend why this is the state of affairs in such an advanced country.

      Good luck to you and your son.

      Aiden

      1. Sherry Hewins profile image97
        Sherry Hewinsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I'm curious as to how the system in the UK is paid for. Do you have extremely high taxes to enable all your citizens to have medical coverage?

        1. John Holden profile image58
          John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          No, in fact we spend less on healthcare than the US, about 9% of GDP as opposed to 16% of US GDP.
          Because everybody who is working pays into the scheme it works out quite cheap although there is a move to emulate your system in the UK.

        2. Hollie Thomas profile image60
          Hollie Thomasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          All citizens who are working, pay national insurance contributions directly from our salaries, whether employed or self employed, towards healthcare for all, and quite separately from taxes . It's actually a great system, however, the private healthcare companies do not agree, they haven't profited enough from the suffering of others; enter the revamp of the NHS.

      2. Hollie Thomas profile image60
        Hollie Thomasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Actually Aiden, it is not free. We, and our parents, have paid National insurance contributions for our health care.

  8. Alternative Prime profile image85
    Alternative Primeposted 4 years ago

    In the long run, the only realistic remedy and or solution to keep costs down, and care above average to an acceptable level here in the U.S. is to re-affirm your support for "ObamaCare" AKA "The Patient Protection & Affordable Health Care Act of 2010" by voting for President Obama in the upcoming November election -

    The "ObamaCare Plan" is certainly not perfect, however, all legitimate and or credible impartial experts in the field agree it's the most prudent, reasonable, and economically viable option to build upon going forward - A first crucial step toward "Medicare for All" regardless of an individuals income, age, or any other discriminatory factor or practice - So healthcare will become less and less burdensome for all Americans as we progress forward - Unless of course you believe good, acceptable quality healthcare should be reserved for the select few who can easily afford it by using legitimate wealth, or otherwise attained -

    Your only alternative is the Mutt Romney / Paul Ryan Plan (Republican Scam) which is essentially the equivalent of stripping all rights and privileges from the 99% of Americans and their respective physicians who need care the most, and replacing it with the insane GOP idea of giving all inherent powers to administer said services and or medications to those who deserve it least, namely "For Profit" Insurance Companies -

    Now there's a comforting thought wouldn't you say? Romney, Ryan, et al Republicans will immediately hand the unconditional reigns of power over to insurance companies who are in business for one solitary reason, to make a PROFIT and nothing else - They will dictate your health care if Romney becomes President -

    Shareholders with monetary interest will have complete control over who gives your care, when you can receive care, where you can receive care, how much your policy will cost, how much your co-pay will be, and how much in vouchers you will be required to purchase above and beyond all other health related financial obligations -

    This is one of the main reasons why senior citizens in states like Florida are organizing to stave off shallow minded scam artists like Romney who wish to strike down and strip away the most popular and successful Fed programs like Medicare from the 99% of Americans - Income of which senior citizens have earned, and have relied on for decades -

    P.S. Don't fall for the old & tired Republican talking points about SS & Medicare going broke soon, even if absolutely nothing was done to tweak the system, both are solvent for at least another 20 to 25 years -

    1. teamrn profile image79
      teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Nicely written and stated, but not much fact; opinion, yes, but not fact.

      1. Alternative Prime profile image85
        Alternative Primeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I really don't have time to explain my previous comment in specific detail, those who are informed understand the truth and your simplistic response seems to be typical of a certain Romney style cheerleader - It's now expected -

        When the facts as I've stated don't necessarily agree with your values, which seem to be geared toward re-affirming your support to allow the wealthiest individuals an unimpeded continuation to suppress 99% of Americans in almost every way, you simply pretend you cannot hear, read, or just ignore them - Only to wake up each and every morning to find reality greeting you once again -

        When is the last time a corporation, in which Romney claims is a person of tangible essence just like you and I, placed the general public's welfare as top priority, above making a profit for shareholders? Believe me, from experience, there are indeed a select few companies with high moral standards & values but it really doesn't happen that often -

        One thing is for certain, if a shallow minded tax evader like Romney happens to win the Presidency, unless another major flip flop is in order, Board Members & Shareholders will indeed indirectly control your Health Care and thus your Health - And that's just one of many facts I've previously articulated -

        If you do indeed end up voting for Romney, I sincerely hope you are wealthy enough to absorb the exorbitant Health Care costs associated with his outrageous policies -

        1. teamrn profile image79
          teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          "When the facts as I've stated " What are the FACTS that you've stated? My post wasn't made lightly; I really took away only OPINIONS.

          OPINION:"he only realistic remedy and or solution to keep costs down, and care above average to an acceptable level here in the U.S. is to re-affirm your support for "ObamaCare" AKA "The Patient Protection & Affordable Health Care Act "

          OPINION AGAIN: "all legitimate and or credible impartial experts in the field agree it's the most prudent, reasonable, and economically viable option to build upon going forward "

          I beg your pardon, a bit of FACT: "The "ObamaCare Plan" is certainly not perfect, however"

          MEAN SPIRITED:"Unless of course you believe good, acceptable quality healthcare should be reserved for the select few who can easily afford it by using legitimate wealth, or otherwise attained -

          "WHERE'S THE FACT?: "Your only alternative is the Mutt Romney / Paul Ryan Plan (Republican Scam) which is essentially the equivalent of stripping all rights and privileges from the 99% of Americans and their respective physicians who need care the most, and replacing it with the insane GOP idea of giving all inherent powers to administer said services and or medications to those who deserve it least, namely "For Profit" Insurance Companies "
          "
          THIS IS IN THE CURRENT PPAHCA: "Shareholders with monetary interest will have complete control over who gives your "
          OPINION: "shallow minded scam artists"

          AGAIN, OPINION: "Don't fall for the old & tired Republican talking points about SS & Medicare going broke soon"

  9. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    Those without insurance can go to emergency rooms which mean their care is effectively covered by those who do have insurance.

    Which is why I find it hard to understand the resistance to mandatory coverage. Those who sign up, pay. So it seems only logical to sign everyone up.

    1. couturepopcafe profile image60
      couturepopcafeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      If I have to pay for medical insurance, I want it to cover everything I deem necessary, not just selective bits. Those without medical coverage can go to any emergency room and get a bill when their done. I've never had coverage, have been to emergency rooms and doctors, paid out of pocket and still come out way ahead of what I would have paid if I'd been paying into medical coverage all these years.

      Don't force me to pay for something. End of story. If Congress wants to give everyone free coverage, great. But I'm not paying for substandard, limited coverage against my will.

      1. Alternative Prime profile image85
        Alternative Primeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        That's sounds exactly like something Mitt & Ann Romney would say - "Yeah, when you get sick, just do what Couture and everyone else in the civilized universe does, go to the hospital and pay out of pocket for that $100,000 spleen removal and be done with it" - Furthermore, yank the bills one by one out of your kick and pay cash, no check, believe me, it will cost less in the end and you'll feel so much better too - Come on CPC, I think you're better than that -

        Hey, all you Dead Beat Romney haters! Get off your lazy rear ends, go create a business with your parents $250,000 loan money, then pay cash for your health treatment with the profits earned and go buy a few  $1000 tee shirts with the rest! -

        And why stop there? Why stop with your objections and or refusal to adhere to or comply with Health Care for All policy CPC?

        What else do you not wish to be forced to do? Are there any other laws, statutes, policy designed for the greater good of the community or nation you take issue with? Why do I get the feeling there is at least a plethora of additional grievances in this category? -

        P.S. - In one way or another you're already paying a premium to compensate for those who do not have health insurance - In the long run, moving everyone under the Medicare umbrella is the only way to ensure adequate care for all and save you and everyone else money at the same time -

        1. teamrn profile image79
          teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          "But I'm not paying for substandard, limited coverage against my will." Which is exactly what will happen if we we accept Obamacare-as is. Up until now, health care has been anything but substandard; yet there are astronomically high costs and about 16 million uninsured.

          In making the move to cover all, we can ONLY deliver substandard care and raise taxes to pay for it. You can't insure more  people for less money. So, it only stands to reason that to keep the same quality and insure more, we need to raise taxes.

          That's why the GOP does not want Obamacare. Not because they don't want to insure the single mom with great cancer, who has 5 children and a dead=beat dadd, but because they know that the PRIVATE sector can do better than the government. That's a low blow below the waist to say that of Mitt and Ann Romney, like they were a bit to 'elite,' like they have the 'let them eat cake' mentality. That's the mentality of the nouveau riche and Michelle and Barack Obama fall into that category.

          Whatever the government touches breaks-why should a healthcare system be any different?

          1. Alternative Prime profile image85
            Alternative Primeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            If you honestly believe the "For Profit Private Sector" will do a better job providing and administering health care than the Federal Government has for decades via Medicare, I'm wasting my time here and wish you and your family well - Medicare needs to be shored up period, not dismantled for another re-distribution of wealth to the upper 1% - A totally unethical and possibly even illegal strategy of which Romney / Ryan are very familiar with and intend to pursue if elected -

            I would strongly recommend a crash study course in how a corporation operates in the real world, and if possible, you should sit in on a sleezy Insurance Company "Strategy Session" some time - Find out what they really think of you, the consumer / customer - If that doesn't enlighten you, I'm afraid nothing will -

            1. teamrn profile image79
              teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I'm not saying that the public sectors has all the answers right, AOK and 100% of the time. I'm just saying that government has a 0% track record of getting things right and honkey dorey. I KNOW what goes on in insurance companies. Good night!

  10. Alternative Prime profile image85
    Alternative Primeposted 4 years ago

    Exactly, a doctor has an ethical and possibly even legal obligation to treat anyone and everyone, including those who unfortunately do not have a health insurance policy - Even if treatment administered is done so for free -

    Well not exactly, it may be free of cost to the patient, but it is however eventually passed on to all Americans - The same is true of "Free Clinics", where you're lucky to get a doctor who graduated with honors from "ACME" to surgically remove that inflamed apendix, - Et Al "Free Services" -

    As more and more Americans fall off the Health Care rolls because of the affordability factor or other reasons, the higher everyone's overall tax burden becomes - And that's a fact - "ObamaCare" is the first critical step toward reversing the dire situation by covering ALL Americans regardless of income level, and not catering to just the wealthiest individuals -

    All American Citizens transferred onto one Government Run Health Care Program such as Medicare, like what the vast majority of Progressive Democrats are advocating and fighting so hard to secure, will ultimately save trillions in tax payer and private funds in the long run -

    1. couturepopcafe profile image60
      couturepopcafeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      IT DOESN'T COVER ALL AMERICANS! Only those who fall into the gap and they have to pay for it themselves! What's great about that? I can do that on my own.

      1. Alternative Prime profile image85
        Alternative Primeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        "ObamaCare" addresses the first critical steps toward filling the gap & covering "ALL" Americans as I've stated previously - Providing affordable policies to millions of additional citizens, as the Health Care Act does, is a substantial leap forward - What if you were an individual who needed coverage? -

        Without the additional protections contained within and afforded by  the "ObamaCare" law, aka  "The Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act of 2010" you may have serious flaws, loopholes, and exculpatory elements related to coverage within your current "Privately Held" policy (This Excludes Medicare) - "Corporate Profit Protections" if you will -

        If your current policy was issued by a private company outside of the Medicare Umbrella, right now, as we speak, a profit driven corporate entity is in control of your coverage and your health indirectly - The same greed driven "Wall Street" style "Churn & Burn" firms who were a major factor in ultimately driving this economy into a severe recession a few years back - Firms who are now desperately trying to get one of their own, shallow minded elected President to be "Distributor in Chief" - If your comfortable with this scenario, Up the power -

        One last question - Is a private or publicly held healthcare or insurance company more focused & concerned with delivering a handsome profit to owners / partners / shareholders, or, delivering the best quality care & services to customers? - Therein lies your answer -

        1. teamrn profile image79
          teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          "The same greed driven "Wall Street" " 

          So we exchange the private enterprise system for a GREED DRIVEN government system? I see a lot of shades of the GAO involved here.

          " Is a private or publicly held healthcare or insurance company more focused & concerned with delivering a handsome profit to owners / partners / shareholders, or, delivering the best quality care & services to customers? - Therein lies your answer -"

          The way I see it, the private sector has the benefit of competition; if you don't keep prices reasonable; you can't compete and as a business, you don't survive.

          However, with only one 'owner' (The US government), has no incentive to trim the fat and be competitive; who do they compete against? . I see THAT as your answer.

          See, there are TWO sides to every story...

          1. Alternative Prime profile image85
            Alternative Primeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            And how has all that so called "Competition" within the "Private Enterprise System" worked out for you over say the last 10 years? - We have more competition than we've ever had in all areas of the free and open market place yet everyone I know still confirms a consistent increase in overall monthly or annual expenses -

            Apparently, you're the one solitary beneficiary who has actually seen a decrease in how much you pay for goods & services over the span of the last decade? So we finally found that elusive sole beneficiary of magical, mystical, cure all "Competition"? -

            In reality, "Competition" accomplishes virtually nothing for you the consumer in the aggregate - It is however a nice little catch word Wall Street Corporate Execs like to toss around to hoodwink gullible individuals into thinking it implies a better deal for them, which it rarely does in the larger, overall scheme of things - But of course Romney and his pals evidently have no choice but to continue on the same "Path of Profit" for corporations at the expense of the general welfare of the 99% of Americans -

            Senior Citizens in states like Florida see right through Romney's greed driven intentions to dismantle Social Security & Medicare only to turn it over to your "Private Sector" - I just hope they make to the voting venues in November to express their outrage in a way that will count -

            1. teamrn profile image79
              teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              "And how has all that so called "Competition" within the "Private Enterprise System" worked out for you over say the last 10 years?" WHY LIMIT IT TO 10 YEARS, when prices have skyrocketed in the past 60 years.Why have costs skyrocketed? IMHO, we've researched and developed medical procedures and MAKE the cutting edge procedures. I don't want to give that up, which is precisely what we'll do under Obamacare. Why do you think people come here from other countries for medical care-because they like the drive? No, because they know they'll get the best. It may cost more, because we've not figured out a way to make it cost less. Lest we not forget, we provide care to well over 300,000,000, a lot more than Canada's over 30,000,000.

              "So we finally found that elusive sole beneficiary of magical, mystical, cure all "Competition"? -" I'm trying to talk, thought we could have an even exchange of ideas; please leave the glibness out of it.

              "In reality, "Competition" accomplishes virtually nothing for you the consumer in the aggregate -In reality, "Competition" accomplishes virtually nothing for you the consumer in the aggregate - Says who  besides you? Another liberal OPINION. The one thing I'm not: GULLIBLE

              Baby boomers are turning 65 in droves and those seniors are hot AGAINST our President who has done nothing for them. He's had 3+ years to shore up Medicare and robbed several hundred BILLION  from Medicare to fund Obamacare. There is also the cutting or eliminating completely Medicare Advantage plans, known as the infamous "Senior Swindle." What about the promise not to have to lose coverage, plans, change docs. When Medicare Advantage is taken from them, you KNOW seniors won't be happy. But you think seniors are his biggest cheering section. They're cutting and running from their fearless leader in droves after that medicare thing. AARP members were bought last election, but they know when they were deceived.

              Why has he not done a dang thing about Social Security-oh, that's right, there's no reason to, because it's very existence isn't in question. Why are the support guidelines SOOOO different from when SS was enacted in the 30s?

  11. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    Not every doctor is obliged to give treatment, only ER doctors.  So you will get only basic life-saving care.

    I think the easiest way to give basic health care is via tax, but the only other sensible option would be comprehensive insurance cover.

    1. Sherry Hewins profile image97
      Sherry Hewinsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I was just going to say, doctors are only required to save your life. If you have a chronic condition, like Susie's RA they are not required to treat you.

  12. seanorjohn profile image81
    seanorjohnposted 4 years ago

    It's crazy. The USA is so rich. Why don't they have a free healthcare system.

    1. teamrn profile image79
      teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      The US is not so rich. And no healthcare system is free.

  13. Melindas Mind profile image83
    Melindas Mindposted 4 years ago

    She needs to contact her local welfare office to see if there are any free clinics in the area. If she needs medications, but can't afford them, she can go to www.needymeds.com, where she can look her medication up, and get a list of people who will give it to her free or at a vastly reduced cost.

    1. profile image0
      SusieQ42posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I spoke with someone who has RA and all the doctors do is give them a prescription for pain medicine.  I can control the pain with something OTC and not spend thousands of dollars for xrays and blood work.  Yes, I am the person this forum is thinking of.  God bless  all of you!

      1. Melindas Mind profile image83
        Melindas Mindposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I have crohns disease - I can't get health insurance. My meds are upwards of 6,000 a month, and that isn't including pain meds. That's why I got on social security, so I can get medicare. Unfortunately, that took 3 years to take care of, and in the meantime I spent 11 days in the hospital, so I have tons of medical debt.

        That said, a low gluten diet would help with RA a lot.

      2. teamrn profile image79
        teamrnposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        So much more can be done for RA than pain meds; is she seeing a rheumatologist?

 
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