Why does the Mind/Body connection really matter?

Think and be well!

 

Worried about being worried sick?  Is laughter really the best medicine?  Your body may know you’re depressed before you do and doing it’s best to get your attention.  There is growing evidence, supported by research, indicating your mental state really influences your body’s ability to protect and heal itself!  In fact, your state of mind could be the best tool you have when defending yourself against illness and maximizing treatment of cancer, heart disease, digestive disorders, diabetes and aging.  All of your natural defenses are compromised in response to stress (primarily mental).

 

Most people have at least heard the term “psychosomatic” which quite literally means “mindbody”.  Unfortunately, this term was and is commonly misused when someone is thought to have imagined an illness and can then produce symptoms.  In confusion, we generally label and dismiss what could be more accurately described as “hypochondria” and have overlooked the power of the psychosomatic process itself.  As Woody Allen said “I’m not a hypochondriac, I’m an alarmist”.  Ironically, even this rather negative misunderstanding of psychosomatic also confirms the acceptance of the ability of ones mind to influence a physical condition.  Now, scientific research is validating that possibility: we could use the power of the mind (i.e., thinking) to create optimal conditions for becoming and remaining well.

 

What makes the mind/body perspective worth reconsidering at this juncture?  It is the transition which has been occurring, from the realm of “fuzzy logic”, “magical beliefs” and “spiritual eccentricity”, to the realm of solid measurable data.  Consider the placebo and nocebo effect.  What are the “placebo effect” and the “nocebo effect”?  In the simplest of terms, it’s the “sugar pill” effect.  It’s the uncanny result that is obtained from a substance, or sometimes a behavior, when none of the “treatment” properties are present to create the desired change, and yet, benefit is derived.  The nocebo effect accounts for adopting the “belief” that a substance (or change) won’t work, and, it doesn’t!  The placebo/nocebo effects are so powerful in fact, that all research conducted must allow for the possibility of these effects in their research data.  If science is nothing else, it is the domain of measurability, and its primary mantra is “if it cannot be measured, we cannot know it exists”, therefore, thoughts, emotions, feelings, mind and spirit had been relegated into the arena of unscientific observations.  Today however, we live in a world of electron microscopes, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and the previously immeasurable can now be measured, observed and replicated.

 

Mind/Body interaction had been observed and documented by Hans Selye in his work on stress as early as 1946 and the “General Adaptation Syndrome” became popularly known as the Fight-Flight-Freeze response.  Of special note regarding mind/body relevance, the stress experience creating the cascade of measurable physiological responses could be triggered consistently, regardless of the threat being real, imagined or perceived (through a mental interpretation) of danger. The body reacts to stimulus by activating the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis.  Researchers believe that prolonged exposure to stress (real or imagined) results in suppression of the immune system, wear and tear of several body systems, placing the individual at higher risk of dis-ease.  This was the advent of the earliest biofeedback strategies.

 

Pioneers in the field of mind/body research have expanded on Selye’s work. Researchers and practitioners have emerged from a broad array of disciplines, including cellular biology, neuroimmunology, psychotherapy and spirituality, representing the specific focus of their disciplines, be it mind or body.  The unifying premise of these disciplines is an acknowledgement of the fallacy or artificial separation of mind/body interaction.

These individuals have united under a variety of identifying umbrella labels usually incorporating the terms, “Holistic or Wholistic”, “Mind/Body” or “Complementary Alternative” Medicine.

 

So, with an acceptance of the inter-relatedness of the mind/body concept and the availability of sophisticated equipment, it has become possible to identify and measure methods to enhance mind/body interaction.  The implications for psychotherapy are obvious and substantiate the value of “talk therapy” as a viable treatment alternative for mental and physical health.  The mind/body perspective includes approaches of prevention that are proactive, health maintaining, healing, and driven by the individual.  Today, here at HEALTHePATH Associates http://www.healthepath.com rather than viewing the dis-ease “treatment” as a response, directed toward a passive recipient, we engage the whole person on a mind/body journey toward wellness.  Be well!!

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