Reduce Allergies by Removing Allergens Around the House

If you have allergies or asthma, there are several things you can do to reduce allergens in your home. Some suggestions are to replace carpeting with wood and tile floors, use easily washable curtains on windows, keep windows closed during pollen season, remove clutter and items that collect dust like ornaments, books and magazines, and empty kitchen trash daily. Dust contains most of the allergens in your home, so you should dust weekly. Clean bathtubs and showers every month to prevent mold build-up. And replace pillows regularly because dust mites can build up inside. These are some other things you can do to help reduce allergens in your house.

What Are Allergies?

Laundry

Clothing and bedding can contain allergy causing live dust mites. Mites can be transferred during the wash cycle to formerly mite-free items. According to one study 84% of mites were removed from clothing when washed with just detergent. Washing with detergent and bleach removes 98%. So, you should always wash clothing and bedding with both detergent and bleach. Use color-safe bleach for colors.

You can also get a special detergent designed to kill dust mites. Allergen Wash Laundry Detergent claims to remove:

dust mite allergens, pet dander, pollen, and mold from all fabrics without having to use water temperatures of 140 degrees or higher

Allergy-Proof Bedding

Allergy-proof bedding includes both mattress and pillow covers. Experts warn that these covers alone won't reduce allergy or asthma symptoms. The covers reduce exposure to dust mites but it's still important to wash bedding weekly, reduce clutter in the bedroom, and change air conditioner filters regularly to prevent dust build up. While allergy proof bedding isn't 100% effective, allergy specialist do recommend using them. Protecting your bed will usually cost between $40 and $80.

Cover mattresses and pillows with allergy covers and limit stuffed animals to reduce allergens in bedrooms
Cover mattresses and pillows with allergy covers and limit stuffed animals to reduce allergens in bedrooms

Avoid Air Fresheners

Air fresheners and scented candles can trigger allergy symptoms or worsen existing allergies. They can also trigger more severe asthma attacks. This is according to a study by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

"This is a much bigger problem than people realize. About 20 percent of the population and 34 percent of people with asthma report health problems from air fresheners. We know air freshener fragrances can trigger allergy symptoms, aggravate existing allergies and worsen asthma."

The Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) also says air fresheners can reduce lung function.

Febreze Allergen Reducers

Febreze has a line of allergen reducers that they claim "reduces up to 75% of inanimate allergens that become airborne from soft surfaces, such as pet dander and dust mite matter." These include air fresheners and fabric sprays for carpets, curtains, sofas and pet bedding.

HEPA Air Purifiers

Air purifiers remove dust, pollen, mold spores and other particles from indoor air. They can also reduce odors. There is still debate about whether they reduce allergy and asthma symptoms. Allergies caused by particles like dust mites that don't remain airborne can't be relieved by air purifiers. However, the Mayo Clinic recommends using one and suggests the following:

Try adjusting your air filter so that it directs clean air toward your head when you sleep.

Dust mites and their feces building up in spring mattresses
Dust mites and their feces building up in spring mattresses

Memory Foam or Latex Mattress

Dust mites, dust mite feces, dead skin cells and oil can build up inside coil and spring mattresses. This is why spring mattresses are thought to get heavier over time. According to one study, a used mattress may have 100,000 to 10 million mites inside. Mites can also build up in pillows. Memory foam mattresses may be better for allergy sufferers because while dust mites can live on the surface they can't burrow inside. However, Dr. Morris Nejat of New York Allergy & Sinus Centers says:

Encasing your mattress in a dust mite cover and washing your sheets once a week is enough to lower your exposure to dust mites.

Memory foam mattresses are made using chemicals, so it's unknown if they can have negative health effects. However, most mattresses are made using synthetic material, so that problem is not limited to memory foam.

Latex mattresses are another option. It's difficult for allergens like dust mites and pet dander to stay on these mattresses.

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Comments 6 comments

kerlund74 profile image

kerlund74 2 years ago from Sweden

I think it is a more and more common problem with allergies nowadays, especially when it comes to kids. Great suggestions in this hub.


Learn Things Web profile image

Learn Things Web 2 years ago from California Author

Thanks kerlund74. They definitely seem to be getting more common.


macteacher profile image

macteacher 2 years ago from New York

My allergies are flaring up again. I'm going to try that laundry detergent - very useful hub. Thanks!


Learn Things Web profile image

Learn Things Web 2 years ago from California Author

macteacher,

It's especially important to clean bedding properly.


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

I do suffer from allergies, so these are some things I have to check out. Thanks for the tips!


Learn Things Web profile image

Learn Things Web 2 years ago from California Author

You're welcome Mel.

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