Cord Blood: Should You Bank Your Newborn’s Cord Blood?

Blood that remains in the placenta and in the umbilical cord that is still attached to the placenta after childbirth is referred to as Umbilical cord blood. It contains stem cells that researchers believe will be useful in treating many diseases.

Kept under the right conditions, stem cells can be stored indefinitely. However, cord blood must be collected, processed and banked within minutes of birth. If you want to preserve your baby’s cord blood, arrangements should be made well in advance so that your doctor and delivery room staff will be prepared.

If either of a baby’s birth parents have a family history of diabetes, lupus, neurological or degenerative diseases, (and/or other autoimmune diseases) etc., it is probably worth the expense of collecting and storing your baby’s cord blood just in case your baby is genetically predisposed to developing one or more of these diseases.

Some people are choosing to have their newborn baby’s cord blood collected and stored in case it may be beneficial in treating genetic disorders or diseases such as leukemia or lymphoma their baby may develop later.

The stem cells in the umbilical cord blood are believed to have great potential for curing some heart related diseases, repairing some damage that results from heart attack, curing more than 60 different blood diseases, and some infectious lung diseases.

Recently NBC News has reported that scientists at UCLA are saying they have discovered a way to turn stem cells into cells that fight HIV, and that the genetically engineered cells have been successful in suppressing the virus in animals.

According to Wikipedia: “Researchers are noting several positive observations in pre-clinical animal studies. Thus far, in animal models of myocardial infarction [heart attack], cord blood stem cells have shown the ability to selectively migrate to injured cardiac tissue, improve vascular function and blood flow at the site of injury, and improve overall heart function.”

Source

Many Doctors Recommend Donating Your Baby’s Cord Blood To A Public Cord Blood Bank

More is now known about cord blood and its possibilities. Most pediatricians and other doctors recommend donating a baby’s cord blood to public cord blood banks because the cord blood usually contains the same genetic makeup that caused a baby’s genetic disease in the first place, so a physician would not use a baby’s own cord blood to treat their condition.

Banking a baby’s cord blood in a private cord blood bank might be useful if the baby has a sibling or parent who might benefit from the cord blood. In that case it might be worth the expense of paying for collection and storage of the cord blood in a private cord blood bank, which according to Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation, currently runs between $1500 and $2000 for the first year.

If the cord blood is donated to a public cord blood bank, there is no cost to parents for collection or storage. Should a family member need a transplant in the future, it is highly likely that a public cord blood bank would have a matching donor, because they already have so many people who have donated to the public cord blood bank.

More Answers To Your Questions About Donating Your Baby's Cord Blood

No Guarantees From Public or Private Cord Blood Banks

However, there is no guarantee that there will be a matching donor for your child in the event that his or her donation of cord blood was given to someone else, nor is there any guarantee that your child will have priority over the cord blood s/he donates. There will likely be a charge for the cord blood in the event it is ever needed.

These are all considerations to think about if a parent is trying to decide whether or not to collect and store their baby’s cord blood, or donate their baby’s cord blood to a public cord blood bank.

Also, it is important to determine as best possible, the chance that a private cord blood bank may go out of business. If that should happen, you could lose any benefit you may have had by storing your baby’s cord blood.

There are so many questions you should have and will have that you will want to be thinking about your different options well before the birth of your baby. For answers, I recommend Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation.

References

WebMD on the pros and cons of banking cordblood

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/features/banking-your-babys-cord-blood


Mayo Clinic on Saving Cord Blood

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cord-blood-banking/an01997


Parent’s Guide on Banking Cordblood

http://parentsguidecordblood.org/

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Comments 59 comments

Au fait profile image

Au fait 4 months ago from North Texas Author

Peggy W., thank you for sharing this article! Yes, there have been a lot of things discovered since I wrote this and I'm thinking of replacing it one of these days with a different subject entirely. :)


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 months ago from Houston, Texas

Sharing this important article again so that new mothers think of doing this. I recently heard on the news that there is some new research proving the value of using placentas for medicinal purposes. They can be donated instead of being discarded. Here is more information regarding that: http://www.placentadonation.com/amniotic-membrane-...


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Deborah-Diane for pinning this hub! Hospitals and doctors are asking new parents what they want to do about this because it's a big money maker for some cord blood banks. This is to help people understand what it's all about so that they can make a decision that works for them and their family.


Deborah-Diane profile image

Deborah-Diane 3 years ago from Orange County, California

Since one of our daughters and her husband just announced her pregnancy, I am pinning this to my parenting board. I thought they might find your article interesting. Her husband is a scientist, so he is likely to really be interested in the reasons for banking cord blood. Great article!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Peggy W for stopping back, reading, sharing your thoughts, and tweeting this article! Agree that comments can be as interesting and educational/helpful as a hub can itself be, so I like to read comments. They sometimes add new additional information and useful insights from commenter's experiences .

I agree that presenting the information so that people will have an idea of what it's all about is the most important thing. Then people can decide for themselves what they want for their family.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Reading the continuing comments is educational as well as reading the article you posted. Going to tweet this to get it further exposure. Everyone has to make up their own mind regarding this subject after discussing the pros and cons with their doctor.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you vespawoolf, for reading, sharing your thoughts, and for noticing that I do try to keep my opinion out of things, and I think most of the time I succeed -- most. ;) Thank you also for the vote and the share!


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 3 years ago from Peru, South America

This is an interesting and controversial subject. As all your Hubs, this is well-researched and you leave the decision up to the reader after presenting both sides of the issue. Voted up and shared.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Moonlake, for voting on, pinning/tweeting and sharing this hub with your followers. It seems that more and more expectant parents are being asked how they want to handle this subject.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America

An important article and I will share it with followers, pin, tweet and voted up. Lots of good information.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for your continued interest Wrylilt. Years ago everyone in my high school was put through a class on emergency medical procedures and one thing it covered was assisting a woman in childbirth who for whatever reason could not get to a medical facility in time. I do recall the instruction to wait for the blood to stop moving back and forth between the placenta and the baby before cutting the cord.


WryLilt profile image

WryLilt 3 years ago from Toowoomba, Australia

Thanks Au Fait,

Hopefully in a few more years, delayed cord clamping will be the norm again and they'll have better sources of stem cells!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for stopping back Wrylilt, but no need to apologize. This hub is usually idled so you have to hunt for it. No matter, it's gotten a lot of interest again lately so it's been taken out of idle again, but I'm sure it's temporary.

I understand that you want what's best for babies and you're trying to persuade people to that action, and that is certainly a worthwhile endeavor. No one can fault you for that.

Now that the cord blood industry is so commercialized I think it's harder for some people to figure out what to do. I read more about it because of your interest in this hub and things have changed a lot since I wrote it. I'm not sure this article is even relevant anymore and may just take it down. For sure it needs revision.

From everything I found in my recent research I would say banking cord blood has become nothing but a commercial money maker for some people/companies and that banking the cord blood is really a waste of money for most people because we've moved past that. Banking cord blood seems to already be obsolete, and as you have pointed out, delaying the clamping of the cord for the sake of baby's health is more important.

Appreciate that you brought me up to date.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for your continued interest in this article Shyron. The only negative, as I pointed out in a comment above, is that most people never use the cord blood and so it is a waste of money in that sense. There really isn't much blood to bank if the doctor delays the clamping of the cord, as s/he should do for the health and well being of the newborn, and already new technology is removing the need to bank cord blood.

If it were me, I wouldn't do it. I would say only if there are extenuating circumstances specifically discussed with one's doctor and that doctor advised cord blood banking, that I would even consider it. Technology is moving forward so quickly that I think banking cord blood is already old hat in many cases.


WryLilt profile image

WryLilt 3 years ago from Toowoomba, Australia

I'm sorry! I had to go back and find what you were talking about. I'm sorry if you thought they were related... I generally just jump on any cord blood hub/article/news story I find and add my thoughts as it's a subject I'm very passionate about.

... I just spend a lot of time stalking people's profiles out of interest on Hubpages. And this time I saw cord blood.

I also get in a lot of fights and arguments and disagreements on the forums, so please don't feel I have a personal vendetta!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Wrylilt, thank you for adding more useful information to this article. I'm sure my readers will have a better understanding of things if they read your comments. I always like to read the comments on a hub too, since useful information is often included in some of them.

There is information about delayed cord clamping all over the Net, and I think anyone who does much research on what is best for their baby will most probably choose that over saving the cord blood.

Given all that is known about saving the cord blood now compared to what was known only a few months ago when this article was written, I think I would agree that it is probably not worth the expense. If I were considering it today, I would likely reject it because the benefits are so minimal compared to the cost. I understand there is less than a 20% chance that it will ever be useful to the baby involved or any other family member.

There is no need to apologize Wrylilt. I got the impression that you were offended that I pointed out a way to make the idled hubs show up on the profile page. Not being indexed by Google, they will not likely get any major traffic, but so long as they're doing no harm, why not get all you can from them? If you have a place to move them then do it, but in the meantime, let them produce however much they can.

Another thing I have noted about idled hubs is that they are often indexed by Google for as long as 2-3 weeks after they have been idled. That would seem to be because Google has a schedule for re-indexing sites and articles, so if they've just done that prior to a hub being idled, then it will stay indexed until Google comes back around.

Depending on when a hub is idled compared to the last time it was indexed, it could be anywhere from a few hours, a few days, or 2-3 weeks that it remains indexed after being idled.

I have also noted that idled hubs sometimes remain listed in the description of a hubbers name on Google (wrylilt.hubpages.com), as well as the descriptions of any people who have pinned it on Pinterest.

Idled hubs that have been pinned or shared on FB or elsewhere will also get exposure that may get them enough traffic to get them out of Idle.

I've noticed a lot of people also use bad word choices for their titles. As a newbie I made that mistake a lot too, and now I try to choose the more boring titles that include words people are likely to use in their searches. Sometimes changing the title of a hub can turn it into a producer.

I know that you know most of these things already. Maybe someone who doesn't know will read this and learn something they didn't know.

Anyway, thank you for your input.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

Au fait, this should be a hub of the day.

I think you know that my grandson is studying to be a pediatrician, or did I not tell you? And my granddaughter had to interrupt her studies to have her own baby, she still needs to go for her Doctorate.

I am not an authority on the collection of cord blood, but I have read some about it, and I could not find anything negative. Did you find anything negative in your research?


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Author Cheryl for reading and commenting on this article. Appreciate your thoughts especially given that you work in medical services.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for stopping by Jen. Tell your daughter-in-law to discuss this issue with her doc and to ask him how beneficial he believes banking her newborn's blood might be. For some people it can make a difference, but for most people stats show it is never needed and so the cost of banking was not really worthwhile. Very often the stem cells are not helpful for the baby since they contain the same genetic material that caused any problems for the baby in the first place.


WryLilt profile image

WryLilt 3 years ago from Toowoomba, Australia

I'm very sorry Au Fait,

I shouldn't have oversimplified. I posted the graph as a very simplistic version of the level of blood in the placenta vs in the baby, in answer to Shyron's comment about blood being extracted from the placenta, not the cord. I also chose the image because it was not a self promotional link (I have a hub which goes into much more detail on 'delayed cord clamping' which I would have linked otherwise).

The act of removing cord (or placental) blood does not in itself hurt the baby ONCE the cord is cut. It is the act of clamping and cutting the cord itself which hurts the baby.

The baby receives a very important transfusion of blood from the placenta following birth. Delayed cord clamping and cord blood banking are almost mutually exclusive.

An average newborn baby has a blood level of approx 280mls. To bank the cord blood requires at least 45mls. IF the cord is left to pulsate and transfer the blood to the baby, there is barely a few mls left in the placenta, so it is near IMPOSSIBLE to get cord blood to bank.

The blood in the cord and placenta belongs to the baby and not receiving it can increase their risks, especially if premature or having breathing difficulties.

If you'd like to read further on it, I'd suggest checking out my hub, or an article called "Cord Blood Collection: confessions of a vampire-midwife" or the recent article in the New York Times entitled "Study Finds Benefits in Delaying Severing of Umbilical Cord".

I didn't mean this as a personal attack; I am however very passionate about this topic and am aware that cord blood banks give a lot of misinformation. There are many ways to get stem cells that don't impact on a baby's health and blood supply, including breastmilk and wisdom teeth for a start.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for your support Shyron. I have done a quick search to learn what harm comes to a baby as a result of harvesting the stem cells in the cord blood and I have found nothing at all.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Wrylilt, thank you for taking such a deep interest in this article. I personally have no horse in this race. My daughter is nearly 25 years old.

I did think some people might like to have some information about this issue, since many new parents-to-be here in the states are being asked by their doctors if they wish to bank their newborn's cord blood. Some have never even thought about it before and know very little about it.

Usually I list my references, but this hub was written before I started doing that. Since it is such a passion for you, I went ahead and added my references at the bottom of the hub, in case you or anyone else would like to check them.

Neither the Mayo Clinic or WebMD, or anyone I could find on the Net, credible or not, suggested there was any danger to a baby in the process of, or as a result, of harvesting the cord blood.

The biggest cons (as in pros and cons) of banking a baby's cord blood that were listed were unrealistic expectations of parents and expense. I stated in this article that many of the things that stem cells will hopefully benefit are now only hopeful possibilities. I leave it to people to decide for themselves what they want to do. I don't believe it is up to me to attempt to control their lives and decisions.

The URL you placed in your comment went to some sort of graph. There was no explanation. Please do not put URLs in your comments on my hubs. As HP says right under this comment box, "Comments are not for promoting your hubs or other sites." Scroll down and read it for yourself, don't accept my word on it.

As references I always use credible sites, people, and organizations, not just somebody who happened to write an article about something. I do not even share my own opinions on these things. Sometimes I will share an experience if it is relevant, but when it comes to the facts I generally stick to those references that are recognized in this country and around the world by informed people.

Thank you again for your interest in this article.


WryLilt profile image

WryLilt 3 years ago from Toowoomba, Australia

Shyron, the blood that goes to the baby doesn't magically appear in the cord. The cord is simply a way for the blood to get FROM the placenta TO the baby. Therefore, there will be very little blood LEFT in the placenta to withdraw, as the placental veins will be empty.

A very basic version of delayed cord clamping: http://midwifethinking.files.wordpress.com/2011/02...


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

WryLilt, not according to Wikipedi. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn.[3] Cord blood is collected because it contains stem cells, including hematopoietic cells, which can be used to treat hematopoietic and genetic disorders. One unit of cord blood generally lacks stem cells in a quantity sufficient to treat an adult patient. The placenta is a much better source of stem cells since it contains up to ten times more than cord blood.[4] Some placental blood may be returned to the neonatal circulation if the umbilical cord is not prematurely clamped.[5] According to Eileen K. Hutton, PhD, and Eman S. Hassan, MBBch, cord clamping should be delayed a minimum of two minutes to prevent anemia over the first three months of life and enriching iron stores and ferritin levels for as long as 6 months. (Ref. "Late vs Early Clamping of the Umbilical Cord in Full-term Neonates,"


WryLilt profile image

WryLilt 3 years ago from Toowoomba, Australia

Shyron, it DOES hurt the baby. Where does the blood come from? It's the baby's own blood supply.

For birth, a decent amount of the baby's blood is stored in the placenta so the baby can more easily fit down the birth canal. That blood is then designed to give a vital transfusion after birth, full of oxygen and iron.

Babies who have their cord cut immediately (premature cord clamping) instead of when the cord has gone limp and white (optimal cord clamping) often suffer from anemia, asthma and a whole range of issues based on how much blood was allowed into their bodies before it was rudely cut away.


Author Cheryl profile image

Author Cheryl 3 years ago

Very good article cord blood is an essential thing that is needed in case something happens to your child it has no impact on the baby because it is already cut away from the babies body. Why not give it up they just destroy it.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

I have been reading about this, since it would not hurt the baby, and if the baby ever got injured and needed blood, I would imagine it would be a lot less costly. Voted-up, useful, shared and pinned.


Jen 3 years ago

My son's wife is expecting and they have been asked by their doctor if they want to save their baby's cord blood. That was a question none of us had even thought about. I have read several of your articles and never even noticed you had written on cord blood before. How did I miss it? You have so many articles and enjoy them because I always learn something.

You know my grandchildren just love your chocolate chip pancakes and your pumpkin pie with no crust too. This article about cord blood is very helpful I think. It will give my son and daughter-in-law some information to help them decide what to do. With so much information online you never know what to believe or who can be trusted, but since we have been friends for such a long time I feel like you will steer us in the right direction. Thank you for writing this Au fait. I will tell my daughter-in-law about it.


WryLilt profile image

WryLilt 3 years ago from Toowoomba, Australia

I would never give my baby's blood away or store it, unless there was a reason she could not physically get it. I really think there is no need for cord blood banks - stem cells can be extracted from many other sources that don't harm a baby - such as breastmilk and wisdom teeth.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you DDE for reading and commenting on this hub and for your high praise. This is definitely a subject new parents to be need to learn about and consider.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Kasman, for reading, commenting, voting on, and sharing this hub both with your followers and on FB! Glad it has been helpful for you. :)


DDE profile image

DDE 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

A very interesting insight to saving a baby's cord blood, you have researched the topic thoroughly and focused on the pros and cons accurately.


Kasman profile image

Kasman 3 years ago from Bartlett, Tennessee

Very insightful article into a controversial subject. Well, maybe not so controversial anymore since the whole Stem cell conversation began.

My wife and I were recently asked this on a form at the doctor's office because of our impending little girl coming into the world. I honestly wasn't as informed as I would have liked to have been and now I'm glad I read this hub. Thanks for writing it Au fait. I think everyone wanting kids needs to read it. Voting up, sharing, face booking! Well written.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Deborah-Diane, thank you for reading, commenting, and pinning/tweeting this article. Very much appreciate you and your support!


Deborah-Diane profile image

Deborah-Diane 3 years ago from Orange County, California

I was fascinated by this article and came back to pin it to my "Medical Information" board. I also Tweeted it. I think others will be interested in knowing about this process, too.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you rajan jolly for reading and voting on this article, and for sharing your thoughts. Saving one's baby's cord blood could end up being a lifesaver once all the research is in.


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

Certainly a lot of food for thought here in this hub. Weighing the pros and cons before deciding where to store the baby's cord blood is really important it seems after reading this well researched, important topic.

Voted up and useful.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Peggy W for pinning this article!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for stopping by Shyron. The cord blood can be kept indefinitely since it is frozen. By putting it in a public cord blood bank instead of a private cord blood bank there are many other opportunities for it to help the owner or someone else.

A blood test can show if you have a predisposition for developing cancer. Ask your doc if that's something you want to know. You can be tested for other genetic diseases too.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

I wonder how many babies will need their cord blood, and how long it will be kept for them if they do. Maybe it could be used in research. Would it show the cancer gene?

Shyron


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you for reading/commenting Glenda. So far as I know anyone can vote whether a member of this site or not.

The Cord blood could be useful to any family member at some point in the future, one never knows, but by putting it into a public cord blood bank it is available to anyone who might need it who is also a match.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Nicole S, thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment. Hope this article helped you get a better understanding of this subject. :)


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Deborah-Diane for reading and commenting on this hub. There's no telling how useful a baby's own cord blood may be to them in future, so I think it is a good thing to bank it somewhere.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Au fait,

I'm starting a new board on Pinterest called Health related subjects and this will be the first pin to that board. Important topic!


Glenda 3 years ago

This is very, very interesting, have heard of this but when my baby was born, it did not come to mind. I don't know that it would have been useful then or ever.

Can I vote on your articles or do I have to be signed up on here?


Nicole S profile image

Nicole S 3 years ago from Minnesota

So I've heard of this but never really knew what exactly it was. Interesting!


Deborah-Diane profile image

Deborah-Diane 3 years ago from Orange County, California

We have a friend who paid to have her grandchildren's cord blood banked. I had never heard of this until she did it. It is a very interesting idea. Thanks for the article. Thumbs up!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Peggy W for reading, commenting, voting on, and sharing this article. I have also heard of women eating the placenta raw after giving birth. It is said to contain nutrients and hormones that passed back and forth between mom and baby during pregnancy. There isn't any scientific proof that a woman benefits from this feast.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Au fait,

Interesting and important topic. The potential for cures of the future could lie in the research being done from cord blood. Everyone should consider donating cord blood as a gift to humanity. It is a shame to discard such important potentially life giving remnants from giving birth. Many animals eat the placenta and cord. Is this instinct just to protect their newborns from predators, or is it that the mother gains added nutrition and perhaps more from consuming it? UUI votes and sharing.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you moonlake for reading, commenting, voting on, and especially for sharing this hub! Agree with what you write on this subject.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you rebeccamealey for reading and commenting on this hub! I, too, would save my daughter's cord blood if I had it to do over again, but it wasn't even discussed that I remember back then.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

This is very interesting, and yes, I think keeping cord blood is an excellent idea. I would do it if I had the chance to do it over.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America

Interesting hub. Voted up and shared. I think it is such a good idea for parents to bank core blood.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 4 years ago from North Texas Author

Thank you Toronto30 for adding additional information and for taking the time to comment. Very much appreciated!


Au fait profile image

Au fait 4 years ago from North Texas Author

Sacey McQ: Thank you for commenting and for adding information to the conversation!


Toronto30 4 years ago

Hey Shyron E Shenko,

cord blood banks are out there for a while now. There is also a new APP for iPhone users, called the Insception iPregnancy App. You should check it out. More can be found here: http://www.insception.com/app/pregnancychecklist.

It is very helpful and will hopefully make people more aware.


Sacey McQ. 4 years ago

Very nice article. A few things you may need to revise is that. One: Cost is much less then $1500 - $2000 for the first year. Many programs and payments options to lower that significantly and also the remaining years are close to 125.00 a year. Much less then one pays for a cell phone bill of $100 per month. Two, Companies that go out of business are bought up by larger companies and samples are then transferred to the new facility. Never a chance of losing your babies cord blood. And Three, We have yet to scratch the tip of the ice burg on what cord blood stem cells will be CURING, not treating, in the near future. Check out the clinical studies that are happening now.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 4 years ago from North Texas Author

It has been available for several years already, but you understand that most of the things scientists are 'hoping' cord blood (stem cells) will cure are still in the 'hoping' stage, yes? NBC reports that the next step in using stem cells to slow or cure HIV is now to the stage where human trials will begin and it will likely be another 10 years before any positive results will benefit people who have HIV. There's still a long way to go. Most of these possibilities are just that, possibilities. A lot of work must still be done before most of this will become more than a hope.

Thank you for your comments as always!


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 4 years ago

This is very interesting, should have been available years ago, could have saved lots of people from going through deseases that could have been prevented.

Great hub - Voting you up!

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