Walking at Night: Sleepwalking Symptoms, Facts and Misconceptions

Descriptions of sleepwalking


I was a small child lying in bed, drifting off toward sleep. The door to my room slowly opened, and I saw the silhouette of my sister in the doorway, her shadowy form illuminated from behind by a light in the hallway. I softly called her name but she did not respond. After standing there for a few seconds, she turned and walked away. The next morning my parents found her at the dining room table with her head resting on her arms. She was sound asleep……


On a cool night in October, a friend called and asked if I could pick him up at the train station. I asked where he was returning from—I never knew he had been away. To my shock and surprise, he hadn’t gone anywhere at all. His last memory was getting ready for bed. He apparently got out of bed, dressed himself and walked to the station; all while still asleep……


I finished dinner and settled in for an evening in front of the television. After channel-surfing for awhile, a found a basketball game that interested me. I drifted into a light sleep watching the game. Four hours later I awoke from my slumber. I was lying on the pavement next to my car in the driveway……


The common theme in these stories is that they all describe incidents of sleepwalking, a disorder that occurs when a person walks or performs another activity while asleep. Sleepwalkers look as though they are awake and can perform complex activities like preparing food, using the bathroom or even driving a car. If awakened, however, they will likely have no memory of what they were doing.

The duration of a sleepwalking episode can be very brief (a few seconds or minutes) or last for a half hour or longer. Sleepwalkers will return to normal sleep on their own if they are not disturbed, but not necessarily in their bed. It is an odd experience that can be very frightening when it occurs.



Sleepwalking facts and solutions

The classic image of sleepwalking
The classic image of sleepwalking
Awakening at the train station--could this be you?
Awakening at the train station--could this be you?
Twins are more likely to be sleepwalkers, suggesting a genetic link
Twins are more likely to be sleepwalkers, suggesting a genetic link
It's even possible to drive a car while asleep
It's even possible to drive a car while asleep
Play it safe.  Don't keep sharp objects out in the open
Play it safe. Don't keep sharp objects out in the open
Don't drink before bedtime
Don't drink before bedtime
And don't think about things that will worry you
And don't think about things that will worry you
Meditate, practice yoga or something else that will calm your thoughts before sleeping
Meditate, practice yoga or something else that will calm your thoughts before sleeping
If you are a chronic sleepwalker, see your doctor
If you are a chronic sleepwalker, see your doctor

Facts about sleepwalking


Nearly 18% of the population worldwide is prone to sleepwalking, and most people have sleepwalked on at least one occasion. Sleepwalking or somnambulism is most common with children and usually decreases as they get older. Although less common, adults can also be afflicted and it is estimated that between 4-10% of adults sleepwalk. A young child is likely to outgrow a pattern of sleepwalking, but children who don’t begin to sleepwalk until the age of eight or nine are apt to continue into adulthood.


The symptoms of sleepwalking

Sleepwalking symptoms are very recognizable and may include open eyes and a blank expression, sitting up or walking. When spoken to, the somnambulist might be unresponsive, slow to answer or will perhaps mutter incoherently. A sleepwalker may appear clumsy or dazed, but can still be capable of performing detailed activities while sleeping such as dressing themselves or driving a car. In some circumstances a sleepwalker will display agitated or violent behavior. If sleepwalkers are awakened, most will be confused, disoriented and retain no memory of what they did while asleep.


Causes of sleepwalking

There is no single cause for sleepwalking, and even someone with a propensity for it might respond to a wide variety of triggers. Sleepwalking can be prompted by many things, but typically its causes will fall into one of three general categories.

1. Genetics. Sleepwalking is linked to genetics because children are far more apt to be sleepwalkers if their parents were somnambulistic. Identical twins display greater tendencies toward sleepwalking, and males are more likely to experience sleepwalking disorders than females.

2. Medical conditions. Arrhythmia, asthma, fever and sleep apnea can contribute to sleepwalking. Panic attacks and other psychological conditions can also cause sleepwalking episodes.

3. Environmental conditions. Stress, alcohol intoxication, sleep deprivation, irregular sleep schedules and some prescription medications or over-the-counter drugs can cause sleepwalking in adults.


Sleepwalking treatment

Most people consider sleepwalking a nuisance more than anything else, but it is a cause for concern in any household that has a chronic sleepwalker in residence. It may not be possible to know why anyone sleepwalks, but issues known to contribute to the occurrence can be managed. Combating this problem can be approached in several ways, each representing a more concentrated effort to deal with the problem.

1. Make the home and bedroom as safe as possible. This does not address the problem of sleepwalking directly, but it keeps a chronic sleepwalker safer. Things a sleepwalker can do include: sleep in a ground floor bedroom; keep doors and windows locked; remove cords, wires or anything else a somnambulist can trip on; secure knives or other sharp items.

2. Manage stress or other sleepwalking triggers. Allow yourself to get enough sleep at night—so many problems vanish when we get the rest we need. Avoid dealing with disturbing subjects such as finances or relationships before bedtime. Practice yoga, meditate or engage in other activities that reduce stress. Refrain from drinking alcohol or taking medication directly before bedtime.

3. Consult a doctor if necessary. Medical conditions can cause sleepwalking, and treatment of the underlying condition can minimize chances for sleepwalking episodes to occur. A doctor can treat asthma, fever or other medical triggers. A sleepwalker that becomes injured or is violent during an episode should be encouraged to seek a medical examination.


Common misconceptions about sleepwalking

There are a several myths surrounding sleepwalking. These misconceptions add to the mystique of walking while asleep, but are typically not based in fact.

1. Sleepwalkers move about with their eyes closed and their arms outstretched in front of them. In reality, somnambulists walk like a waking person would, although perhaps more slowly or clumsily. This perception of sleepwalking doesn’t even exist in Hollywood anymore, but somehow the image remains.

2. It is dangerous to awaken a sleepwalker. It might startle a sleepwalker to find themselves in unexpected situations or surroundings, but waking a sleepwalker will cause them no physical harm. Choosing not to awaken sleepwalkers exposes them to risks from falling or bumping into things.

3. Sleepwalkers are acting out their dreams. It has recently been reported that many sleepwalkers have described dreamlike incidents that correspond to their actions performed while sleepwalking. However, Sleepwalking does not typically occur during REM sleep, so a sleepwalker is not thought to be acting out a dream.


Assess the problem and take action


I have “gone for a walk” three times in my adult life (that I am aware of). I awoke in my driveway once, in my front yard on another occasion, and sitting at the drawing table in my basement the third time. I didn’t worry much about my sleepwalking exploits, but I lived alone when each instance occurred and that was a cause for concern. No one was there to find me if I fell and injured myself, or I could easily have locked myself out of my house at night. Since one of these incidents occurred soon after another, I consulted my doctor for advice. I was facing a particularly difficult period in my life at the time and he suspected stress prompted the episodes. Things soon improved for me and the incidents did not reoccur.

Because sleepwalking is unpredictable and there is so much that could happen, it is important to take somnambulism seriously if it occurs. I usually meditate, practice yoga or listen to music at night before falling asleep—I find it helpful to relax and slow my thoughts in order to sleep soundly. Anyone who walks in their sleep should consider consulting a doctor, particularly if it happens frequently. There are no definitive “cures” for sleepwalking, but contributing factors can be identified and are often easily treated. Don’t wait until you find yourself at the train station some night…….

Goodnight, everyone. Sleep well.


Walking the Walk: A Sleepwalker's Poll

Have you ever gone sleepwalking?

  • How should I know? I'm asleep!
  • No
  • Yes
  • I sleepwalk often so get out of the way!
See results without voting

Comments 49 comments

MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 6 years ago from South Africa

Interesting information! It happened to me once, just after my grandmother passed away. I was climbing through a window on the 6th floor when my husband woke me up. My heart still shrinks when I remember this. Shock and grieve is definitely also some of the triggers. Thanks for sharing – some of the info was new to me.


saddlerider1 profile image

saddlerider1 6 years ago

What a great informative hub on sleepwalking. I took the vote and noticed that 100% said yes they sleepwalked. I know I had a few experiences in my life thus far. One was actually from being out with the boys and I came home intoxicated, fell to sleep immediately only to find myself peeing in my dresser drawer all over my tee shirts:0)

Once I found myself asleep in my basement sofa, yet I had gone to bed upstairs in the master bedroom? The third time I left the house and woke up on my deck in a deck chair, thankfully it was summer not winter:0)

It's interesting what tricks the mind plays on us mere humans, but I agree with you, one should not be alone when sleepwalking, one never knows how dangerous it could be. I'm certain other hubbers will share some interesting experiences with sleep walking. Can't wait to read them. Good post Mike, you did your homework well.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

MartieCoetser, thanks for reading. Climbing out of a sixth floor window? What a terrifying story! I'm glad your husband was there to keep something horrible from happening! Sleepwalking probably doesn't get the attention it deserves for how dangerous it can be. Your story certainly demonstrates the risks any sleepwalker faces. Thanks for sharing it, and I appreciate your comments.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Saddlerider, thanks for stopping by. Your sleepwalking story was classic. I read once that a full bladder can lead to incidents of sleepwalking. That's one I would rather not learn about the hard way.

I had a friend who was given to sleepwalking--I even wrote a hub about an occasion at his house when he acted very strangely, and we learned that he had been asleep much of the time. It was an odd day, to say the least.

I must confess I hope to hear other stories. I didn't go into too much detail with my own, but I have a tale or two to tell, also.

Thanks again, I hope your week is off to a good start.

Mike


VenusPandora profile image

VenusPandora 6 years ago

I used to date a guy who would use the bathroom while he was sleeping. He had no memory of it in the morning. He was not appreciative of me while I woke him up after finding him using the fridge as a toilet.

A friend of a friend told me that his friend would constantly walk to the driveway. One day, his mom unfortunately ran over him. Thus, he got the nickname "Stumpy." He lived on the second floor and they tried very hard to figure out ways to have him stay in the house. I am unsure if locking doors or getting power cords out of the way would help some people.


coffeesnob 6 years ago

Mike,

I can attest to the myth that sleep walkers walk with their arms out in front of them because if I had been doing this the last time I went galavanting in my sleep I would not have ended up with a busted lip :-)

good information here and some sound advice. I think that relaxation is so key. It is a wonder more people don't sleep walk just by virtue of the many that are so wound up with the stress of life..

Keep the good infor coming!

Blessings

CS


drbj profile image

drbj 6 years ago from south Florida

Beautifully written and well-researched, Mike. Thanks for your talent, time and effort. I have not had the unusual experience of sleepwalking - yet - but know it is not uncommon.

Like the elderly fellow who tells his wife that he knows there is a God. Because when he gets up to go to the bathroom during the night, and opens the bathroom door, God automatically turns on the light for him.

His wife looks at him with disgust and say, "OMG, you have been peeing in the fridge again!" :)


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

VenusPandora, thanks for reading. For some, locking doors etc. won't help, that's for sure. If people can drive a car while asleep, they can certainly get out the door. It still doesn't hurt to be safe, however. Who knows if a sleepwalker possesses the same abilities each time they sleepwalk?

Your stories about the fridge and Stumpy were interesting. It would seem like a lot of folks have experiences with sleepwalking--predictably, many of them aren't good.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Venus. I appreciate it.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

CS, thanks for reading. I wonder if perhaps it would be safer if sleepwalkers really did walk with their arms outstretched? If their eyes were shut it would be especially handy.

And, of course, relaxation is key. I was not a prolific sleepwalker, but I try to listen to music or meditate before going to bed, just to give myself a better chance to sleep soundly. If I minimize the likelihood of sleepwalking along the way, I am that much better off.

I hope your arms are out the next time you sleepwalk--that can hurt! Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Drbj, thanks for reading. Count yourself lucky if you are not a sleepwalker--there are lots of negatives to it and very few positives--finding God in the refrigerator notwithstanding.

I appreciate your stopping by, and thanks for the kind words about my hub. I am appreciative. Thanks again, and I hope your week is off to a good start.

Mike


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca

Full bladders would explain my husband's and son's sleepwalking episodes, Mike. My hubby was pretty 'lit' when he went to bed some years ago and I found him in our hallway peeing. Years before, when my son was about 6, he toddled out to the cat box to do the same!

My stint with sleepwalking would be better characterized as sleep rowing, I suppose, because just like the painting of Washington crossing the Delaware, I had moved my mattress across my bedroom and remembered this the next day. Crazy stuff!

Thanks for a great read!


Godwin Nwando profile image

Godwin Nwando 6 years ago from San Diego

Never sleepwalked in my life. But a very interesting article.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Lorlie, thanks for reading. I didn't mention it in my hub, but full bladders seem to be a stronger trigger for sleepwalking than I had realized. (At least your son used the cat box...!)

Sleep rowing? That is an interesting mental image, and it suggests that the things we do in are sleep are indeed, as you put it, crazy stuff.

Thanks for sharing your stories, Lorlie! Hope your week is off to a good start.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Godwin, thanks for stopping by. I guess I would have to say you should consider yourself lucky if you have never gone sleepwalking. It can certainly lead to some odd situations.

Thanks again for reading.

Mike


poetvix profile image

poetvix 6 years ago from Gone from Texas but still in the south. Surrounded by God's country.

You have some great information here. Sleep walking, to me, is very confounding both as a concept and as an event be it personally or seeing someone else do it.

I especially enjoyed the advice about how to keep sleepwalkers safe as years ago I had a very bad incident where it got really dangerous because I got a knife in my sleep. I wish I had known of this information at that time.

Thank you for posting such a useful Hub.


Pollyannalana profile image

Pollyannalana 6 years ago from US

I have never considered myself a sleepwalker but there is not a night of my life in years I don't think I don't wake up and get up and sometimes I remember I get a drink, sometimes I remember I walked around and decided I didn't want a thing and go back to bed, I always know I got up but I don't always remember why, but I guess I am OK as long as I don't leave the house, huh? That knife story reminds me though of once my husband working out of state and I started sleeping with a gun under my pillow and I woke myself up one night jerking my pillow around trying to get the safety off while it was still under my head in my sleep! I never sleep with a gun anymore.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Poetvix, thanks for reading. Sleepwalking can indeed be quite dangerous because sleepwalkers are unpredictable and can also sometimes become violent. Since no one knows what a sleepwalker will do, it is best to take precautions if there is a chronic sleepwalker in the house. If you ever still walk in your sleep, I hope you will take steps to make the house safer.

I certainly hope the information presented here is useful to someone, and I appreciate your stopping by. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Polly, thanks for your comments and insights. There are people who say they can remember what they did while sleepwalking, at least in general terms. Perhaps you are one of these folks. You probably are okay as long as you don't leave the house, but you might want to ensure there is nothing to trip over in your bedroom. Oh, and I am certainly glad you don't sleep with a gun any more. What you described would be frightening.

Hope your week is off to a good start, and take care.

Mike


Just A Voice 6 years ago

Mike~

Peeing does seem to be a theme in the sleep walking genre. I haven't done it myself (sleep walking that is), but have found various male members of my family peeing in odd places in the middle of the night. I have never heard of a woman peeing in odd places while asleep, so maybe this is just a male thing. The ability to pee while standing being the most likely culprit. lol

All kidding aside, it is a seriously scary situation if you are a chronic sleep walker. The possible dangers are terrifying.

Hope all is well with you :)


peacefulparadox 6 years ago

Sleep walking is a serious disorder and one should definitely see a doctor if suspected. I wrote an Hub article http://hubpages.com/t/18bdeb about comedian Mike Birbiglia who had sleepwalking disorder. He had jumped through and out a second story window in his sleep. Lucky he wasn't killed. There is a link where you can hear Birbiglia tell the story.


Lady_E profile image

Lady_E 6 years ago from London, UK

Hello Mike

It's interesting to know that people drive during this time - very strange. You are lucky that nothing bad happened during your incidents of sleep walking and it's nice to know the situation has improved.

A lot of people/kids still suffer from this disorder. I'm glad you raised the awareness.

Best Wishes.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Voice, thanks for stopping by. You are correct--you don't hear anything about women sleepwalking because they have to use the bathroom. Maybe it is a male thing, as odd as that sounds--the fact that men stand up to urinate might really have something to do with it, which is weird and kinda freaky.

Life is going okay, I hope things improve soon. Hope you're doing well, also. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Peacefulparadox, thanks for reading. Sleepwalking should never be taken lightly because of the harm we can do ourselves moving about in our sleep. Another reason to see a doctor is because the root causes might be something simple and easily managed.

Thanks again for reading, and take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hi, Elena. Sleepwalking is an odd thing. When I found myself in my driveway next to my car, there were indications that the car had been driven. I never knew for sure so I didn't include it in my brief retelling. You're right, I'm very lucky nothing bad happened to me. The situation has definitely improved, with nothing like this having happened for years.

Hope you're doing well these days, and thanks so much for stopping by--it is always nice to find your comments. Take care.

Mike


Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 6 years ago from Upstate New York

Cool hub, Mike. That is wild, that you might have driven a car while asleep. Very eerie, I imagine. I hope the yoga & etc., works, so that you aren't at any risk in the future.


Allan Douglas profile image

Allan Douglas 6 years ago from Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee

Very interesting Mike. Lots of good info. I can't say I've ever gone sleepwalking, but I have on several occasions found myself in a room with no idea why I'd gone in there!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Paradise, thanks for stopping by. I have had no incidents of sleepwalking in awhile, so I am assuming meditation or yoga before bedtime has helped somewhat. It is a frightening thought to think that I might have driven my car while asleep--even though I'm not sure I did. Hopefully anyone who has issues will sleepwalking will take steps to remain safe, because it can really be dangerous.

Thanks again for stopping by.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Allan, thanks for reading. If you haven't been sleepwalking, I would call that a very good thing. Finding yourself in a room with no idea how you got there sounds frightening, though. Is this in waking moments, like a blackout of some type? If so, that sounds like cause to see a doctor, as well. I assume it is nothing frequent because the tone of your comments doesn't suggest you're worried. Take care of yourself, though, okay?

Thanks again for stopping by.

Mike


Allan Douglas profile image

Allan Douglas 6 years ago from Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee

No real cause for concern... just brain rot. It happens.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

That's cool, Allan--just wanted to make sure! Take care.

Mike


John B Badd profile image

John B Badd 6 years ago from Saint Louis, MO

This is a very interesting hub Mike. I had no idea so many people sleep walked. If it has happened to me I am unaware of it but I have only woken up in strange locations after teenage drinking escapades.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hey, John, thanks for reading. A lot of folks are sleepwalkers, but consider yourself lucky if you are not counted amongst them--it isn't a lot of fun. It's happened to me a few times as a result of stress, and if it doesn't happen again it's okay with me.

Hope your week is going okay, and thanks for stopping by.

Mike


Storytellersrus profile image

Storytellersrus 6 years ago from Stepping past clutter

My young daughter was sleep climbing as I entered my room one night. She had been restless and I had agreed she could begin the night in my bed. The king-sized bed was pushed against a wall with a cutaway long open window. Had I not entered the room at that very moment, she might have plunged to the first floor. Obviously the bed was moved to the opposite end of the room immediately. You have written a very important hub. Thanks.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Storytellersrus, thanks for reading. Sleepwalking can be so dangerous, and it is particularly treacherous when someone who normally does not sleepwalk gets out of bed--it is hard to take precautions if you don't know you need to. It was certainly lucky you came back into the room when you did and a disaster was avoided.

Thanks again for reading, and stay safe.

Mike


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 6 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

Great and informative hub, Mike. Thank you for sharing this. My son used to sleepwalk. The first time I knew that, I was really frightened. Yet I had heard that it was not a good idea to awaken a sleepwalker for various reasons. We were visiting my mother and sleeping on the floor in the living room. There were several of us there. During the night my son got up, came over to me and tapped me on the shoulder. He said, "Will you tell that guy over there to go away? He does not belong here." I sat up, put my hand on his shoulder lightly and said, "Sure, I can do that. You go lie back down and I will take care of it." He went right back to his bed and continued to sleep the rest of the night. Me? I lay awake the rest of the night watching for that "guy".

It is funny what saddlerider said about peeing in the dresser drawer. My ex used to do the same thing when he sleep walked. I never woke him, for he would come right back to bed, never realizing what he did. That is when I decided to set out his clothes for him at night before we went to bed. I put them on top of the dresser where he could not reach them. In the mornings he had clean dry clothes. I had to take his underwear out of the drawer almost every day to launder it.


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Interesting stuff, my daughter claims to have walked in her sleep a few times. I've never done it as far as I know, but I do have some TMJ and I've heard it's from stress.

"Avoid dealing with disturbing subjects such as finances or relationships before bedtime."

This is sound advice for all of us Mike!

Ben


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Phyllis, thanks for reading. The story about your son sleepwalking was interesting--and it amazing how a sleepwalker will interact with others as though he were awake. It also makes you wonder who "that guy" was, doesn't it? If your ex-husband used the dresser drawers frequently for a bathroom, I would have been tempted to see if a doctor could help. It is an amusing story, but I'm sure the humor wore off quickly.

Thanks so much for sharing your stories, and I appreciate your stopping by. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hey, Ben! Nice to see you here! It's been a long time. I knew someone who TMJ and he was told it was from stress, as well. From what I've heard about it, I think I'll settle for sleepwalking.

And yeah, try to avoid thinking about just about everything before going to bed if you want a relaxing night's sleep!

Thanks for stopping by--come back anytime!

Mike


katiem2 profile image

katiem2 6 years ago from I'm outta here

One of my tree brothers was a sleep walker, he was once found out in the car acting as if he was driving, in his PJ's no less, we were always concerned about his safety. It is a big issue for many. I also know a girl who gets up and sleep eats without her awareness. That's so sad. Thanks for bringing sleepwalking to our attention. Peace :)


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Katiem, thanks for reading. Sleepwalking can be a very frightening situation, and while many people take it in stride, its potential for danger shouldn't be ignored. It is very much a problem for lots of people. The story about a girl who eats in her sleep is indeed sad, and I would think she would benefit from seeing a doctor--especially if she does this a lot.

Thanks so much for stopping by, I've seen your comments in forums and respect your comments and opinions a great deal. Take care.

Mike


katiem2 profile image

katiem2 6 years ago from I'm outta here

Mike, The sleepwalking girl is seeking a professional, it seems in her case it's an emotional issue. I too enjoy your input in the forums and glad to finally connect here with your work.

Katie


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Katie, that is a relief to hear that the girl is getting help. To eat in your sleep seems very much rooted to other issues, especially if it has happened multiple times.

Thank you for your kind words, your comments are greatly appreciated.

Mike


Skoenlapper 6 years ago

I have a friend who told me stories of how she used to sleep walk when she was a child. She used to walk into walls and doors. That was the closest to sleepwalking that I came. It is good to know more about this phenomenon. Thanks for the hub.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Skoenlapper, thanks for reading. The odd thing about walking into doors and walls is that most sleepwalkers have some perception of their surroundings. However, sleepwalkers do not exhibit grace or coordination, which might be the explanation.

I appreciate your stopping by. Thanks again.

Mike


SuperiorInteriors profile image

SuperiorInteriors 6 years ago from San Diego, California

I'm told that, as a kid, I used to sleepwalk all the time. Of course, I don't personally remember any of it... I sleep on a memory foam mattress now, because I was told it would help, and so far so good! I think, because the mattress kind of molds to your physique, it makes it harder for your semi-sleeping body to actually leave the bed. At any rate, no one's told me that I've sleep walked at all lately, not even my husband! Although I suppose I may have just "grown out of it." Anyway... informative Hub! Thanks for sharing, Mike!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

SuperiorInteriors, thanks for stopping by. They say that if you "grow out" of sleepwalking at a relatively young age (early teens), you might not have a problem with it. If you continue sleepwalking into your teens, you might continue to leave the bed as an adult. It sounds as if it turned out for the best for you--I am not certain there is much in the way of positive benefits in walking in your sleep.

Thanks so much for your comments, I appreciate them a lot. Take care,

Mike


generalbrat profile image

generalbrat 5 years ago from california,usa

ever since our son Ryan passed away his older brother has had many nightmares also we witnessed him sleep walking one night he woke up I have such a close bond connection with my boys it woke me out of bed I just felt it I woke my husband up to tell him hurry go check on Fabian he replies babe your hearing things go back to bed at that moment we both heard the front door and security door open and hit the wall i jumped out of bed ran out my room to find the door wide open I could hear my son calling out looking for his brother I ran down the porch stairs to the front of our home to find him walking to the back garage I called out his name he seemed as if he were hypnotized as he keep walking he heard me calling out his name and replies mom mommy then i grabbed his shoulder turned him around to hug him and kiss him and tell him he was safe as i walked him back inside he sleep with us the rest of the night we believe its from missing his brother so much and from witnessing the tragic shot to his brother's head being there when it happened having to deal with the death of his brother has brought him many more events like this sometimes he wakes up screaming frightened from being in a dark room we've heard him talking in his sleep other times he remembers his dreams and tells us about them these dreams they are very ugly scary demons ect. as he tell us you can see the fear in his eyes so we started to try to disrupt his sleeping patterns by waking him up about 30 minutes after he falls to sleep and again later on during the night we'll check on him we also had him to start praying to God before he goes to sleep it has helped but hasn't stopped. I also had many similar dreams as I grew up But my dreams are very real that many of the dreams give me clues or I'm visited by family members whom passed away also future events that end up coming true I've also seen ugly things and felt bad spirits trying to harm my children with Gods surrounding protection We thank him we've been safe.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Generalbrat, thanks for your very moving comments. I can't imagine what it must feel like to watch a family member killed. It is hardly surprising your son is dealing with a lot, and the issues he is struggling with is invading his sleep. It will take time and effort for him to work through issues of this magnitude. It is good that he has parents that love and care for him as much as you do. Please take care.

Mike


Deborah Sexton 2 years ago

As a child I was a sleepwalker. My dad once caught me unlocking the front door and made me get back in bed. I tried making coffee once while I was sleepwalking and put eggs in the coffee basket. I woke up when I couldn't slide the basket back into the coffee maker (the eggs were in the way)

Once I thought I was climbing a mountain and woke up to find I was crawling over the recliner.

At about 14, it all suddenly stopped, thank goodness

This is a very interesting hub

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Things to help you relax from Amazon.com

    More by this Author


    Click to Rate This Article
    working